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Smithsonian 



FY 2005 Budget Justification to 0MB 
September 2003 



ADMINISTRATIVELY CONFIDENTIAL 
Information not to be released until after the President's Budget is submitted to the Congress in 2003 



Smithsonian Institution 

Fiscal Year 2005 Budget Request to 0MB 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

VOLUME I 
Overview: The Smithsonian Institution in the 21** Century 1 

Budget at a Glance 

FY 2005 Guidance Level Budget 5 

FY 2005 Hierarchy of Need 15 

Bar Chart and Summary Table by Account 16 

Performance Plan 

FY 2005 Performance Plan 17 

Salaries and Expenses 

Federal Budget by Function 67 

Smithsonian institution Federal Budget by Program and Activity 68 

FY 2005 Change by Priority - Summary Narrative/Tables 
Non-Discretionary Costs 

Non-Recurring Cost 75 

Salary and Related Costs 76 

Utilities, Postage, Communications, Rent 77 

Security /Anti-Terrorism 79 

NAPA-Driven 79 

Staffing/Opening New Facilities 80 

Other Institutional Priorities 81 

Program Decrease 83 

Programs 

Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History 

and Culture 84 

Archives of American Art 89 

Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage 93 

National Air and Space Museum 97 

National Museum of American History, Behring Center 105 

National Postal Museum 109 

National Museum of the American Indian 1 1 3 

National Portrait Gallery 125 

Smithsonian American Art Museum 131 

Arthur M. Sackler/Freer Gallery of Art 137 

Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum 142 

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden 146 



National Museum of African Art 150 

National Museum of Natural History 155 

National Zoological Park 165 

Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory 1 72 

Smithsonian Center for Materials Research and Education 177 

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center 181 

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute 186 

Outreach 191 

Communications 199 

Institution-Wide Programs 204 

Office of Exhibits Central 207 

Major Scientific Instrumentation 210 

Museum Support Center 213 

Smithsonian Institution Archives 215 

Smithsonian Institution Libraries 218 

Administration 224 

Facilities Maintenance 234 

Facilities Operations, Security, and Support 239 

Facilities Capital 

Overview/Performance Objectives 245 

Five-Year Summary Table 252 

Individual Projects 253 



THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION IN THE 21^^ CENTURY 

For 157 years, the Smithsonian has remained true to its mission, "the 
increase and diffusion of knowledge." Today, the Smithsonian is not only the 
world's largest provider of museum experiences supported by authoritative 
scholarship in science, history, and the arts, but also an international leader 
in scientific research and exploration. The Smithsonian offers the world a 
picture of America, and America a picture of the world. 

The Smithsonian takes its task of serving the American public very 
seriously, and that commitment is manifest in myriad ways. For example, 
recently, the Smithsonian has assisted NASA in the Space Shuttle Columbia 
investigation, aided various law enforcement agencies in forensic criminal 
investigations, offered the general public a powerful exhibition on September 
1 1* that is now touring the nation, and expanded its network of affiliate 
museums all across the country. 

Over the decades, commitment to our mission has raised new 
challenges. We are determined to meet today's challenges and transform the 
Smithsonian into a modern 21 ^'-century institution serving all Americans 
across the country, wherever they may live. 

The Smithsonian's reputation rests on a strong foundation. Openings 
In November and December of 2003 will enhance that reputation. The 
Kenneth E. Behring Family Hall of Mammals opens to the public on 
November 1 5*^ at the National Museum of Natural History. This permanent, 
interactive hall features 274 mammal specimens in a variety of 
environments— from polar to desert regions and from dry to humid 
environments — and tells the story of mammal evolution. America on the 
Move, the National Museum of American History's first major exhibition on 
transportation since 1 964, opens on November 22"'^. It covers all the modes 
of transport— road, rail, air, water— from 1880 to the present, and makes for 
an exciting interactive experience. In December, the Udvar-Hazy Center of 
the National Air and Space Museum will open in Virginia, enabling the 
Museum to exhibit over 2,600 artifacts, including its largest aircraft and 
spacecraft. 

Yet, unfortunately, the Smithsonian is also an institution with a 
severely deteriorated infrastructure, outdated technology, and many aged, 
outmoded exhibitions. International and domestic events of the last few 
years have led to a drop in visitors with a resulting loss in revenues needed 
to supplement federal funding. Recently, visitation has increased slightly, but 
certainly not to pre-9/1 1 levels. Today's challenge is to build on the 



Smithsonian's reputation, rebuild the physical plant, bring visitors back, and 
thereby expand the reach of a great and trusted institution. 

The Smithsonian is a unique entity — an independent trust 
instrumentality— that is dependent for nearly 70 percent of its funding on the 
federal government. Ever mindful and grateful for this support from the 
American public, the Smithsonian will work with both 0MB and Congress to 
provide each with the information necessary to justify their continued 
support. The Institution is also working to improve its performance in line 
with the President's Management Agenda, with a number of initiatives 
underway to advance financial management, utilize e-government wherever 
possible, improve human capital planning and management, and more closely 
integrate budgeting with long-term performance goals. The Institution is also 
determined to revitalize science at the Smithsonian and is acting on the 
recommendations contained in "The Report of the Smithsonian Institution 
Science Commission," submitted to the Board of Regents in January 2003. 

Of the 76 recommendations in the Science Commission report, more 
than three-quarters are completed or underway and the remaining are being 
addressed. The Institution has made significant progress in building 
leadership capabilities with the selection of the new Director for the National 
Museum of Natural History, and searches underway for new directors of the 
Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and the Smithsonian Center for 
Materials Research and Education; improving communication about science 
at the Smithsonian; and developing a strategic plan focused on the four 
themes identified by the Science Commission: the origin and nature of the 
universe, the formation and evolution of Earth and similar planets, 
discovering and understanding life's diversity, and the study of human 
diversity. The Institution has included increases in its FY 2005 request to 
respond to high-priority recommendations, including funds for more 
fellowships and scholarly studies awards and the care of the National 
Museum of Natural History's collections, and increasing scientific capacity 
with new geographic information technology tools. 

The Smithsonian agenda is ambitious and focused. Given budget 
realities, Smithsonian priorities fall into five categories; the first is funding to 
keep the Institution's museums in operation, collections safe, and research 
programs intact— in other words, what can be referred to as non- 
discretionary costs. These include requirements for staff salaries and 
benefits, legislated pay raises, utilities, postage, communications, and rent. 

The Smithsonian's second priority is funding for security-related items. 
This includes all programs and activities to provide security to the 
Institution's staff, visitors, collections, and facilities, and to protect against 



terrorist actions. For example, this includes funds for additional staff required 
for visitor screening at all museums on the Mall, and for integrating the 
National Postal Museum guard force into the overall Smithsonian security 
force. Facilities Capital funds are also included for additional security 
infrastructure, such as construction of permanent physical barriers, and to 
complete construction of the new Pod 5 at the Museum Support Center for 
the storage of the National Museum of Natural History's alcohol collections. 

The Smithsonian's third priority is to secure funding increases for 
National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) recommended activities, 
such as addressing the Institution's critical facilities revitalization and 
information technology needs. This budget includes funding to continue to 
repair and renovate some of our oldest and most heavily visited museum 
facilities and to continue to address the Institution's maintenance needs. 
NAPA recommended that facilities revitalization be funded at $150 million 
for ten years. This recommendation was reinforced this past year when an 
outside engineering firm recommended that the Arts and Industries Building 
be closed because of deterioration of its roof, and the National Zoo's 
accrediting agency delayed approving its five-year accreditation because of 
concern about the Zoo's facilities and the care of its animals. While major 
improvements are planned for both of these facilities, major progress cannot 
be made without a significant increase in funds for facility revitalization. The 
Smithsonian is also continuing information technology initiatives such as 
implementation of the Enterprise Resource Planning system, infrastructure 
modernization, and meeting information technology security requirements. 

The Institution's fourth priority is securing the financial resources 
necessary to fulfill the Smithsonian's mandate to open and operate two new 
museums: the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) on the 
National Mall in September 2004, and the National Air and Space Museum's 
new Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, adjacent to Dulles Airport in Northern 
Virginia in December 2003; and to reopen the Patent Office Building and its 
two museums in July 2006. NMAI anticipates 4.5 million visitors annually, 
which will require additional staff to provide public programs and visitor 
services. The Udvar-Hazy Center is requesting staff to focus on education 
and Web programs to further increase visitation and address the President's 
national education goals. Also included are funds for additional staff and 
program activities to prepare for reopening the renovated Patent Office 
Building, home to the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the National 
Portrait Gallery. 

Lastly, the request includes several initiatives to address priorities for 
scientific research, public outreach through our annual Folklife Festival, 
reaching new audiences, enhancing web content, improving our contracting 



efforts, improving animal care at the National Zoo, and closing and removing 
staff and collections from the Arts and Industries Building, scheduled for 
FY 2005. 

The Smithsonian plays a vita! role in our country's civic, educational, 
and cultural life. Using art, artifacts, history, and science, the Smithsonian 
tells a comprehensive story— America's story. Now more than ever, this is an 
important service to maintain. To reach more Americans with such seminal 
stories, the Smithsonian needs to transform itself into a true 21 ^'-century 
institution. The Smithsonian Institution faces significant challenges if it is to 
continue to serve the public in an exemplary manner with both engaging, 
modern exhibitions backed by authoritative scholarship, and groundbreaking 
scientific research and exploration. What follows is our plan to meet these 
challenges as efficiently and effectively as possible. 



FY 2005 GUIDANCE LEVEL BUDGET 

Background. The 2003 0MB Circular A-1 1 requires agencies to submit 
an annual budget request at the guidance level, which is defined as the 
FY 2005 amount included in OMB's passback of the FY 2004 budget. For 
the Smithsonian, the total FY 2005 guidance level is $577 million, broken 
down as follows: 

• $486 million for Salaries & Expenses 

• $91 million for Facilities Capital 

To develop its federal budget request for FY 2005, the Smithsonian 
has gone through a rigorous internal budget development and decision 
process. Guiding this process have been the overarching priorities 
established by the Secretary for federal funding, in the following order: 

• Non-discretionary costs - including pay increases at the guidance level, 
utilities, rent, and communications. 

• Security-related items - the programs and activities needed to protect 
against terrorist actions and to provide adequate security to the 
Institution's people, collections, and facilities, including information 
technology security. 

• Overdue facilities maintenance and revitalization, and related 
information technology improvements - items that must be addressed 
in response to the congressionally mandated report of the National 
Academy of Public Administration released in 2001, including critical 
revitalization projects such as the Patent Office Building. 

• Staffing - the staff necessary to open the National Air and Space 
Museum's Steven Udvar-Hazy Center at Dulles Airport and the 
National Museum of the American Indian on the Mall, and to reopen 
the National Portrait Gallery and Smithsonian American Art Museum in 
the renovated Patent Office Building, in accordance with already 
announced target dates. 

• Other Institutional priorities - including all other initiatives and 
programs that have been identified as needing additional funding in 

FY 2005, including programs identified in response to the report of the 
Science Commission released late in 2002, and increases required to 
achieve accreditation for the National Zoological Park. 

This process has resulted in a total budget request for FY 2005 of 
$757 million, against an 0MB guidance level of $577 million. OMB's 



guidance represents less than a 2% increase over the Smithsonian's $567 
million budget approved by 0MB for FY 2004. It is also 1 % less than the 
pending House recommendation for FY 2004 ($584 million), and slightly less 
than the pending Senate recommendation ($578 million). 

in order to reduce the required funding level of $757 million to the 
guidance level of $577 million, a reduction of $180 million, the Smithsonian 
will be required to make significant reductions in critical programs. If 
required, these reductions would be made in reverse order of the priorities 
listed above, starting with other Institutional priorities, then the funds for 
opening the National Air and Space Museum's Udvar-Hazy Center and the 
National Museum of the American Indian, and so on. The following sections 
describe the impact of making these reductions in both the S&E and Facilities 
Capital accounts in FY 2005. 

Salaries & Expenses. The FY 2005 guidance level for the S&E account 
is $486 million, an increase of $9 million over the FY 2004 OMB-approved 
budget request pending before Congress. At this level, the Institution would 
only be able to fund a minuscule portion of the non-discretionary pay 
increase for federal employees (only $0.5 million of the total required pay 
increase of $13.1 million, the amount required to pay Workers' 
Compensation bills, would be funded). Even other non-discretionary 
increases for items such as automatic rent increases and unavoidable utility 
increases would not be funded. 

Other important programs that have been supported in the past by the 
Administration and the Congress would be eliminated to reach the guidance 
level of $486 million. The Smithsonian will have to halt high-priority security 
activities, including activities initiated in response to 9/11, and initiatives to 
eliminate vulnerabilities in the Institution's information technology 
infrastructure. The Institution is continuing to mitigate IT security 
weaknesses identified by the Inspector General in his July 2002 report. The 
report described inadequate IT security that leaves the Institution vulnerable 
to cyber attack and potential loss of data and disruption of services. This 
effort is vital in order to ensure the integrity of Smithsonian systems and 
data, comply with the provisions of the Federal Information Security 
Management Act, and make progress on the President's Management 
Agenda item on e-government. With regard to physical security, the 
Institution will not be able to provide sufficient security staffing at the 
National Museum of Natural History for visitor screening operations and 
security patrols, placing at risk national treasures, visitors, volunteers, and 
employees. Procurement and maintenance of a Disaster Management Plan 
for the Institution will also be delayed, as will the transfer of the guard force 
at the National Postal Museum to federal funding. 



6 



Next in our priorities, the Institution has been striving to be responsive 
to the findings of the congressionally nnandated NAPA report on the 
deteriorated condition of its facilities, which has led to a $1.5 billion backlog 
of overdue revitalization needs. One of the primary recommendations of the 
report was to increase funding and staffing levels for facilities maintenance. 
The Institution's proposed increase of $7.6 million for this purpose would 
bring the Smithsonian closer to meeting the minimum requirement of 
$15 million identified by NAPA. If not funded, the Institution's buildings will 
continue to be left with inadequate levels of maintenance, especially in the 
area of life-safety support. Particularly critical is the need to reinitiate fire 
detection and suppression system inspections. Failure to provide adequate 
maintenance will increase the future repair and replacement costs of the 
Institution's facilities. In addition, at the guidance level, the Institution would 
not be able to add staff support required for oversight and management of 
the facilities revitalization program that 0MB and the Congress have 
supported. Another loss in the NAPA-driven priority area would be the next 
increment of funding in the Institution's multiyear effort to replace its 
outmoded financial management system with an Enterprise Resource 
Planning System, which will provide the required procurement management 
capability. Also deleted will be funds for upgrading the Institution's Web 
infrastructure and establishing a digital infrastructure that will support image, 
audio, and video digital asset management and storage, as well as Web 
content management, delivery, and portal functions that are not now in 
place, such as e-commerce. There will also be no funds to replace desktop, 
graphics, and scientific workstations and printers on a four-year replacement 
cycle. These efforts are needed to modernize the Institution's information 
technology infrastructure consistent with industry best practices, and to 
provide the level of customer service that the President's Management 
Agenda envisions. 

Under the third priority would be the elimination of the final 
Increments of new staffing and operational funds required to support the two 
new museums now nearing construction completion: the NASM Udvar-Hazy 
Center, and the NMAI Mall Museum. Operations at both museums will be 
significantly impacted if the additional funds are not provided. At this level, 
funds required to prepare for the reopening in 2006 of the National Portra'rt 
Gallery and Smithsonian American Art Museum in the renovated Patent 
Office Building will also be eliminated, thus making it difficult to take full 
advantage of the government's $166 million investment in this magnificent 
facility. A delay in any of these projects would potentially weaken ongoing 
fundraising efforts by casting doubt on the Institution's ability to sustain 
facilities that are financed at least in part with private funds. Similarly, failure 
to properly fund the opening of these museums will likely generate a 



negative public reaction, particularly from the advisory boards composed of 
private citizens wlio support the museums. 

Finally, a variety of important initiatives will be affected by holding the 
Smithsonian to the guidance level. Foremost among these are two areas that 
the Institution must respond to in light of recent reports or studies: the report 
of the Science Commission in December 2002, and the American Zoo and 
Aquarium Association (AZA) accreditation report on the National Zoological 
Park. In response to the former, the Institution has identified priority areas 
for funding, including fellowships and scholarly studies, collections care and 
exhibit maintenance at the science museums, and research and collections 
information systems needs. In response to the AZA report, funds are needed 
for increased efforts related to animal health, including additional staffing, 
and for an improved information management system at the Zoo. None of 
these initiatives will be funded at the guidance level. Also affected will be 
necessary infrastructure costs to support the annual Folklife Festival on the 
Mall, previously but no longer provided by other agencies or groups; funds to 
stop the erosion of the Smithsonian Libraries' ability to purchase books and 
journals, including electronic resources; funds to set up an Institution-wide 
Web Content Unit to focus on the content of all Smithsonian websites, 
which reach an estimated 62 million people a year; information technology 
activities aimed at supporting the Institution's art collections information 
system and implementing an Institution-wide management system for the 
Smithsonian's vast photographic collections; and additional resources 
required to support the Institution's expanded contracting workload, 
including activities in support of the President's Management Agenda (e- 
government and competitive sourcing). 

The following table displays the specific reductions from the identified 
FY 2005 needs that would be required in the S&E account at the guidance 
level. 



Salaries and Expenses: 

FY 2005 Request 

Less 

Other Institutional Priorities: 
Folklife Festival Infrastructure 
SI Libraries Serials Inflation 
Office of Contracting 
Science-related increases: 

SI Research Information System 

Natural Science Geographic Info. System 

Natural History Research Collections Info. 
System 

Science Exhibits Maintenance 

Natural History Collections Care 

Fellowships & Scholarly Studies 
National Zoo Accreditation: 

Information Management System 

Animal Health Initiative 
Information Technology: 

Photography Collections 

Art Collections information System 

Web Content Unit 

Subtotal 
Opening/Reopening Museums: 
NMAI Mall Museum 
Support to Mall Museum (OFEO) 
NASM Udvar-Hazy Center 
Patent Office Building: 

National Portrait Gallery 

Smithsonian American Art Museum 

Subtotal 
NAPA-Driven: 
Information Technology: 

Enterprise Resource Program (ERP) 

Digital Infrastructure 

Desktop Workstations and Printers 
Facilities Program Staff Support 
Facilities Integration Support 
Facilities Maintenance 



FTES 


$(000)s 


${000)s 


1,209 




541,515 




-250 




— 


-200 




-3 


-332 




— 


-1,150 




~ 


-800 




— 


-1,500 




-1 


-200 




-1 


-1,500 




-1 


-800 







-75 




-5 


-752 







-756 




— 


-81 




-4 


-976 




-15 


-9,372 


532,143 


-23 


-2,396 




-45 


-2,479 




-10 


-1,409 




-9 


-3,085 




-12 


-4,578 




-99 


-13,947 


518,196 


„ 


-3,687 




— 


-1,736 




— 


-850 




-8 


-915 




-4 


-500 




-21 


-7,600 





FTEs $000s $000s 





Subtotal 


-33 


-15,288 


502,9( 


Security: 










IT Security 




~ 


-165 


^^ 


Protection Services 




-34 


-1,972 




National Postal Museum Security 




-21 


-1,049 






Subtotal 


-55 


-3,186 


499,7: 


Non-Discretionary: 










Utilities, Communications & Rent 




~ 


-1,201 




Pay and Related Costs 




~ 


-12,521 






Subtotal 


~ 


-13,722 





Subtotal, Decreases -202 -55,515 
Total, Salaries and Expenses 5,007 486,000 

0MB Guidance Level 486,000 



10 



Facilities Capital. If the Institution is funded only at the 0MB guidance 
level of $91 million for Facilities Capital in FY 2005, it would severely 
compromise progress toward ameliorating the seriously deteriorated 
condition of the Smithsonian's physical plant. The expected result would be 
a significant increase in major system failure throughout its facilities, and the 
costs of performing the required work in a later year would be much higher. 
Further, increasing amounts of maintenance funding will be needed just to 
keep the buildings functioning. 

In order to stay within the 0MB guidance level in FY 2005, the 
Institution would have to eliminate planned funding to continue required 
security improvements as identified in risk and threat assessments. Specific 
initiatives that would be deferred include construction of perimeter barriers, 
pop-up barriers, and guard booths at Mall facilities, and chemical, biological, 
and radiological mitigation at multiple facilities. This deferral would leave the 
Institution more vulnerable to the impacts of possible terrorist attacks. 
Another specific impact would be a significant reduction in funding for the 
National Zoological Park Asia Trail from $15 million required to $10 million. 
There would also be decreases in Other Revitalization Projects and Planning 
and Design for the Zoo, so the result would be to delay both the Asia Trail 
Phase I and II projects, and make it more difficult for the Zoo to resolve the 
problems cited in the recent accreditation report. The very low funding 
available at the guidance level for the National Museum of American History 
will delay the opening of the privately funded exhibits now being developed, 
including a new Introductory Exhibit, the For Wiiic/i it Stands exhibit, and the 
Star-Spangled Banner reinstallation. Failure to open these exhibits in 2006 as 
planned, which requires the requested level of $15 million in FY 2005, would 
breach the contract signed with the donor, and would likely result in system 
failures that would pose threats to museum visitors, staff, and collections. 

The guidance level budget of $2 million for the National Museum of 
Natural History will provide minimal funding for the ongoing renovation of the 
Museum at a time when there is significant donor interest in combining 
private money with federal funds to renovate major parts of the Museum 
such as the Oceans and Dinosaur Halls. Funding at the 0MB guidance level 
would imperil the approximately 430 present occupants of the Arts & 
Industries Building, and over 900,000 annual visitors, by subjecting them to 
the unacceptable risk of catastrophic failure of the roof system. Recent 
engineering reports, coupled with knowledge of last winter's complete failure 
of the roof system of the similarly-constructed O Street Market Building, as 
well as the B&O Museum in Baltimore, compel the Institution to vacate the 
A&l Building before winter 2005, even though at the guidance level there 
will not be a source of funding to relocate the occupants, collections, and 



11 



major components of the Institution's information technology infrastructure 
to other locations. 

Funding Other Revitalization Projects at the guidance level of $7.3 
million will result in the deferral of most of the critical life-safety and system 
projects, leading to significant cost increases. These funds are essential to 
allow the Institution to respond to urgent safety and habitability needs 
across the Institution. The reduction would leave only minimal amounts 
beyond performing emergency "breakdown" replacements of equipment that 
can no longer be maintained. The guidance level would also result in cutting 
Facilities Planning and Design funds by almost three-quarters from the level 
required to plan for future projects and to be ready to execute future years' 
project funding in a timely manner. Finally, at the guidance level, there would 
be no funding provided for the Institution's contribution for the VERITAS 
astronomy project in Arizona, delaying for another year this jointly-funded 
advance in ground-based astrophysics. 

The following table displays the specific implications of funding at the 
0MB guidance level for the Facilities Capital program. 



Facilities Capital : 

Facility 
Revitalization 

Major Projects 
Patent Office Building 
National Zoological Park 
National Museum of 

American History, 

Behring Center 
National Museum of Natural 

History 
Arts & Industries Building 
Multiple Locations 
Other Revitalization Projects 
Subtotal, Revitalization 

Construction 

Museum Support Center 
VERITAS 



Project 



Restore Patent Office Building 
Asia Trail I 

Revitalize NMAH, BC Public 
Space 

Ongoing Revitalization 

Relocate staff/collections 
Anti-Terrorism Modifications 



$(000)s 

0MB QMS 

Request Guidance 



Construct Pod 5 
Sitework 



44,400 
15,000 
15,000 



10,000 

26,400 

4,900 

16,150 

131,850 

18,000 
990 



44,400 

10,000 

3,000 



2,000 





7,300 

66,700 

18,000 




Facilities Planning & Design 



Total, Facilities Capital 



Miscellaneous Facilities 
Planning and Design 



23,050 
173,890 



6,300 
91,000 



12 



Facility Project 

Above the Line 

NZP Asia Trail II 
A&l Building-Consolidation 
Subtotal, Above the Line 

Total, Facilities Capital 215,262 91,000 



0MB 


0MB 


Request 


Guidance 


34,000 





7,372 





41,372 






13 



The following table shows the FY 2005 budget assuming the 0MB 
guidance level of $577 million. 



Salaries & Expenses 
FY 2004 Adjusted Base' 



FTES $(000)s $(000)s 



5007 



501,697 



Non-discretionary activities: 
Pay and Related Costs 
Non-recurring costs 
Programmatic decreases 

Subtotal 
Total, Salaries & Expenses 
Facilities Capital 
Revitalization 
Patent Office Building 
National Zoological Park 
National Museum of American History, BC 
National Museum of Natural History 
Other Revitalization Projects 

Subtotal 
Construction 
Museum Support Center, Pod 5 



5,007 



2Z 
32 



533 

-15,045 

-1,185 

-15,697 



486,000 



44,400 

10,000 

3,000 

2,000 

7,300 

66,700 

18,000 



Facilities Planning & Design 



Total, Facilities Capital 



Total Request at Guidance Level 



0MB Guidance Level 





6,300 


37 


91,000 


5,044 


577,000 




577,000 



^Adds back reduction of $25,144,000 to FY 2004 base of $476,553,000. 



14 



FY 2005 Hierarchy of Needs 
($ in OOO's) 





Change 


Full Request 


SALARIES AND EXPENSES 






FY 2004 Congressional Request^ 




501,697 


Non-Discretionary Costs 






Pay and Related Costs 


13,054 




Utilities, Postage, Communications, and Rent 


1,201 




Non-recurring Costs 


-15,045 




Subtotal 


-790 




Security 






Security Staffing 


3,021 




Information Technology Security Requirements 


165 




Subtotal 


3,186 




NAPA-Driven 






Information Technology: Enterprise Resource Planning System 


3,687 




Information Technology: Managed Information Technology Infrastructure 


2,586 




Facilities Program Staff Support 


1,415 




Facilities Maintenance 


7,600 




Subtotal 


15,288 




Staffinq/Openinq New Facilities 






NASM Udvar-Hazy Center 


1,409 




NMAI Mall Museum 


2,396 




NMAI Mall Museum Program Support 


2,479 




NPG/SAAM Reopening of Patent Office Building 


7,663 




SAAM Collections Acquisition 


(185) 




Subtotal 


73,762 




Other Institutional Priorities 






Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage: Festival Infrastructure 


250 




NMNH Collections Care 


1,500 




NMNH Repatriation Program 


(1,000) 




Science Exhibits Maintenance 


200 




NZP Animal Health Initiative 


752 




Fellowships/Scholarly Studies 


800 




Smithsonian Institution Libraries Serials Inflation 


200 




Information Technology Collections Information Systems 


4,362 




Information Technology Web Content Unit 


976 




Office of Contracting Support 


332 




Subtotal 


8,372 




SUBTOTAL, SALARIES AND EXPENSES 




541,515 


FACILITIES CAPITAL 






Security 






Major Revitalization: Security and Anti-Terrorism Modifications 




4,900 


Construction: NMNH, Museum Support Center, Pod 5 




18,000 


Subtotal 




22,900 


NAPA-Driven 






Major Revitalization: Patent Office Building 




44,400 


Major Revitalization: National Zoological Park 




15,000 


Major Revitalization: National Museum of American History, Behring Center 




15,000 


Major Revitalization: National Museum of Natural History 




10,000 


Major Revitalization: Arts & Industries Building 




26,400 


Other Revitalization Projects: Program Level 




16,150 


Facilities Capital Program: Planning and Design 




23,050 


Subtotal 




150,000 


Opening New Facilities 






VERITAS Sitework 




990 


Above-the-Line Request for NZP and A&l Building 




41,372 


SUBTOTAL, FACILITIES CAPITAL 




215,262 


TOTAL, FY 2005 REQUEST 

1 . .. ^ — \ — \ — —— : — — -. 




756,777 



Adjusted to Include $25.1 million offsetting reduction in FY 2004 request, of which the House and Senate have added funds to 
cover $12.8 million. 



15 



Smithsonian Institution 



Summary by Account 



I Salaries & Expenses ■ Facilities Capital 























■ 




600,000 - 














■K 










^^^^ 


? 


l^^l 


















3 




^^im^i 




h" /inn nnn 






in 

1 300,000 

o 

Q 


















1 nn nnn 






















FY 2003 



FY 2004 
Fiscal Year 



FY 2005 



Account 


FY 2003 


FY 2004 


FY 2005 


($ in Thousands) 


Appropriation 


Estimate 


Request 


Salaries & Expenses 


446,094 


='476,553 


541,515 


Facilities Capital 


98,779 


89,970 


215,262 


Total 


544,873 


566,523 


756,777 


^Reflects request to Congre 


ss, including offsf 


Btting reduction 


of $25,144,000 



16 



FY 2005 PERFORMANCE PLAN 

The Smithsonian institution's performance plan for FY 2005 is linl<ed 
to the Institution's revised strategic plan (2004-2008), and includes 
measurable performance objectives, strategies for achieving the objectives, 
and where possible outcome-based performance indicators for major 
programs and operations. 

The Smithsonian submitted its first comprehensive GPRA performance 
plan for PiT 2004 to 0MB in October 2002. Many of the challenges of 
performance management identified then persist; other than visitation data, 
few performance data have been tracked systematically across the 
Institution. Consensus on appropriate performance measures for some of the 
Institution's programmatic areas is developing. These areas include 
educational outcomes (because of the timeframes associated with 
determining long-term outcomes) and basic scientific research outcomes (as 
such outcomes are often unknown and/or unrelated to the original purpose of 
the research). 

The Institution has made progress in reducing and refining the 
performance indicators for its mission-driven programs as well as its 
administrative operations. A survey instrument has been designed and tested 
to collect, for the first time, pan-Institutional data on visitor satisfaction as 
well as new data on visitor experiences in Smithsonian museums and 
exhibitions, including enjoyment, inspiration, personal relevance, and 
learning. The FY 2005 plan includes baselines and targets for many of the 
new measures introduced in the 2004 plan. 

In accordance with the President's Management Agenda initiative on 
budget and performance integration, the Smithsonian has developed its 
FY 2005 request by reviewing all resources in relation to this performance 
plan. In the sections that follow, detailed justifications are provided for all 
funding and FTEs by Institutional strategic goal and by performance 
objective. Specific unit-level performance goals that support Institutional 
objectives are provided for each objective for which funds are requested. The 
following table provides a summary of the Institution's FY 2004 and 
FY 2005 estimates, and the proposed changes, by strategic goal and 
performance objective. 



17 



Federal Resource Summary by Performance Objective 
($ in Tliousands) 



Performance 
Objective 


FTE 


' 2004 
$000 


FY 

FTE 


2005 
$000 


C 

FTE 


Change 
$000 


Increased Public Engagement: 














1 .1 Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and other public 
programs 


517 


46,342 


548 


55,382 


31 


9,040 


1 .2 Expand a national outreach effort 


218 


23,332 


242 


24,878 


24 


1,546 


1 .3 Strengthen the high caliber of Smithsonian scholarship 
in support of public programs 


139 


11,082 


137 


11,725 


-2 


643 


1 .4 Develop and bring first-class educational resources to 
the nation 


194 


17,159 


219 


19,835 


25 


2,676 


1 .5 Improve the stewardship of the national collections 


557 


48,573 


528 


45,960 


-29 


-2,613 


1 .6 Deliver the highest quality visitor services 


34 


2,924 


39 


3,323 


5 


399 


Strengthened Scientific Research: 














2.1 Provide focus for the Institution's science resources 


8 


1,169 


8 


1,405 





236 


2.2 Strengthen capacity in science research 


25 


2,344 


25 


3,205 





861 


2.3 Conduct focused, scientific research programs that are 
recognized nationally and internationally 


422 


54,096 


421 


56,557 


-1 


2,461 


2.4 Develop the intellectual component of the collections 
by performing collections-based studies 


39 


3,809 


39 


3,985 





176 


Enhanced Management Excellence: 














3.1 Strengthen an Institutional culture that is customer- 
centered and results-oriented. 


295 


26,507 


303 


28,185 


8 


1,678 


3.2 Modernize the Institution's financial management 
systems and functions. 


50 


4,236 


50 


4,350 





114 


3.3 Modernize the Institution's information technology (IT) 
systems and infrastmcture 


164 


49,346 


171 


54,502 


7 


5,156 


3.4 Ensure that the Smithsonian's workforce is efficient, 
collaborative, committed, and Innovative 


92 


11,948 


93 


12,780 


1 


832 


3.5 Recruit, hire and retain a diverse workforce and 
promote equal opportunity 


25 


2,256 


25 


2,321 





65 


3.6 Enhance the reputation of the Smithsonian by 
maintaining good relations with the news media and with 
federal, state, and local governments 


19 


1,709 


19 


2,081 





372 


3.7 Complete major construction projects now underway 


31 


11,475 


30 


20,828 


-1 


9,353 


3.8 Execute an aggressive, long-range Smithsonian 
facilities program 


1,005 


210,724 


1,050 


331,437 


45 


120,713 


3.9 Ensure safety and protection of Smithsonian facilities, 
national collections, staff, visitors, and volunteers 


1,197 


60,971 


1,282 


72,500 


85 


11.529 


Greater Rnancial Strength: 














4.1 Secure the financial resources needed to carry out the 
Institution's mission 


18 


1,665 


18 


1,538 





-127 


4.2 Over the long term (five years), grow the annual 
payout from the Endowment at least as rapidly as inflation 
while maintaining the purchasing power of the Endowment 




















4.3 Increase the net income of Smithsonian Business 
Ventures 


































TOTAL 


5,049 


'591,667 


5,247 


756,777 


198 


165,110 



' Adds back undistributed reduction of $25,144,000. 



18 



PERFORMANCE PLAN 

Fiscal Year 2005 



Mission Statement 



For 157 years, tlie Smithsonian has remained true to its mission, "the 
increase and diffusion of knowledge." Today, the Smithsonian is not only the 
world's largest provider of museum experiences supported by authoritative 
scholarship in science, history, and the arts, but also an international leader 
in scientific research and exploration. The Smithsonian offers the world a 
picture of America, and America a picture of the world. 

The Smithsonian's Four Strategic Goals 

GOAL 1 : INCREASED PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT 

Enlarge the Smithsonian's audiences, expand its degree of engagement with 
the public in Washington and throughout the country, and improve the 
quality of the Smithsonian impact on its audiences, through both its public 
programs and science research. 

GOAL 2: STRENGTHENED SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH 

Pursue scientific advances and discovery by focusing resources in areas in 
which the Institution has recognized strengths due to staff, research 
platforms, and collections. 

GOAL 3: ENHANCED MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE 

Modernize Smithsonian management systems by bringing each of them to a 
level of quality and sophistication appropriate to an organization of the size 
and complexity of the Institution. 

GOAL 4: GREATER FINANCIAL STRENGTH 

Provide the financial support essential to achieving the Institution's goals. 



19 



Goals and Objectives 

GOAL 1: INCREASED PUBLIC EISIGAGEMEIMT 

1.1 Offer compelling, first class exhibitions and other public 
programs at Smithsonian museums, research centers, and the 
National Zoo. 

1 .2 Expand a national outreach effort to share the Smithsonian's 
resources with larger and more diverse audiences throughout 
America. 

1 .3 Strengthen the high caliber of Smithsonian scholarship in 
support of public programs. 

1 .4 Develop and bring first-class educational resources to the 
nation. 

1 .5 Improve the stewardship of the national collections for present 
and future generations. 

1 .6 Deliver the highest quality visitor services in Smithsonian 
museums. 

GOAL 2: STRENGTHENED SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH 

2.1 Provide focus for the Institution's science resources. 

2.2 Strengthen capacity in science research in four areas where the 
Smithsonian has unique and outstanding research capabilities: 
the origin and nature of the universe; the formation and 
evolution of Earth and similar planets; discovering and 
understanding life's diversity; and the study of human diversity 
and culture change. 

2.3 Conduct focused scientific research programs that are 
recognized nationally and internationally for their relevance, 
quality, and results. 

2.4 Develop the intellectual component of the collections by 
performing collections-based studies that enhance existing 
databases, create new databases, and increase the potential of 
the collections for future scientific inquiry and public use. 

GOAL 3: ENHANCED MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE 

3.1 Strengthen an Institutional culture that is customer-centered 
and results-oriented. 

3.2 Modernize the Institution's financial management systems and 
functions. 

3.3 Modernize the Institution's information technology (IT) systems 
and infrastructure. 

3.4 Ensure that the Smithsonian's workforce is efficient, 
collaborative, committed, and innovative. 



20 



3.5 Recruit, hire and maintain a diverse workforce and promote 
equal opportunity in all aspects of the Smithsonian's 
employment and business relationships. 

3.6 Enhance the reputation of the Smithsonian by maintaining good 
relations with the news media and with federal, state, and local 
governments. 

3.7 Complete major construction projects now underway. 

3.8 Execute an aggressive, long-range Smithsonian facilities 
program, with increased emphasis on maintenance and 
revitalization. 

3.9 Ensure safety and protection of Smithsonian facilities, national 
collections, staff, visitors, and volunteers. 

GOAL 4: GREATER FINANCIAL STRENGTH 

4.1 Secure the financial resources needed to carry out the 
Institution's mission. 

4.2 Over the long term (five years), grow the annual payout from 
the Endowment at least as rapidly as inflation while maintaining 
the purchasing power of the Endowment. 

4.3 Increase the net income of Smithsonian Business Ventures. 



21 



G0AL1: INCREASED PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT 

Enlarge the Smithsonian's audiences, expand its degree of engagement with 
the public in Washington and throughout the country, and improve the 
quality of the Smithsonian impact on its audiences, both through its public 
programs and science research. 

Objective 7. 1 Offer compelling, first class exhibitions and other public 
programs at Smithsonian museums, research centers, and the National Zoo 

Creating memorable experiences of discovery for visitors 

Exhibitions and other public programs are a primary vehicle for "diffusion 
of knowledge." The Smithsonian is determined that all of our exhibitions 
and other public programs: 

• Are of first-rate quality; 

• Provide accurate and up-to-date information; 

• Focus on topics that are relevant to the public interest; 

• Take into account different learning styles and visitor preferences; 

• Spark dialogues among visitors and make tangible our compelling 
stories. 

Strategies for Objective 1 . 1 

1.1.1 Phase out exhibitions that do not meet the newly established 
exhibition quality guidelines in the June 2003 report: Raising the 
Bar: A Study of Exhibitions at the Smithsonian Institution. 

1 .1 .2 Systematically use audience input and evaluation to improve 
programming. 

1 .1 .3 Increase collaboration and cooperation among SI units and 
between SI and non-SI organizations in exhibition planning and 
development. 

1 .1 .4 Create connections among exhibitions at the Smithsonian that 
encourage the public to explore the wealth of knowledge and 
information available across the Institution. 

1 .1 .5 Use our international collections in new and creative ways so that 
the American public has a greater appreciation and understanding 
of aesthetic and cultural traditions throughout the world. 



22 



Performance Indicators for Objective 1.1 (See Appendix A) 

1 .1 .a Number of visits to SI museums and tlie National Zoo 

1 .1 .b Number of visits during seasonal non-peak times to SI museums 
and the National Zoo 

1 .1 .0 Percentage of "excellent" or "superior" ratings on regular 
assessments of visitor "enjoyment, learning, personal relevance, 
and appreciation of museum objects" 

1 .1 .d Percentage of visitors who rate Smithsonian museums higher than 
. similar museums outside Washington, DC 

1 .1 .e Number of exhibitions over five years old that comply with newly 
established exhibition quality guidelines for comfort, engagement, 
and relevance 

1 .1 .f Number of exhibitions developed in collaboration with other units. 

Objective 1.2 Expand a national outreach effort to stiare the Smithsonian's 
resources with larger and more diverse audiences throughout America 

Reaching Americans where they live 

Through its Office of National Programs and outreach activities in all 
of its museums and research centers, the Smithsonian is bringing the 
treasured objects and memorable stories of the nation's scientific, 
artistic, and cultural heritage, as well as an understanding of the 
scientific process and the results of state-of-the-art science research, 
to communities across the nation. 

Strategies for Objective 1 .2 

1 .2.1 Share Smithsonian knowledge and collections with the American 
people through traveling exhibitions, object loans, and other 
outreach programs. 

1 .2.2 Build and support a network of affiliated museums, cultural 
organizations, and educational institutions that work with the 
Smithsonian and with each other to serve their local communities 
more effectively. 



23 



1 .2.3 Develop approaches to Smithsonian collections, research, 
education and public programs that reflect the diversity of the 
American people, including underserved audiences of ethnic 
populations and persons with disabilities. 

1 .2.4 Expand use of the Web to bring Smithsonian resources to the 
nation and the world. 

1 .2.5 Improve public access to Smithsonian knowledge and collections 
through its reference services in archival units, libraries, museums 
and research centers. 

Performance Indicators for Objective 1.2 (See Appendix A) 

1 .2. a Number of visitors to Smithsonian traveling exhibitions 

1 .2.b Number of States and Territories with Smithsonian traveling 
exhibitions 

1 .2.C Number of States with affiliates 

1 .2.d Number of cultural alliances and multi-cultural and cross- 
disciplinary partnerships formed as a result of outreach programs 

1 .2.e Percentage of exhibitions, programs, and collaborations that 

address - through content or by audience outreach - the diversity 
of the American experience 

1 .2.f Number of outgoing loans of Smithsonian collection 
objects/specimens 

1 .2.g Number of collections objects/specimens available to the public 
online 

1 .2.h Number of digital images associated with collection records and 
available to the public online 

1 .2.i Number of Web site visitor sessions 

1 .2.] Number of responses to requests for reference services by the 
public 



24 



1 .2.k Percentage of visitors responding to surveys in Smithsonian 
museums who identify themselves as belonging to an ethnic 
minority and who agree that SI programs are relevant to them 

1 .2.1 Percentage of visitors with disabilities who agree that exhibitions 
and facilities are accessible 

Objective 1.3 Strengthen the high caliber of Smithsonian scholarship in 
support of public programs 

Strategies for Objective 1 .3 

1 .3.1 Utilize the work of Smithsonian researchers/scientists and scholars 
in the development of Smithsonian-originated and collaborative 
exhibitions, public programs, and related publications. 

1 .3.2 Utilize the work of Smithsonian researchers/scientists and scholars 
in the interpretation of our collections for the public. 

1 .3.3 Publish books deriving from first-rate Smithsonian scholarship that 
are accessible to a wide range of readers. 

1 .3.4 Ensure quality and importance of research in support of 
exhibitions, public programs, and related publications through 
internal and external peer review. 

1 .3.5 Maximize the value of Smithsonian library and archival collections 
by increasing knowledge of and integrating access to major 
research resources. 

Performance Indicators for Objective 1 .3 (See Appendix A) 

1.3.a Number of reviews/citations of Smithsonian scholarship in support 
of public programs in specialized publications and peer-reviewed 
journals (print and electronic) 

Objective 1.4 Develop and bring first-class educational resources to the 
nation 

Strategies for Objective 1 .4 

1 .4.1 Develop an education strategic plan with performance indicators to 
deliver first-class Smithsonian education programs across the 
nation. 



25 



1 .4.2 Produce and deliver Smithsonian educational services and products 
that are informed by research about learning and that meet the 
educational needs of the Institution's audiences. 

1 .4.3 Continue to develop and deliver broad-based educational 
opportunities for adults and non-traditional learners. 

1 .4.4 Develop and disseminate, nationally and internationally, 
Smithsonian education resources for diverse audiences. 

1 .4.5 Develop and disseminate validated systems and models for 
evaluating the relevance and effectiveness of Smithsonian-based 
education programs. 

1 .4.6 Forge partnerships with school systems, educators, education and 
museum professional associations and others to expand 
opportunities for development and dissemination of Smithsonian- 
based education resources. 

Performance Indicators for Objective 1 .4 (See Appendix A) 

1 .4. a Percentage of congressional districts that receive Smithsonian Pre- 
K-12 education instructional material 

1 .4.b Number of instructional materials distributed to PreK-12 public and 
private schools 

1 .4.C Number of hits and visitor sessions to Smithsonian education web 
sites 

1 .4.d Number of participants in distance learning programs 

1 .4.e Number of education programs reported per state 

1 .4.f Number of people participating in education programs in 
Smithsonian facilities 

1 .4.g Number of education programs involving 

collaborations/partnerships between the Smithsonian and other 
museums/educational organizations and between individual 
Smithsonian units 



26 



Objective 1.5 Improve the stewardship of the national collections for present 
and future generations 

Strategies for Objective 1 .5 

1 .5.1 Conduct a comprehensive study of collections at the Smithsonian 
that will result in the design of a framework for and the generation 
of policies to guide collections activities at the Smithsonian within 
available resources including collections use, preservation and 
conservation, and decision-making with respect to acquisitions and 
deaccessions. 

1 .5.2 Maintain state-of-the-art collections management systems and 
processes including the physical storage, conservation, and 
preservation needed to ensure the longevity of the national 
collections. 

1 .5.3 Fully implement collections information systems (CIS) to facilitate 
collections tracking and inventory and to obtain full physical and 
legal control of collections. 

1 .5.4 Increase access to collections information through digitization and 
electronic access. 

1.5.5 Explore innovative ideas and collaborative approaches to 
collections development and management. 

1 .5.6 Continue disciplined acquisition of the most significant objects and 
collections that document the nation's and the world's cultural and 
scientific heritage. 

Performance Indicators for Objective 1 .5 (See Appendix A) 

1.5. a Percentage of units with up-to-date (reviewed/revised in last five 
years) collecting plans 

1.5.b Number of collection records in unit's automated CIS 

1.5.C Number digital images associated with collection records in a unit's 
automated CIS 

1 .5.d Percentage of units meeting unit-level targets for care and storage 
of collections that meet or exceed Institutional standards for care 
and storage 



27 



1 .5.6 Number of visitor-days of public (non-SI) use of collections 

Objective 1.6 Deliver tfje fiig/jest quality visitor services in Smithsonian 
museums 

Strategies for Objective 1 .6 

1.6.1 Provide effective, accurate, and timely information; orientation 
resources; and adequate numbers of volunteers and paid staff to 
meet visitor information and assistance needs. 

1 .6.2 Generate a plan to enhance the visitors' experiences that 
encompasses the full range of ways in which visitors interface with 
the Smithsonian, other than programs or exhibitions. 

1 .6.3 Assess, on an ongoing basis, the level and quality of services such 
as signage and public amenities from the perspective of the visitor. 

Performance indicators for Objective 1 .6 (See Appendix A) 

1 .6. a Percentage of "excellent" or "superior" ratings on regularly 
conducted visitor assessments of visitor services 



28 



GOAL 2: STRENGTHENED SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH 

Pursue scientific advances and discovery by focusing resources in areas in 
which the Institution has recognized strengths related to staff, research 
platforms, and collections 

Objective 2. 1 Provide focus for the institution's science resources. 
Strategies for Objective 2.1 

2.1 .1 Implement the recommendations of the Science Commission as to: 
(a) the areas of research focus; (b) leadership criteria; (c) 
organizational structure; and (d) the role of Smithsonian science 
research in the larger national and international research agenda. 

2.1 .2 Develop strategic plans in all major research areas, tied to unit 
budget plans, with interim one-year objectives, and develop 
effective means for measuring and evaluating results. 

Performance Indicators for Objective 2.1 (See Appendix A) 

2.1 .a Percentage of units that have developed long-term strategic plans 
for research that identify unit targets of excellence and 
complement overall strategic vision for Smithsonian science 

2.1 .b Percentage of science research funds redirected to priority areas of 
science excellence set out by Science Commission Report and SI 
Science plan. 

Objective 2.2 Strengtfien capacity in science research in four areas where 
the Smithsonian has unique and outstanding research capabilities: The Origin 
and Nature of the Universe, The Formation and Evolution of the Earth and 
Similar Planets, Discovering and Understanding Life's Diversity, and Study of 
Human Diversity and Culture Change. 

Strategies for Objective 2.2 

2.2.1 Maintain and increase excellence in research through active 
recruitment and retention of excellent, new scientific staff and 
replacement of those who leave to ensure that Smithsonian science 
is carried out by top scientists in targeted research areas. 



29 



2.2.2 Increase number and dollar value of grants, contracts and in-kind 
contributions in areas of scientific emphasis. Ensure institutional 
matching funds as appropriate to meet granting agency 
requirements. Ensure SI capabilities for all Federal extramural, 
competitive funding programs. 

2.2.3 Grow the fellowship and scholarly studies and fellowship program, 

2.2.4 Enhance professional training including increasing external support 
for pre- and post-doctoral fellows and undergraduates from 
institutions here and abroad, through establishment of endowments 
or other forms of long-term support. 

2.2.5 Increase and foster effective scholarly collaborations and 
partnerships with other institutions, including other government 
agencies. 

2.2.6 Increase technological capability through securing cutting edge 
instrumentation. 

2.2.7 Utilize the resources of Smithsonian libraries and archives in 
support of science research. 

2.2.8 Provide laboratories, equipment, and other infrastructure support 
to conduct world-class science. 

Performance Indicators for Objective 2.2 (See Appendix A) 

2. 2. a $ Amount of contracts and grants awarded and endowments, 
gifts, and in-kind contributions obtained for science research 

2.2.b Number of applications and awards for SI research, fellowships 
and internships; number of internships and fellowships funded by 
units. 

2.2.C Number of new research scientists hired. Number of fellowships 
funded by SI; number of fellowships funded by units. 

2.2.d Impact of science achieved from increased technology capability 
through centrally managed funds. 



30 



Objective 2.3 Conduct focused scientific researcti programs that are 
recognized for tfteir relevance, quality, and results 

Guiding Discovery, See/dng Answers: 

The work of Smithsonian scientists around the globe contributes to 
knowledgeabout a host of subjects, from human biology and the 
Earth's ecosystems to conservation of our material culture, to the 
riddles of the cosmos. 

Strategies for Objective 2.3 

2.3.1 Establish regular visiting committees at appropriate intervals to 
assess the quality, relevance to Smithsonian and national science 
goals, and leadership of research programs. Such visiting 
committees should have continuity of membership. 

2.3.2 Ensure a Professional Accomplishment Evaluation Committee ( 
PAEC) peer review processes that fairly assesses quality and 
impact of scientific researchers, provides feedback for staff 
development, and is linked to the annual performance appraisal 
process. 

2.3.3 Take a leadership role by participating in or hosting national and 
international conferences, and by participating as keynote and/or 
invited speakers at such meetings. 

2.3.4 Be recognized as an authoritative source of science information for 
policy makers, government agencies and other external 
organizations. 

2.3.5 Publish in leading peer-reviewed journals. 

2.3.6 Receive external recognition (honors and awards) for science 
accomplishments. 

Performance Indicators for Objective 2.3 (See Appendix A) 

2. 3. a Percentage of Smithsonian science research programs meeting 

National Academy of Sciences standards for quality, relevance, and 
results as assessed by visiting committees 

2.3.b Percentage of annual scientific staff evaluations tied to PAEC 
results 



31 



2.3.C Number of keynote talks and presentations 

2.3.d Number of leadership roles in various national and international 
science communities 

2.3.e Number of publications in peer-reviewed journals 

2.3.f Number of reviews/citations of Smithsonian science research in 
specialized publications and peer-reviewed journals (print and 
electronic) 

2.3.g Number of SI researchers/scientists serving on editorial boards of 
peer-reviewed journals 

2.3.h Number of visiting scientists and scholars coming to the Institution 
to conduct research 

Objective 2.4 Develop the intellectual component of the collections by 
conducting collections-based studies that enhance existing databases, create 
new databases, and increase the potential of the collections for future 
scientific inquiry and public use 

Strategies for Objective 2.4 

2.4.1 Conduct studies to identify and systematically classify specimens 
so that collections information can better support comparative and 
conceptual research and applied work. 

Performance Indicators for Objective 2.4 (See Appendix A) 

2. 4. a Number of new taxa described or revised 

2.4.b Number of enhancements of entries to records in existing 

databases (e.g. number of species records improved by addition of 
information such as taxonomic data, geographic distributions, 
molecular data or photo documentation) 

2.4. c Number of collections records in CIS 



32 



GOAL 3: ENHANCED MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE 

Modernize Smithsonian management systems by bringing each of them to a 
level of quality and sophistication appropriate to an organization of the size 
and complexity of the Institution. 

Objective 3. 1 Strengthen an Institutional culture that is customer-centered 
and results-oriented 

Strategies for Objective 3.1 

3.1 .1 Align the Smithsonian Strategic Plan with the individual unit plans. 

3.1 .2 Build accountability into the system by integrating budget and 
performance data. 

3.1 .3 improve the business acumen and management and skill levels of 
all Smithsonian directors and senior managers. 

3.1 .4 Conduct customer satisfaction surveys by Smithsonian central 
service units, analyze results, and address performance 
deficiencies. 

3.1 .5 Employ benchmarking against national or industry best practices. 

3.1 .6 Enhance workforce capabilities and structure to meet challenges of 
the 21" century. 

Performance Indicators for Objective 3.1 (See Appendix A) 

3.1 .a Number of unit-level plans that are linked to the Sl-wide Strategic 
Plan and annual Performance Plan 

3.1 .b Number of central units conducting annual customer surveys to 
determine satisfaction with quality and timeliness of services 

Objective 3.2 Modernize the Institution's financial management systems and 
functions 

Strategies for Objective 3.2 

3.2.1 Establish and implement effective financial management policies 
and processes. 



33 



3.2.2 Conduct Institution-wide compliance reviews to measure 
adherence to and effectiveness of internal controls and recommend 
fixes for any deficiencies uncovered. 

3.2.3 Integrate budget, planning, formulation, and execution processes. 

Performance Indicators for Objective 3.2 (See Appendix A) 

3. 2. a Percentage of OCFO financial directives updated and released for 
review in conformance with two-year cycle 

3.2.b Number of compliance reviews of internal controls conducted by 
OCFO 

Objective 3.3 Modernize tiie institution '^s information tecfjnoiogy (IT) 
systems and infrastructure 

Strategies for Objective 3.3 

3.3.1 Make IT infrastructure robust, reliable, and secure. 

3.3.2 Implement a financial management system that provides 
information required by central management and the units and 
provides for adequate internal controls. 

3.3.3 Update human resource (HR) management systems and processes 
to support responsiveness to employee and employer HR needs. 

3.3.4 IVIodernize the Institution's aging telephone systems. 

3.3.5 Enhance the facilities management system to help manage the 
revitalization, repair, and maintenance of existing facilities, as well 
as the construction of new facilities. 

Performance Indicators for Objective 3.3 (See Appendix A) 

3. 3. a Restoration of Network Service 

3.3.b Network availability 

3.3.C Time to perform telephone move or additions 

3.3.d Time to perform telephone configuration change 



34 



3.3.e Telephone Call Manager availability 

3.3.f Voice Mail availability 

3.3.g Customer satisfaction with quality of IT services 

3.3.h Customer satisfaction with timeliness of IT services 

3.3.i Number of workdays it takes to provide financial reports from 
Enterprise Resource Management (ERP) System 

Objective 3.4 Ensure that the Smithsonian workforce is efficient, 
collaborative, committed, and innovative 

Strategies for Objective 3.4 

3.4.1 Explore with Congress and the Board of Regents the development 
of a personnel system for the Smithsonian's federal workers that is 
more flexible and reflective of the unique nature of the Smithsonian 
workforce. 

3.4.2 Develop innovative methods to recognize and reward high 
performance and creativity by Smithsonian staff members. 

3.4.3 Build a cooperative environment among all Smithsonian staff 
through increased communication and activities that underscore 
the Smithsonian's special mission and each staff member's 
contribution to its success. 

3.4.4 Develop a workforce restructuring plan. 
Performance Indicators for Objective 3.4 (See Appendix A) 

3. 4. a Performance rating completion rate 

3.4.b Percentage of senior executives with individual performance plans 
that link to unit/office and Institutional Performance Plans 

3.4.C Percentage of employees who are satisfied with working at the 
Smithsonian on biennial employee survey to rate level of job 
satisfaction 



35 



Objective 3.5 Recruit, hire and retain a diverse worliforce and promote equal 
opportunity in all aspects of the Smithsonian's employment and business 
relationships 

Strategies for Objective 3.5 

3.5.1 Widely communicate the Smithsonian's commitment to diversity in 
the workforce and develop tools to ensure that diverse candidate 
pools exist for available positions. 

3.5.2 Provide training and informational programs that promote a work 
culture that values diversity. 

3.5.3 Evaluate management officials and supervisors on their compliance 
with applicable Equal Employment Opportunity laws, rules, and 
regulations and on their efforts to achieve a diverse workforce. 

3.5.4 Promote and facilitate the use of small, minority, women-owned, 
and other under-utilized businesses in the Smithsonian's 
procurement and business relationships. 

Performance Indicators for Objective 3.5 {See Appendix A) 

3. 5. a Percentage of underrepresented minorities and women in the 
Smithsonian Institution's workforce. 

3.5.b Percentage of SI procurement contract dollars awarded to small, 
minority, women-owned, and other under-utilized businesses. 

Objective 3.6 Enhance the reputation of the Smithsonian by maintaining 
good relations with the news media and with federal, state, and local 
governments 

Strategies for Objective 3.6 

3.6.1 Respond to all government inquiries in a timely manner with 
accurate, concise information. 

3.6.2 Respond to all reasonable media inquiries in a timely manner with 
accurate, concise information. 

3.6.3 Initiate story ideas to the media about Smithsonian exhibitions, 
research, and programs. 



36 



3.6.4 Conduct periodic customer satisfaction surveys witli media and 
government customers, analyze results, and address performance 
deficiencies. 

Performance indicators for Objective 3.6 (See Appendix A) 

3. 6. a Percentage of targeted media that cover identified five big 
Smithsonian projects 

Objective 3. 7 Complete major construction projects now underway 

Strategies for Objectives 3.7 

3.7.1 Adhere to timelines, scopes and budgets established for major 
projects (Udvar-Hazy Center, National Museum of the American 
Indian, and Pod 5 of the Museum Support Center). 

Performance Indicators for Objective 3.7 (See Appendix A) 

3. 7. a Number of projects on time compared to baseline Beneficial 
Occupancy Date (BOD) 

> Complete Udvar-Hazy Center 

> Complete NMAI 

> Award design and construction contracts for Pod 5 

3.7.b Number of projects within budget compared to baseline estimate 
of cost 

Objective 3.8 Execute an aggressive, long-range Smithsonian facilities 
program, with increased emphasis on maintenance and revitalization 

Strategies for Objective 3.8 

3.8.1 Subject to available funding, plan and execute revitalization 
program defined in NAPA report, July 2001, and Museums and 
Facilities: Critical Assessment and Improvement Objectives, 
September 28, 2001. 

3.8.2 Adhere to timelines, scopes and budgets established for major 
revitalization and construction projects (Patent Office Building, 
National Museum of American History, National Zoo Asia Trail, Pod 
5 and the National Museum of Natural History). 



37 



3.8.3 Meet timeframes in the Arts and Industries Building (AIB) Master 
Plan schedule for construction documents and initiate special 
studies as required. 

3.8.4 Integrate all facilities management staff from museums and units 
into the Office of Facilities Engineering and Operations. 

3.8.5 Implement Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) processes at all 
levels. 

3.8.6 Implement a customer survey to assess satisfaction, and take 
action to address problems identified. 

Performance Indicators for Objective 3.8 (See Appendix A) 

3. 8. a Percentage of available revitalization funds obligated 

3.8.b Number of projects on time compared to construction plan 

> Make significant progress on POB 

> Award design contract for NMAH 

> NZP Asia Trail 

> Begin design of Pod 5 and continue revitalization at NMNH. 

3.8.C Percentage of facilities management integration completed 

3.8.d Percentage of Predictive Testing and Inspection of critical 
equipment completed 

3.8.e Percentage of staff provided with RCM training 

3.8.f Planned maintenance as percentage of total maintenance 

3.8.g Percentage of compliance with Preventive Maintenance schedules 

3.8.h Percentage of customers satisfied with maintenance service on 
annual customer satisfaction survey 

Objective 3.9 Ensure safety and protection of Smithsonian facilities, national 
collections, staff, visitors, and volunteers 

Strategies for Objective 3.9 

3.9.1 Subject to available funding, execute new heightened security 
measures to minimize the potential for terrorist attacks and 



38 



mitigate the results of an attack, while permitting an appropriate 
level of public access to collections and properties. 

3.9.2 Develop and implement emergency preparedness plans to mitigate 
effects of manmade and natural disasters and facilities-based 
disasters, including effects on collections, facilities, and equipment. 



3.9.3 Upgrade existing security systems by enhancing alarm/CCTV 
capabilities, redesigning unit control rooms, and developing a 
comprehensive maintenance program for ail upgraded unit control 
rooms. 

3.9.4 Provide code compliant occupational safety, environmental 
management, fire protection, and health services. 

Performance Indicators for Objective 3.9 (See Appendix A) 

3. 9. a Percentage of new security systems installed and operational 

3.9.b Percentage of upgraded existing security systems installed and 
operational 

3.9.C Number of unit Emergency Plans implemented in accordance with 
Sl-wide Emergency Preparedness Master Plan 

3.9.d Percentage decrease in Risk Assessment Code (RAC) 1 and RAC 2 
findings 



39 



GOAL 4: GREATER FINANCIAL STRENGTH 

Provide the financial support essential to achieve the mission of the 
Institution. 

Objective 4. 1 Secure the financial resources needed to carry out the 
Institution 's mission 

Strategies for Objective 4.1 

4.1 .1 Prepare a fund raising plan for substantially increased private 
donations to meet the Institution's priority needs both centrally and 
in the units. 

4.1 .2 Secure the financial resources needed for major construction and 
revitalization projects now underway, as well as sustained annual 
support for exhibitions and programs. 

4.1 .3 Increase revenues from externally-funded grants and contracts, 
and indirect cost recovery. 

4.1 .4 Prepare detailed budget requests and justifications that clearly and 
convincingly portray the needs of the Institution for presentation to 
the Administration and Congress. 

4.1.5 Maintain a balanced central trust budget. 
Performance Indicators for Objective 4.1 (See Appendix A) 

4.1 .a $ Amount of voluntary support (gifts) to Smithsonian 

4.1 .b $ Amount of non-government grants and contracts 

4.1 .c $ Amount of federal, state, local and international grants and 
contracts 

Objective 4.2 Over the long term (five years), grovj the annual payout from 
the Endowment at least as rapidly as inflation while maintaining the 
purchasing power of the Endowment 

Strategies for Objective 4.2 

4.2.1 Each year, pay out five percent of the average market value per 
share over the prior five years. 



40 



4.2.2 Develop and use an investment strategy which allows the 

purchasing power of the Endowment to keep pace with inflation 
over the long-term. 

Performance Indicators for Objective 4.2 (See Appendix A) 

4. 2. a $ Value of annual Endowment payout 

4.2.b $ Value of the Endowment portfolio 
Objective 4.3 Increase the net income of Smit/jsonian Business Ventures 
Strategies for Objective 4.3 

4.3.1 Develop new business revenue streams that reduce the Institution's 
reliance on travel and tourism. 

4.3.2 Undertake new marketing and editorial positioning of Smithsonian 
Magazine to improve advertising revenues, including attracting new 
subscribers to ensure the continuing health of overall circulation. 

4.3.3 Expand direct marketing programs to increase membership and 
sales of affinity products and services. 

Performance Indicators for Objective 4.3 (See Appendix A) 

4. 3. a $ Amount net operating income of SBV (operating revenues less 
operating expenses) 

> $ Amount net operating income from sales from museum stores, 
restaurants and IMAX theaters 

> $ Amount net operating income from The Smithsonian Catalogue 
sales 

> $ Amount net operating income from Smithsonian Magazine 

4.3.b $ Amount of funds transferred to Smithsonian Trust funds by SBV 



41 



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FY 2001 baseline: 1,720 new loan transactions. 
FY 2002; 1,633 new loan transactions 


Output measure correlates with degree of 
accessibility to collections by the public. Data is 
captured by all units and reported to NCP and the 
Office of the Chief Information Officer (OCIO). 
FY 2001 baseline; 5.2 million objects/specimens 


Output measure correlates with degree of 

accessibility to collections by the public. Data is 

captured by all units and reported to NCP and 

OCIO. 

FY 2001 baseline; 90,500 images 


Outcome measure. Data captured by OCIO. 
FY 2001 baseline: 43.4 million visitor sessions 


Developing output measure correlates with broad 
public access to SI knowledge and collections. 
First data set from all units captured in July 2003. 
FY 2002 baseline: 109,944 responses 

The number of requests is expected to decrease 
over time as more information is added to the SI 
website(s). 

Units Reporting: AAA, AM, APAS, CFCH, CHNDM, FSG, 
HMSG, HSD (3 collections) NASM, NMAfA, NMAH, 
NMAI, NMNH, NPG, NPM, ONP (SCEMS), SAAM, 
SCMRE, SIL. 


Developing outcome measure. Based on new pan- 
Institutional visitor survey that was designed and 
tested in FY 2003. The measure is percentage of 




1.2.g Number of collections 
objects/specimens available 
to the public online 


1 .2.h Number of digital 
images associated with 
collection records and 
available to the public 
online 


1.2.i Number of Web site 
visitor sessions 


1.2.J Number of responses 
to requests for reference 
services by the public 


1.2.k Percentage of visitors 
responding to surveys in 
Smithsonian museums who 


















self-identified non-white and/or multiple race 
respondents who rate the personal relevance of 
exhibitions as "excellent" or "superior." Currently 
developing plan for survey administration in each 
Smithsonian museum annually beginning in spring 
2004. 


Developing outcome measure. Based on new pan- 
Institutional visitor survey that was designed and 
tested in FY 2003. The measure is the percentage 
of visitors self-reporting a "temporary or permanent 
disability" who rate the accessibility of exhibitions 
and building design "excellent" or "superior." 
Currently developing plan for survey 
administration in each Smithsonian museum 
annually beginning in spring 2004. 


identify themselves as 
belonging to an ethnic 
minority and who agree that 
SI programs are relevant to 
them 


1.2.1 Percentage of visitors 
with disabilities who agree 
that exhibitions and 
facilities are accessible 



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Target 




FY 2004 
Target 




FY 2003 
Target 




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Developing outcome measure. Data not currently 
collected centrally. In FY 2004 SI will define the 
measure and develop pan-Institutional data capture 
and reporting procedures. Subsequent years will 
include systematic data collection, establishment of 
a baseline and development of targets. 


u 
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1 

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B 

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1 


1.3.a Number of 
reviews/citations of 
Smithsonian research in 
support of public programs 
in specialized publications 
and peer-reviewed journals 
(print and electronic) 



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FY 2005 
Target 
















FY 2004 
Target 
















FY 2003 
Target 
















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58 

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3 
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Developing outcome measure. Definition and 
data capture procedures will be established by 
Smithsonian Center for Education and Museum 
Studies (SCEMS) in FY 2004. 


Developing output measure. Definition and data 
capture procedures will be established by 
Smithsonian Center for Education and Museum 
Studies (SCEMS) in FY 2004. 


Developing outcome measure. Definition and 
data capture procedures will be established by 
Smithsonian Center for Education and Museum 
Studies (SCEMS) in FY 2004. 


Developing output measure. Definition and data 
capture procedures will be established by 
Smithsonian Center for Education and Museum 
Studies (SCEMS) in FY 2004. 


Developing output measure. Definition and data 
capture procedures will be established by 
Smithsonian Center for Education and Museum 
Studies (SCEMS) in FY 2004. 


Developing outcome measure. Definition and 
data capture procedures will be established by 
Smithsonian Center for Education and Museum 
Studies (SCEMS) in FY 2004. 


Developing process measure. Definition and data 
capture procedures will be established by 
Smithsonian Center for Education and Museum 


5 

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1.4.a Percentage of 
congressional districts that 
receive Smithsonian Pre-K- 
12 education instructional 
material 


1 .4.b Number of instructional 
materials distributed to PreK- 
12 public and private schools 


1.4.C Number of hits and 
visitor sessions to 
Smithsonian education Web 
sites 


1.4.d Number of participants 
in distance learning programs 


1.4.e Number of education 
programs reported per State 


1 .4.f Number of people 
participating in education 
programs in Smithsonian 
facilities 


1.4.g Number of education 
programs involving 
collaborations/partnerships 



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FY 2004 
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FY 2003 
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Developing process measure. Definition and data 
capture procedures will be established by Under 
Secretary for Science (USS) in FY 2004. 


Developing process measure. Definition and data 
capture procedures will be established by Under 
Secretary for Science (USS) in FY 2004. 


s 

i 

c 

C 
a 

S 

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2. 1 .a Percentage of units 
that have developed long- 
term strategic plans for 
research that identify unit 
targets of excellence and 
complement overall 
strategic vision for 
Smithsonian science. 


2. 1 .b Percentage of science 
research funds redirected to 
priority areas of science 
excellence set out by 
Science Commission 
Report and SI Science plan. 



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Target 










FY 2004 
Target 










FY 2003 
Target 










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Developing outcome measure. USS will coordinate 
with Office of Development and Office of Sponsored 
Projects to establish baselines and set targets. 


Developing outcome measure. USS will coordinate 
with Office of Fellowships to establish baselines and 
set targets. 


Developing outcome measure. Definition and data 
capture procedures will be established by Under 
Secretary for Science (USS) in FY 2004. 


Developing outcome measure. Definition and data 
capture procedures will be established by Under 
Secretary for Science (USS) in FY 2004. 


s 

i 

c 

9i 

c 

03 

s 


2.2.a $ Amount of 
contracts and grants 
awarded and endowments, 
gifts, and in-kind 
contributions obtained for 
science research 


2.2.b Number of 
applications and awards 
for SI research annually 
funded fellowships and 
internships; number 
funded by units. 


2.2.C Number of new 
research scientists hired. 
Number of fellowships 
funded by SI; number of 
fellowships funded by 
units. 


2.2.d Impact of science 
achieved from increased 
technology capability 
through centrally managed 
funds. 






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FY 2005 
Target 














FY 2004 
Target 














FY 2003 
Target 














1 

cs 

3 

1 

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K 

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M 

Q 


Developing outcome measure. Definition and data 
capture procedures will be established by Under 
Secretary for Science (USS) in FY 2004. 


Developing process measure. Definition and data 
capture procedures will be established by Under 
Secretary for Science (USS) in FY 2004. 


Developing outcome measure. Definition and data 
capture procedures will be established by Under 
Secretary for Science (USS) in FY 2004. 


Developing outcome measure. Definition and data 
capture procedures will be established by Under 
Secretary for Science (USS) in FY 2004. 


Developing outcome measure. Definition and data 
capture procedures will be established by Under 
Secretary for Science (USS) in FY 2004. 


Developing outcome measure. Definition and data 
capture procedures will be established by Under 


o 

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a 

s 
a 

S 

u 


2. 3. a Percentage of 
Smithsonian science 
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NAS standards for 
relevance, quality, and 
performance as assessed by 
visiting committees 


2.3.b Percentage of annual 
scientific staff evaluations 
tied to PAEC (Professional 
Accomplishment Evaluation 
Conmiittee) results 


2.3.C Number of keynote 
talks and presentations. 


2.3.d. Number of leadership 
roles in various national and 
international science 
communities 


2.3.e Number of 
publications in peer- 
reviewed journals 


2.3.f Number of 
reviews/citations of 





















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Developing outcome measure. Definition and data 
capture procedures will be established by Under 
Secretary for Science (USS) in FY 2004. 


Developing outcome measure. Definition and data 
capture procedures will be established by Under 
Secretary for Science (USS) in FY 2004 


Smithsonian science 
research in specialized 
publications and peer- 
reviewed journals (print and 
electronic) 


2.3.g Number of SI 
researchers/scientists 
serving on editorial boards 
of peer-reviewed journals 


2.3.h Number of visiting 
scientists and scholars 
coming to the Institution to 
conduct research 



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FY 2005 
Target 




FY 2004 
Target 




FY 2003 
Target 




a 

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capture procedures will be established by Under 
Secretary for Science (USS) in FY 2004. 


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described or revised 


















Developing output measure. Definition and data 
capture procedures will be established by Under 
Secretary for Science (USS) in FY 2004. 


Developing output measure. Data not currently 
collected centrally. In FY 2003 USS will define the 
measure and develop data collection and reporting 
procedures across the Science Division. Subsequent 
years will include systematic data collection, 
establishment of a baseline and development of targets. 


2.4.b Number of 
enhancements of entries to 
records in existing databases 
(e.g. number of species 
records improved by addition 
of information such as 
taxonomic data, geographic 
distributions, molecular data 
or photo documentation) 


2.4.C Number of collections 
records in CIS 





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VoIP Call 

Manager will 

maintain 

system 

availability 

of 99.99% 

during 

normal 

business 

hours 


VoIP Voice 

Mail will 

maintain 

system 

availability 

of 99.99% 

during 

normal 

business 

hours 


At least 85% 
of customers 
rate the 
quality of IT 
services 
satisfactory 
or better 


00 

■4— > 

to 

CO 

•4—. 




VoIP Call 
Manager will 
maintain system 
availability of 
99.99% during 
normal business 
hours 


VoIP Voice 
Mail will 
maintain system 
availability of 
99.99% during 
normal business 
hours 


At least 80% of 
customers rate 
the quality of IT 
services 
satisfactory or 
better 


O 

o 

00 
■t-t 
CO 
CO 

— 




< 


< 


< 


< 

z 


Desk reporting software. 

FY 2001 Baseline: Request for telephone 

conflguration changes take 2 to 6 weeks. 


Outcome measure. Data captured by OCIO 
through system management software. 
FY 2001 Baseline: Data not captured 


Outcome measure. Data captured by OCIO 
through system management software. 
FY 2001 Baseline: Data not captured 


Outcome measure. Data captured by OCIO 

through on-line customer surveys. 

FY 2001 Baseline: Data not captured 


o 

u 
o 

>^ 

X) 
T3 

3 

o 

CO 

Q 

3 

E 
1) 

E 
o 
o 

3 

o 




3.3.e Telephone Call 
Manager availability 


3.3.f Voice Mail 
availability 


3.3.g Customer 
satisfaction with quality of 
IT services 


1 

*-* 
CO 

3 

u 

en 



of customers 
rate the 
timeliness of 
IT services 
satisfactory 
or better 




customers rate 
the timeliness of 
IT services 
satisfactory or 
better 


Provide 

financial reports 
to SI units not 
later than the 
first business 
day of each 
month 




Provide 

financial reports 
to SI units not 
later than the 
first business 
day of each 
month 


through on-line customer . 

FY 2001 Baseline: Data not captured 


Outcome Measure. Data captured by OCIO 
through ERP system. 

FY 2001 Baseline: Financial reports are 
distributed to units in 5 to 7 work- days 


satisfaction with 
timeliness of IT services 


3.3.i Number of workdays 
it takes to provide 
financial reports from 
Enterprise Resource 
Management (ERP) 
System 



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p (11 



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CO = § 

c t> 2 
ca o G 

rt-i o 



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tn -iii -^ S 

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Target 


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Ogress 
ward parity 
ith 0PM 


2 

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13 

> 





X 

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Statutory 
government- 
wide 


seline. 
onitor and 
ovide 
larterly 
ports on SI 
ntracts 




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cs 

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til 

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3 

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a 





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£ 




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= •£< 


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cs 


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? ••= 

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1 1 = 
« ^ 3 

> - i. 
CS >, 4i 

52 -n ■^ 




s 

c 
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a 




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c 

a 

CL, 


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CO cs 

fc -c £ 









00 

c 
u 

H 

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Oh 


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c 



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£ 


CO 

u 

CO 
CO 


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XI 


3 


2 


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^ 


in 

IT) 


■g .£ 
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=^ •£ "^ 

T3 C cs 


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FY 2005 
Target 




FY 2004 
Target 


< 


FY 2003 
Target 


< 


s 
% 
es 

fa. 
3 

1 

c 
,0 

*w 

tc 

3 

•mm 

Q 


Developing outcome measure. Office of Public 
Affairs (OPA) will annually identify five big projects 
and most critical media outlets. At fiscal year-end it 
will calculate percentage of targeted media that 
actually covered identified projects. 
FY 2004 baseline = 

1 . Wright Brothers exhibition: aviation media; general press 

2. Udvar Hazy Center: networks; international press 

3. America on the Move exhibition: general press; AAA 
outlets; transportation press (airline magazines, travel 
publications) 

4. Mammal Hall: general media; networks; science outlets 

5. NMAI Museum ongoing planning: Indian Country media; 
general mass media; tourist destination press 


u 

a 

2 

■0 
e 

e 

i 

fa. 

a 

fa. 


3. 6. a Percentage of 
targeted media that cover 
identified five big 
Smithsonian projects 



in 

o 
o 



O 
O 



o 
o 

> 



a; 



•I 

a, 
ss 

■I 

i 



Jto 






o 

fa. 
,© 



u 



as 
es 

fa. 
3 

es 



CO 

3 
u 
cc 



<o 



s- s 



•Si, 



es 

s 

c 






fa. 

o 
a 

C 

s 
a 

S 

fa. 

;2 

fa. 



1 

es 

H 
















Open to the 
public in 
December 2003 


Project 

substantially 

complete 


Award 

construction 

contract 




1 

es 
H 


en 


Substantial 
completion in 
3"* quarter FY 
2003 


Award final 
construction 
phase for 
outfitting of the 
4'" floor 


Award design 
contract 


(T) 




Outcome measure. Data captured by Office of 
Facilities Engineering and Operations (OFEO). 








d 

O 
>-. 

X 
I 

a 
o 

3 
Q 

3 

IX 

a 
m 

E 

E 
o 
o 

«-> 

3 

O 




3. 7. a Number of projects 
on time compared to 
baseline Beneficial 
Occupancy Date (BOD) 


• Complete Udvar-Hazy 
Center 


< 

B 
o 

E 
d 

• 


• Award design and 
construction contracts 
for Pod 5 


3.7.b Number of projects 
within budget compared 
to baseline estimate of 
cost 



I 



« 




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© 




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k. 








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o 




■^ 




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00 


^ 




^ 


fo 




^ 


aggre 
zation 


.Si 


o 


s as 


u 


« S 


a 


^ E 


?? 


a ?J 


o 


;^ k. 


«s 






ct3 i 




00 ^ 


NN 




u 


^ « 


s 




s 


^ "ts 


u 


S s 


^ 




Sm 




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© 3c 




<S i. 








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fa ^ 


^ 




m 




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r^ u 




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^ 




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3 


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1 


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D. 


Cm 

o 


rt 


c 
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03 

Q 






t« 


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1/1 


d) 


3 


k. 


w 


3 


«1 


M 


• ^N 


03 


Q 


E 




CO 




CO 




Q> 




O 




O 




u. 




Oh 


fc> 




o 




■^^ 




es 




w 




■p« 




"O 


c^ 


c 


O 


NM 


(Si 


V 


u 


u 


CS 


e 


c 
11 


S 


H 


u 


0) 


£ 


CLh 


u 


CS 


£ 


00 




CO 



CM 
(O 











1 














Award 2"" 
increment of 
renovation 
contract 








50% of entire SI 
staff attend one 
session and 
100% of SI 
maintenance 
staff attend two 
sessions 








CM 


Award 1'' 
increment of 
renovation 
contract in 2"'' 
quarter 


Award design 
contract 


e^- 




25%) of entire 
SI staff attend 
one session and 
75% of SI 
maintenance 
staff attend two 
sessions 






Indicator of progress toward reducing 1.5 billion 
identified as needed to revitalize SI. 


d 
o 

E 
3 

n- 
a 
o 

CS 
^— » 
CS 

Q 

3 

CO 
CS 

O 

B 

CJ 

£ 
o 

3 

o 










O 
>^ 

1 

O 

es 

Q 
2 

3 
1 


Developing outcome measure of effectiveness of 
preventive maintenance planning and procedures. 
Definition and data capture procedures will be 
established by OFHO in FY 2004. 


Developing process measure. Definition and data 
capture procedures will be established by OFEO in 


available revitalization 
funds obligated 


3.8.b Number of projects 
on time compared to 
construction plan 


• Make significant 
progress on POB 


• Award design contract 
for NMAH 


• Asia Trail and Kid's 
Farm at Zoo 


• Begin design of Pod 5 
and Oceans Hall at 

NMNH 


3.8.C Percentage of staff 
provided with RCM 
training 


3.8.d Planned 
maintenance as percentage 
of total maintenance 


3.8.e Percentage of 
compliance with 



CO 

















Developmg outcome measure. Oh'EO will develop, 
test, and conduct survey in FY 2004. 


Preventive Maintenance 
schedules 


3.8.f Percentage of 
customers satisfied with 
maintenance service on 
annual customer 
satisfaction survey 



Si 
•2 

ii 

.2 



CO 

s 

On 

§1 



ON 

> 

o 
a 

e 
•^^ 

u 

■3 

c 

u 

e 
« 

a 



FY 2005 
Target 










FY 2004 
Target 


o 


o 


o 


o 


FY 2003 
Target 


IT) 


o 


NO 


o 


« 

3 

s 

s 

5 

Q 


O 

E 
O 

-a 

3 

Q 

3 

CO 

ca 

s 

■4— » 

3 
3 

o 


O 

Uh 

O 

-a 

3 
*-» 
Vu 

ca 
o 

ea 

ca 
Q 

3 

CO 

ca 

1 

1 

3 

o 


o 

PL, 

O 

-a 

3 

ca 
o 
« 

Q 

3 

CO 

ca 

E 

3 

a 

3 

o 


i 

O 

3 

D- 
ca 
o 
ca 
ca 
Q 

t 

3 

CO 

ca 
u 

E 

u 

E 
o 
o 

•4—1 

3 

o 


5 

c 
£ 


3.9.a Percentage of new 
security systems installed 
and operational 


3.9.b Percentage of 
upgraded existing security 
systems installed and 
operational 


3.9.C Number of unit 
Emergency Plans 
implemented in 
accordance with Sl-wide 
Emergency Preparedness 
Master Plan 


3.9.d Percentage decrease 
in Risk Assessment Code 



CO 



CO 

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o 











c 




















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2005 
reet 


o 


C 




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CN 


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(operating revenues less 
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operating income from 
sales from museum 
stores, restaurants and 
IMAX theaters 

> $ Amount net 
operating income from 
The Smithsonian 
Catalogue sales 

> $ Amount net 
operating income from 
Smithsonian Magazine 


4.3.b $ Amount of funds 
transferred to Smithsonian 
Trust funds by SBV 



CO 



SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION 

FEDERAL BUDGET BY FUNCTION TABLE 

Salaries & Expenses 

(Dollars in Thousands) 



Function 


FY 2003 


FY 2004 


FY 2005 


Appropriation 


Estimate 


Estimate 


Public Programs 


$ 30,335 


$ 35,430 


$ 40,751 


Exhibitions 


44,883 


43,149 


48,371 


Collections 


62,847 


65,050 


61,477 


Research 


59,244 


61,898 


63,209 


Facilities 


106,222 


137,471 


146,541 


Security 


66,327 


62,676 


65,697 


Information Technology 


30,681 


37,671 


43,129 


Operations 


59,655 


58,352 


59,740 


Total, Smithsonian 


$460,194' 


$501,697' 


$528,915^ 



' FY 2003 Appropriation does not reflect rescission of prior years' 
unobligated funds of $14,100,000. 

' FY 2004 Request does not reflect offsetting reduction of $25,144,000. 

^ FY 2005 Request excludes Necessary Pay of $12,600,000. 



67 



^Hsi Unit Base Adjustments and Transfers 
















Requested Increases and Decreases 




















Necessary Pay 


FY 2005 Request 


ation 


Technology 


Operations 


SI Activities 


Es 


Amount 


FTEs 


Amount 




FTEs 


Amount 


FY 2003 Appropriation 
















FY 2004 Request 
















FY 2005 Request 


4 


43,129 


535 


59.740 


12.600 


5,209 


541.515 


MUSEUMS AND RESEARCH INSTITUTES 
















American Museums 
















Anacostia Museum/Center for African American History and Culture 


1 


64 


5 


566 


62 


22 


1,969 


•"Adjustment to Base to Reflect FY 2005 Plan 





3 





18 








Arcfiives of American Art 


Q 





6 


525 


65 


22 


1,914 


Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage 





64 


2 


65 


43 


18 


2,247 


'*Folklife InfrasTruciure 







,-, 










National Air and Space Museum 


7 


1,440 


25 


2,062 


557 


184 


19.235 


' •Preparaiion/move of Collections, NASM 





,, 














• -Kiosks and Exfiibit Cases. NASM 


6 

















"Udvar-Hazy Center, NASM 




















•'Exhibition Maintenance 


io 

















••Adjustment to Base to Reflect FY 2005 Plan 





974 














National Museum of American History 





1,059 


19 


1,419 


752 


235 


20.519 


National Postal Museum 





30 





8 


24 


6 


591 


National Museum of the American Indian 


7 


4,276 


49 


4.309 


665 


383 


34.828 


" 'Exhibition Activities 




















••Facilities Requirements 




















••IT Infrastructure 





(2,378) 














••NMAI Resource Center 


,0 

















••NMAI Staff Move 











(1001 








••NMAI Mall Museum 


5 


892 














••Adjustment to Base to Reflect FY 2005 Plan 


p 


146 


5 


290 








National Portrait Gallery ,. ' 
















--NPG 


Si 


132 


14 


1.001 


173 


73 


8,244 


' ':.PG Patent Office Building 


'.\ 


^r 


1 


167 








-1/2 SAAM/NPG BIdg. Mgr. 


Q 




















Smithsonian American An Museum 
















--SAAM 


7 


540 


13 


947 


256 


109 


12.388 


**Saam Patent Otftce Building 


p 

















• •Collections Acquisitions 


b 

















-1/2 SAAM/NPG BIdg. Mgr. 























International Art fl/Iuseums 
















Arthur M. Sackler Gallery/Freer Gallery of Art 


3 


342 


6 


576 


197 


60 


5.987 


Cooper-Hewin. National Design Museum 


1 


145 


5 


448 


106 


40 


3.232 


Hirshhorn Museum & Sculpture Garden 


3 





6 


525 


138 


49 


4.288 


National Museum of African Art 


1 


148 


5 


611 


150 


48 


4.715 


Science Museums and Research Institutes 
















National Museum of Natural History 


2 


1,238 


10 


1,098 


1.617 


438 


47,086 


' 'Exhibits Infrastructure 


3 














* 'Collections Care 


D 

















"Research Collection information System 


3 

















* 'Repatriation Program , 


D 














National Zoological Park 


3 


543 


13 


1.300 


595 


195 


17,346 


••Animal Health Initiative 


3 

















• •NZP Information Management System 


b 















Smithsonian Astrophysical Observaton/ 


i' 


370 


3 


340 


634 


124 


22,435 


Smithsonian Center for Materials Research and Education 


?' 





6 


700 


132 


29 


3,674 


Smithsonian Environmental Research Center 


»■ 





5 


273 


105 


34 


3,017 


Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute 


i 


185 


41 


1.938 


327 


242 


11,607 


TOTAL. MUSEUMS AND RESEARCH INSTITUTES 


* 


10.383 


238 


19.186 


6.598 


2.311 


225.423 
















9/11/03. 12:1£ 



r 



SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION FEDERAL BUDGET 

BY PROGRAM AND ACTIVITY 

(Thousands of DollaTsI 



IS) Unit Base Adjustments and Transfers 
Requested Increases and Decreases 





FY 2003 Appropriation 


FY 2004 Request 


Public 


Programs 


Exhibitions 
FTFs Amount 


FY 2004 Request w/ FY 2005 Increases and Decreases 
Programs 

Collections Research Facilities Security 
FTEs Amount FTEs Amount FTEs Amount FTEs A 


mount 


nformation 
FTEs 


Technology 
Amount 


Operations 

FTEs Amount 


Necessary Pay 


FY 2005 Request 
FTEs Amount 


FY 2003 Appropriation 


4.691 


U6.094 








































t 


FY 2004 Request 






5.007 


476.553 


442 


40,751 


487 


48.371 


710 


61.477 


518 63.209 


1.131 


146.541 


1.252 65,697 | 


134 


43,129 


535 


59.740 


12,600 


5,209 


541,515 


MUSEUMS AND RESEARCH INSTITUTES 














































American Museums 

Anacostia Museum/Center for African American History anrj Culture 

• •Adiustment to Base to Reflect FY 2005 Plan 
Archives of American Art 
Center for Folklife and Cultural Hentage 


21 

23 

19 


1.968 

1.790 
1.899 


22 

22 
18 


1.907 

1.849 
1.954 


6 


6 
5 


427 

1101 
430 
642 


3 



9 


263 

(441 

26 

1,019 


6 


9 
2 


447 

22 

868 

164 


1 140 

11 






























1 





64 

3 

64 


5 

6 
2 


566 
18 

525 
65 


62 

65 

43 


22 

22 
18 


1.969 

1.914 
2.247 


National Air and Space Museum 

• •f^repaiationymove of Collections. NASM 
"Kiosks and Exhibit Cases. NASM 

• •Udvar-Hazv Center, NASM 
■ ■ETKi^ttif'n Mstntenanre 

• "Adiustment to Base to Reflect FY 2005 Plan 
National Museum of American Historv 

National Postal Museum 

National Museum of the American Indian 


221 

269 

6 

313 


20.269 

21,559 

650 

33,397 


174 

235 

6 

360 


21.498 

19.767 

667 

38.610 


18 

10 



43 



116 


1.939 

1.409 



(9741 

3.406 

55 

11.183 


37 






50 
1 

48 


4,241 

C 

(494) 



50 



4.231 

110 

5.026 


50 






88 
6 
112 


6.402 






6.866 
464 

8.824 


37 3.714 

u 



17 2,033 











7 

18 








631 



4.992 






1 





.700 

n 

122 




7 





10 


17 


1.440 





974 

1.059 

30 

4.276 


25 





19 


49 


2.062 





1.419 
8 

4.309 


557 

752 
24 

665 


184 

235 

5 

383 


19.235 

20.519 

691 

34.828 


■ "onidnion McnviiiBS 

••IT Infrastructure 
••NMAI Resource Center 
••NMAI Staff Move 

■ -NWAI Mall Museum 

"•Adjustment to Base to Reflect FY 2005 Plan 
















\2 
20 





(3251 


2.517 







6 








67F. 

11461 







1251 







(2.0731 

























(734) 























5 



2, 373, 





892 

146 








5 






(100 



290 








National Portrait Gallery 
-NRG 


64 


4,823 


64 


4,986 


12 


865 


11 


976 


21 


1.597 


5 415 














1 


132 


14 


1.001 


173 


73 


8.244 


■ "NPG Patent Office Butldino 
"1/2 SAAM/NPG BIdg, Mgr, 


15 


772 






























































Smithsonian American Art Museum 
-SAAM 


99 


7.490 


97 


7.739 


27 


2.083 


19 


1.627 


29 


2.236 


2 306 














7 


540 


13 


947 


256 


109 


12.388 


-"SAAM Patent Office Building 










6 


1.093 


6 


3.485 














u 

















u 








• ■Collections Acquisitions 

























II85I 



































-1/2 SAAM/NPG BIdg. Mgr. 


16 


775 






























































International An Museums 














































Arthur M Sackler Gallery/Freer Gallery of An 


71 


6.092 


60 


5.790 


12 


1.163 


20 


1.746 


13 


1.404 


7 528 





31 








3 


342 


5 


576 


197 


60 


6.987 


Cooper Hewitt. National Design Museum 


40 


3.030 


40 


3.126 


4 


248 


5 


429 


10 


745 


2 126 


13 


985 








1 


145 


5 


448 


106 


40 


3.232 


Hirshhorn Museum & Sculpture Garden 


65 


4.693 


49 


4.150 


11 


834 


22 


1.819 


9 


782 








6 


1 


84 








6 


625 


138 


49 


4.288 


National Museum of African Art 


48 


4,435 


48 


4,566 


11 


884 


16 


1.623 


14 


1,187 





1 


113 








1 


148 


5 


611 


150 


48 


4.716 


Science Museums end Research Institutes 














































National Museum of Natural History 


514 


44.690 


436 


43.319 


58 


5.214 


50 


5.023 


168 


14.524 


144 15,804 


4 


418 








12 


1.238 


10 


1.098 


1.617 


438 


47.086 


" "Ewhibit-^ Intrasiruciure 













Ij 


] 


150 









































••Collections Care 






















1 


1,600 



































"Research Collection Information System 
















n 


ri 


r, 


" 


1.600 














ri 


n 


n 


n 








* •RepaiiiatiOn Program 






















(1 ooni 



























National Zoological Parit 


341 


24.128 


190 


15.924 


5 


363 


95 


7.270 


44 


4.205 


28 2.033 








2 


210 


3 


543 


13 


1.300 


595 


195 


17.346 


• "Animal Health Inmanve 
















356 


J 


ctyo 






n 























• "NZP Intoimaiion f^lanagsment System 









































^s 












Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory 


128 


20.984 


124 


21.801 


5 


800 














99 17.191 


16 


3.100 








1 


370 


3 


340 


634 


124 


22.435 


Smithsonian Center for Materials Research and Education 


29 


3.438 


29 


3.542 


4 


613 








5 


469 


14 1.760 




















6 


700 


132 


29 


3.674 


Smithsonian Environmental Research Center 


42 


3.487 


34 


2.912 


1 


77 














28 2.562 




















5 


273 


105 


34 


3.017 


Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute 


242 


11.454 


242 


11.280 


7 


236 














116 6.094 


49 


2.047 


25 


780 


4 


185 


41 


1.938 


327 


242 


11,607 


TOTAL. MUSEUMS AND RESEARCH INSTITUTES 


2.586 


221.823 


2.250 


215.387 


400 


36.534 


407 


40.651 


555 


47.411 


500 53.217 


108 


8.547 


29 


2.896 


74 


10.383 


238 


19.166 


6.598 


2,311 


225.423 



9/11(03. 12 19 PM 



r- 



SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION FEDERAL BUDGET 

BY PROGRAM AND ACTIVITY 

(Thousands of Dollars) 



I SI Unit Base Adjustments and Transfers 
i! Requested Increeses and Decreases 





FY 2003 Appropriation 


FY 2004 Request 


Public 


Programs 


Exhibilions 


Collections 


FY 2004 Request w/ FY 2005 Increases and Decreases 
Programs 

Researcti Facilities Security 


Information Technology 


Operations 


Necessary Pay 


FY 2005 Request 








FTEs 


Amount 


FTEs Amount 


FTEs Amount 


FTEs Amount 


FTEs Amount 


FTEs Amount 


FTEs Amount 


FTEs 


Amount 




FTEs Amount 


PROGRAM SUPPORT AND OUTREACH 






























Outreach 

-Smithsonian institution Traveling Exhibition Service 
-Smithsonian Cenier for Education and Museum Programs 
-Smiihsonian Affiliation Program 
-National Science Resources Cenier 
-Office of Fellowships 


42 4.234 
17 1,709 
3 334 
2 167 
5 327 


43 4,348 
17 1,755 
3 343 
2 173 
5 1,165 



13 
1 
2 





1,111 

85 

173 




43 4,348 

















882 


















1 65 






3 
2 

5 



579 
258 


283 


117 

54 

9 

5 

13 


43 4.465 
17 1,809 
3 352 
2 178 
6 1,978 


■•Felluwvstiips and Scholail; Siudies Program 
-Smithsonian Press 


19 1,558 


19 1,609 


6 


564 








11 906 











2 


139 


62 


19 1,671 


Communico tions 

--VIARC 


6 468 


6 479 


6 


479 


























10 


6 489 


■Office of Public Affairs 


9 879 


9 907 


5 


445 






















4 


462 


28 


13 1,411 
































-Research Equipment 


1,695 


1,706 














1,706 




















1.706 


-Information Resources 


3,282 


3,304 











1,458 











1,846 











3.304 


-Latino Programming 


990 


1,185 





561 


457 


29 


138 




















1.185 


Office of Exhibits Central 


35 2,571 


35 2,659 








31 2,407 

















4 


252 


105 


35 2.764 


Major Scientific Instrumentation 


4,968 


5,000 














5,000 




















5.000 


Museum Support Center 


45 2,453 


28 1,678 











28 1,678 




















63 


28 1.741 


Smithsonian Insiiluiion Archives 


22 1,601 


23 1,664 


3 


192 





14 937 


3 290 











3 


245 


58 


23 1.732 


Smiihsonian InsiituTion Libraries 


109 8,453 


111 8,813 








1 74 


96 7,701 











5 472 


9 


566 


266 


111 9,279 


• ■Libraries Senal Inflation 










'■' 




















TOTAL. PROGRAfVt SUPPORT AND OUTREACH 


314 35,689 


301 36,788 


37 


3,859 


75 7,286 


138 12,003 


15 9,722 








6 2,383 


35 


3,011 


800 


306 39.064 



9/11/03. 12 19 PM 



H 



I 



SI Unit Base Adjustments and Transfei 
Requested Increases and Decreases 



SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION FEDERAL BUDGET 

BY PROGRAM AND ACTIVITY 

(Thousands of Dollars) 





FY 2003 Appropriation 


FY 2004 Request 


FY 2004 Request w/ FY 2005 Increases and Decreases 


FV 2005 Request 


Programs 


Necessary Pay 


Public 


Programs 


Exhibiiic 


ns 


Collecti 


3ns 


Research 


Facilities 


Secu 


ritv 


Information Technology 


Operat 


ons 


SI Activities 


FTEs 


Amount 


FTEs 


Amount 


FTEs 


Amount 


FTEs 


Amoun 


FTEs 


Amount 


FTEs Amount 


FTEs Amount 


FTEs 


Amount 


FTEs 


Amoun 


FTEs 


Amount 




FTEs 


Amount 


ADMINISTRATION 












































Office of the Secfetary 


8 


739 


8 


760 






































8 


760 


21 


8 


781 


Office of Diversity initiatives (Equal Employment & Minority Affairs) 


10 


922 


10 


956 






































10 


956 


37 


10 


993 


Office of General Counsel 


9 


1.221 


10 


1,263 



































15 


10 


1,248 


50 


10 


1,313 


Office of Inspector General 


12 


1,478 


13 


1,531 






































13 


1,631 


55 


13 


1,586 


Offrce Of Policy and Analysis 


4 


425 


4 


439 



































C 


4 


439 


17 


4 


456 


Chief Financial Officer 












































Office of the Chief Financial Officer 


2 


221 


2 


228 






































2 


228 


5 


2 


233 


"SI Audit Costs 





131 





132 









































132 








132 


Office of the Comptroller 


39 


2.846 


37 


2,958 






































37 


2,958 


111 


37 


3,069 


-National Finance Center Costs 





609 





613 









































613 








613 


Office of Contracting 


37 


2,623 


36 


2,791 






































36 


2,791 


110 


40 


3,346 


•"Contracting StaH 










,-| 




















1 113 


l-l 





,-i 














■ 'Facilnies Prngfiim StaM Support 














n 




n 


n 
























-Paper 





178 





179 









































179 








179 


Office of Planning, fyianagement and Budget 


13 


2,156 


9 


2,212 






































9 


2.212 


55 


9 


2.267 


Chief Information Officer 












































Office of Information Technology (w/ChJef Information Officer) 
' "Server Consolioaiion 


89 


24,649 


103 


26,676 




















4 


953 









4 678 

■■) 












51 




13.439 


44 


11.606 


313 


103 


31,991 


* 'Enterprise Resource Plannirjg lERPi - Developmeni 































'J 























"Enterprise Resource Planning (ERPl System 



















Q 








































••Digital Infrastructure 


















































""IT Security Requirements 

• "Oeskiop Workstations/Priniers 

••Web Content Unrt 

































































lo5 
850 












* 'An Collections Information System 

• 'SI Research Information System 
••photo Collections 




























































500 
81 

1 150 



































































--Communications 

' 'Telecommurncations rvlodernization 





10,098 





11,031 



































11.031 














10,880 


Office of Imaging and Photographic Services 


21 


1,691 


21 


1.754 


3 


220 


4 


363 


5 


435 


2 200 




1 90 








3 


227 


3 


219 


61 


21 


1,815 


Director for International An Museums Division 


3 


358 


3 


370 




















1 52 

















2 


318 


14 


3 


384 


Office of the Under Secretary for Science (w/ Diving Pgm) 
■ e Geographic Information System 


8 


1.138 


8 


1.169 


























18 


















80(3 


8 


1.151 


36 


8 


2,005 


Office of Under Secretary for Am fUlus and Nat'l Progs Iw/A&l Exh & AsPacAm Init) 


6 


527 


6 


546 










71 





































Director for National Programs 


3 


285 


3 


295 


































5 


475 


21 


6 


567 


Office of Government Relations 
Office of Human Resources 


5 

62 


442 
4,982 


5 

58 


455 
5.216 








































3 
5 


295 
455 


8 
15 


3 

5 


303 

470 


-Workers' Compensation 

■-■■?': -■■ff'p-snsaiion Increase 





2,639 





2.800 



































58 



5.216 
2,800 


179 



58 



5,395 
3,254 


Office of Special Events and Protocol 

Smithsonian Center for Latino Initiatives 

TOTAL, ADMINISTRATION 


1 
2 

334 


92 
151 

60.601 


1 
3 

340 


95 
218 

64.687 



2 

s 




138 

358 






5 






































1 
1 


95 
80 


3 
7 


1 
3 


98 
225 




















9 


1,388 


3 270 


6 881 








54 


30.363 


262 


37,543 


1.118 


344 


72,355 



9/11/03. 12-19 PM 



I SI Unit Base Adjustments and Transfers 
Requested Increases and Decreases 





















FY 2005 Request 




Necessary Pay 


ation Te 


chnology 


Operations 


SI Activities 


Is 


Amount 


FTEs 


Amount 




FTEs Amount 


F=ACILmES SERVICES '" 














Facilities Maintenance 


3 











654 


385 49.281 


"Facilities Maintenance 


3 















'*NMAI Mall Museum Support 


) 















Facilities Operations, Security and Support 


D 











3,430 


1,863 155,392 


••FY 2005 Utilities Increase 


















••FY 2005 Rent Increase 


D 















"OPS Security Improvements 


D 















••Facilities Program Staff Support 


3 















••Facilities Integration Support 


3 















••riMAi Mall Museum SuDoort 


"1 


'' 


n 


n 






TOTAL. FACILITIES SERVICES 














4.084 


2,248 204,673 


SubtotaL Smithsonian Institution 


4 


43.129 


535 


59.740 


12.600 


5,209 541,515 


FY 2003 Rescission of Prior Years' Unobligated Funds 















FY 2004 Offsening Reduction 















TOTAL. SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION 


4 


43.129 


535 


59.740 


12.600 


5,209 541,515 



Footnotes: 

ID For comparison purposes, the FY 2003 appropriation has been adji 



9/11«)3. 12:19 PM 



Y- 



I SI Unit Base Adjustments and Transfers 
Requested Increases and Decreases 



SMITHSONIAN rNSTITUTION FEDERAL BUDGET 

BY PROGRAM AND ACTIVITY 

(Thousands of Dollars) 



SI Activities 


FY 2003 Appropriation 


FY 2004 Request 














FY 2004 Request w/ FY 2005 Increases 


and Decreases 












FY 2005 Request 
FTEs Amount 


Programs 


Necessary Pay 


Public 

FTEs 


Programs 

Amount 


Ex 

FTEs 


libitions 

Amount 


Collecti 
FTEs 


Amount 


Research 
FTEs Amount 


Facilities 
FTEs Amount 


Security 
FTEs Amount 


Information 
FTEs 


Technology 

Amount 


Operations 
FTEs Amount 


FACILITIES SERVICES "' 










































Facilit.es Mamienance 


220 


16,911 


359 


40.615 























348 37,060 


11 3.555 














654 


385 


49,281 


■ ■r,ii:iipiii^s Matnienance 










u 




V.' 







<J 


u 


.1 7 oL"' 


u u 


■J 


'^-> 













* *NMAI rutall Museum Support 































5 412 























Facilities Operations. Sacurity and Support 


1,237 


125.170 


1.757 


144,220 














8 


675 





592 87.320 


1.157 56,225 














3.430 


1,863 


155,392 


■■r'l 2005 Utilities Increase 
















'■ 















-' 




IJ 










••FY 2005 Rent Increase 




























n 


u ail 


U i> 




















* 'OPS Security Improvements 


































55 3.021 




















•■Faciliiies Program Staff Support 































7 802 























• 'Facilities Integration Support 































4 500 























■ -NMAI Mall Museum Support 
















^ 


n 











40 2,067 























TOTAL, FACILfTIES SERVICES 


1,457 


142,081 


2.116 


184.835 














8 


675 





1.017 137.113 


1.223 62.801 














4,084 


2,248 


204.673 


Subtotal, Smitfisonian Institution 


4.691 


460.194 


5.007 


501,697 


442 


40,751 


487 


48.371 


710 


61,477 


518 63,209 


1.131 146.541 


1.252 65,697 


134 


43,129 


535 


59.740 


12,600 


5.209 


541,515 


FY 2003 Rescission of Prior Years' Unobligated Funds 





(14,1001 








































FY 2004 Offsetting Reduction 











125,144) 




































TOTAL. SrUIITHSONIAN INSTITUTION 


4,691 


446,094 


5,007 


476,553 


442 


40,751 


487 


48.371 


710 


61.477 


518 63,209 


1,131 146.541 


1,252 65.697 


134 


43.129 


535 


59,740 


12.600 


5.209 


541.515 



Footnotes: 

(1) For comparison purposes, the FY 2003 appropriation has been adjusted to reflect the restructuring of the Office of Facilities Engineering and Operations. 



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73 



SALARIES AND EXPENSES 



FY 2003 Appropriation 


$446,094,000 


FY 2004 Estimate 


476,553,000 


FY 2005 Request 


541,515,000 



This section provides specific details about the Institution's Salaries 
and Expenses request for FY 2005. Within the total increases requested, 
approximately 26 percent is attributable to non-discretionary costs for 
sustaining base operations (pay, utilities, communications, and rent), and the 
remainder is for priority program requirements for critical ongoing projects 
within the Institution. These increases are partially offset by non-recurring 
costs of $15,405,000 and program decreases of $1,185,000. 

NON-RECURRING COSTS - Fiscal year 2005 non-recurring costs of 
$1 5,045,000 include the following: 

• National Air and Space Museum ($4,279,000) to reduce one-time funding 
for the preparation, move, and installation of the collection at the Udvar- 
Hazy Center ($3,785,000) and purchase of kiosks, barriers, and exhibit 
cases for the collection ($494,000). 

• National Museum of the American Indian ($6,843,000) to reduce one- 
time funding for technological support for the Resource Center 
($325,000), Web development and Web content management systems 
($40,000), facilities requirements (equipment and furnishings) of the Mall 
Museum ($3,042,000), staff move from rental space to the Mall Museum 
($100,000), technology infrastructure for the Mall Museum 
($2,108,000), systems planning in support of the opening exhibitions 
($230,000), and exhibits development ($998,000). 

• Enterprise Resource Planning System ($3,676,000) to reduce one-time 
funding for the implementation of financial and personnel modules that 
will be deployed by the end of FY 2004. 

• Office of the Chief Information Officer ($247,000) to reduce funding for 
the consolidation of the Institution's applications servers. 



75 



SALARY AND RELATED COSTS - The Institution requests an increase of 
$13,054,000 for higher projected salary and benefits costs in FY 2005 for 
staff as described below. 



Salary and Related Cost Increases: 

Annualization of FY 2004 Pay Raise 5,230,000 

Proposed FY 2005 Pay Raise 7,370,000 

Workers' Compensation 454,000 

Total, Salary and Related Cost Increases $13,054,000 



Annualization of FY 2004 Pay Raise ($5,230,000) - to annualize funding 
of the anticipated 2.0 percent January 2004 pay raise for one-quarter of 
a year. In addition, the request will support the portion of the January 
2003 pay raise that was not included in the FY 2004 request to 
Congress. The initial estimate for the FY 2003 pay raise was based on 
3.1 percent with the final pay raise approved at 4.27 percent. If Congress 
increases the January 2004 pay raise to 4.1 percent as proposed by the 
House, funding for this requirement will be increased by $3,617,000. 

Proposed FY 2005 Pay Raise ($7,370,000) - to fund the anticipated 3.4 
percent January 2005 pay raise for three-quarters of a year. 

Workers' Compensation ($454,000) - to support the provisions of Section 
8147(b) of Title 5, United States Code, as amended April 21, 1976 by 
Public Law 94-273. Workers' Compensation is based on actual costs 
incurred from July 1, 2002 through June 30, 2003, as provided by the 
Department of Labor. With an amount of $2,800,000 in its FY 2004 
Request to Congress for Workers' Compensation, the Institution requests 
a total of $3,254,000 in FY 2005, an increase of $454,000. 



76 



UTILITIES, POSTAGE, COMMUNICATIONS, AND RENT ($1,201,000) - For 

FY 2005, the Institution requests a net Increase of $1,201,000 for utilities, 
postage, communications, and rent, to cover additional costs attributable to 
increased consumption and Inflationary increases, and project needs. The 
following table displays estimates from FY 2003 through FY 2005. Detailed 
explanations of each line item follow. 

Federal Utilities, Postage, Communication, and Rent Costs 

FY 2003-FY 2005 



(Dollars in Thousands) 


FY 2003 
Appropriated^ 


FY 2004 
Estimate 


FY 2005 
Estimate 


Change 


Electricity 


19,410 


21,649 


22,013 


364 


Steam 


4,868 


5,014 


5,109 


95 


Natural Gas 


2,824 


3,388 


3,584 


196 


D.C. Gov't Water/Sewer 


4,137 


3,640 


3,423 


-217 


Other Water & Fuel 


640 


760 


776 


16 


Postage 


2,435 


2,217 


2,264 


47 


Communications 


10,098 


11,031 


10,880 


- 151 


Rent 


10,485 


11,023 


11,874 


851 


Total 


54,897 


58,722 


59,923 


1,201 



^ FY 2003 Appropriation includes 0.65% across-the-board reduction. 

• Electricity ( + $364,000) - Electricity is used to operate large air 
conditioning equipment that cools Smithsonian facilities. In addition to 
ensuring the comfort of staff and visitors, climate control is essential to 
the protection of the national collections. The electricity estimate includes 
an inflationary increase of 2.1 percent ($386,000) offset by anticipated 
reimbursements (-$22,000). 

• Steam ( + $95,000) - The Smithsonian uses steam for heating and 
humidification and to produce hot water in facilities on the Mall and in 
New York City. This request includes a 2.1 percent inflation factor 

($1 13,000) and a net decrease for costs at the National Air and Space 
Museum's restaurant that will be paid directly by the vendors, offset by 
anticipated reimbursements (-$18,000). 

• Natural Gas ( + $196,000) - The estimate includes increases for Patent 
Office Building operations ($125,000), and an inflationary increase of 2.1 
percent over the base ($72,000), offset by anticipated reimbursements 
(-$1,000). 



77 



D.C. Water and Sewer (-$217,000) - The FY 2005 net estimate for 
water and sewer costs is based on cost projections by tlie District of 
Columbia Water and Sewer Authority in April 2003. 

Other Water and Fuel { + $16,000) - Water consumption at satellite 
facilities in Maryland and Virginia and fuel oil consumption should remain 
constant. The FY 2005 estimate includes an inflationary increase of 2.1 
percent ($16,000). 

Postage ($47,000) - The FY 2004 estimate includes an inflationary 
increase of 2.1 percent ($47,000). 

Communications/Networks (-$151,000) - For FY 2005, the Institution 
requests an increase of $439,000. In addition, the request includes a 
redirection of $590,000 that is being requested in the Facilities Capital 
account to support the relocation of telephones from the Arts and 
Industries Building, when the staff currently housed there is moved to a 
new location in FY 2005. This results in a net reduction of $151,000 to 
the communications account. The requested increase of $439,000 
supports the continued efforts of the Office of the Chief Information 
Officer to modernize the Smithsonian's telecommunications infrastructure 
and support voice and data operations and maintenance. The request will 
enable the Smithsonian to deploy the Voice Over Internet Protocol 
telephone system at the National Air and Space Museum's Garber Facility 
and the Museum Support Center in Suitland, MD; the Service Center at 
1111 North Capitol Street; the National Zoological Park, including the 
Conservation Research Center; the National Museum of Natural History; 
the Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and 
Culture; L'Enfant Plaza offices; and the Smithsonian's greenhouses at the 
U.S. Soldiers' and Airmen's Home. 

Rent ($851,000) ~ The request includes $231,000 to pay annual 
increases agreed to as part of lease terms in current contracts. In 
FY 2005, the National Museum of the American Indian will vacate leased 
space in L'Enfant Plaza, shortly after the Mall Museum opens. The 
Smithsonian will use the vacated space for future requirements such as 
space for staff to be relocated from the Arts and Industries Building. The 
request includes $620,000 for increased L'Enfant rental costs (for three- 
fourths of a year). The balance required for one-fourth of a year will be 
requested in FY 2006. 



78 



SECURITY/ANTI-TERRORISM - The Institution requests an increase of 
$3,186,000 and 55 FTEs for security and anti-terrorisnn requirennents at 
Smithsonian facilities, and for information technology security infrastructure. 

• Facilities Operations, Security, and Support (55 FTEs and $3,021,000) 

The requested increase includes 55 FTEs and $3,021 ,000 for the 
Smithsonian to provide additional security staff and support costs 
resulting from the increased security and anti-terrorism requirements 
following the September 1 1, 2001, attacks. The requested resources will 
allow the Institution to respond to security and facility threat 
assessments, and include staff and funds to operate magnetometers and 
perform visitor screening at the National Museum of Natural History, 
National Museum of American History, and the National Air and Space 
Museum, and to develop a Disaster Management Plan. Included within 
this total are $1,049,000 and 21 FTEs for integrating the National Postal 
Museum (NPM) guard force into the Smithsonian-wide guard force by 
providing salaries and benefits for 21 security personnel, and providing 
funds for alarm maintenance at NPM. 

• Chief Information Officer ($165,000) The requested increase of 
$165,000 will allow the Chief Information Officer to upgrade the 
Smithsonian network security infrastructure to ensure that it will continue 
to operate without interruption should there be a hardware or software 
failure or if a system component is compromised. It will also provide for 
secure remote access services, and for operations and maintenance of 
the newly implemented security system. This will allow the Smithsonian 
to distribute digital information to the public, researchers, and other 
customers or partners while minimizing the associated IT security risk. 

NAPA-DRIVEN - The Institution requests an increase of $15,288,000 and 33 
FTEs to support improvements to the Smithsonian's information technology 
infrastructure and facilities program as recommended by the National 
Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) in its July 2001 report. 

• Enterprise Resource Planning System ($3,687,000) The requested 
increase will allow the Institution to continue full implementation of the 
Enterprise Resource Planning system. Phase I, including general ledger, 
accounts payable, and purchasing, was implemented in October 2002, 
and the system will continue to be implemented incrementally through 
FY 2005. The increase will fund a procurement management system and 
operation and maintenance of the already-implemented modules. Due to 
increased costs related to acquisition of the procurement module, the 
request represents an increase over the previous Exhibit 300 estimate for 
FY 2005. 



79 



• Managed Information Technology Infrastructure ($2,586,000) The 

requested increase will provide funds to replace obsolete desktop, 
graphics, and scientific workstations and printers Institution-wide with 
modern systems, on a four-year replacement cycle. The funds will also 
provide for an integrated digital infrastructure in order to make more 
available the Institution's research findings, as well as its 143.5 million 
collection objects, 1 .4 million library items, 2 million film negatives, and 
155 years of archived letters, journals, and illustrations. 

• Facilities Operations, Security, and Support (12 FTEs and $1,415,000) 

The increase for FY 2005 will provide necessary staff support to the 
Smithsonian's expanded facilities program. Included are 8 FTEs and 
$915,000 for the Office of Facilities Engineering and Operations (7 FTEs) 
and Office of Contracting (1 FTE) to provide additional oversight and 
management of the facilities program, and 4 FTEs and $500,000 for zone 
management staff to improve the quality and timeliness of facilities 
operations and maintenance across the Institution. 

• Facilities Maintenance (21 FTEs and $7,600,000) The increase for 
FY 2005 will provide funds to continue to develop and implement the 
structured maintenance program begun with FY 2004 funds, including 
preventive maintenance, periodic testing and inspection, and programmed 
maintenance. This effort will improve reliability of mechanical equipment, 
reduce maintenance and energy costs, and ensure safer facilities for 
visitors and staff, including compliance with National Fire Protection 
Agency and other life-safety codes. The Smithsonian is required by law 
and its own policies to inspect, test, and maintain its fire systems. These 
critical functions have eroded over the past 1 years, to the point where 
the reliability of the systems is questionable, and the risk to visitors, 
staff, and collections has increased. 

STAFFING/OPENING NEW FACILITIES - The Institution requests a net 
increase of $13,762,000 and 99 FTEs for the opening of two new facilities, 
the National Museum of the American Indian and the National Air and Space 
Museum Udvar-Hazy Center, and to prepare for the reopening of the National 
Portrait Gallery and Smithsonian American Art Museum in the renovated 
Patent Office Building. 

• National Museum of the American Indian (68 FTEs and $4,875,000) The 

requested increase includes 23 FTEs and $2,396,000 for the National 
Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) for activities related to the 
opening of the NMAI Mall Museum in September 2004. The requested 
resources will be used to complete the development of exhibits, provide 



80 



education and cultural art programs and visitor services, and complete the 
Mall Museum infrastructure. The Institution is also requesting that NMAI 
be allowed to retain 27 FTEs previously provided for moving the 
collections from New York City, and related funding of $2,536,000, for 
the above purposes. The request also includes 45 FTEs and $2,479,000 
for facilities maintenance and operations, including security, to protect 
and maintain the buildings and grounds of the new Museum. 

• National Air and Space Museum (10 FTEs and $1,409,000) The increase 
for FY 2005 will provide funds needed for full operations of the Udvar- 
Hazy Center. These funds will be used to support education and Web 
activities, including a National Electronic Outreach Distance Learning 
program, school programs, and expanded public and family programs. 

• National Portrait Gallery and Smithsonian American Art Museum (21 FTES 
and $7,478,000) An increase of 21 FTEs and $7,663,000 will allow the 
National Portrait Gallery and Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) 
to begin preparations for the planned July, 2006 reopening of the 
renovated Patent Office Building. Funds are included for exhibition 
preparation, moving and installing objects, gallery installations, developing 
interpretive materials and public programs, preparing and furnishing 
galleries, preparation and move to the new Visible Conservation Center, 
and implementing a nationwide media campaign to herald the reopening 
of the museum to increase visitation. The increase for SAAM is partially 
offset by a decrease of $185,000 to its no-year collections acquisition 
funds. 

OTHER INSTITUTIONAL PRIORITIES - The Institution requests an increase of 
$9,372,000 and 15 FTEs for other Institutional priorities for key areas in 
scientific research, collections information systems, public programming, and 
outreach. The infusion of new resources in these areas will stimulate 
initiatives designed to pursue scientific innovation and discovery and enlarge 
the Smithsonian's audiences. 

• Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage: Festival Infrastructure 
($250,000) The requested increase includes $250,000 for the 
Smithsonian Folklife Festival, to increase the quality and safety of exhibits 
and programming by increasing infrastructure support, including utilities, 
vehicles and equipment, security services, and services to make the 
Festival more accessible. The increase covers services and items 
historically provided by the National Park Service and other units and 
organizations, but no longer supported by them. 



81 



Science Initiatives (3 FTEs and $2,500,000) To respond to the reports of 
the Science Commission, the National Academy of Sciences, and the 
National Academy of Public Administration, increases are included for 
fellowships and scholarly studies (1 FTE and $800,000), for enhanced 
collections care at the National Museum of Natural History (1 FTE and 
$1,500,000), and for increased maintenance of science exhibits (1 FTE 
and $200,000). 

National Zoological Park (5 FTEs and $752,000) The FY 2005 request 
includes an increase to address issues raised in the recent inspections by 
the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the American Zoo and Aquarium 
Association. These include staff and funds to coordinate pest 
management activities at the Zoo, provide for Increased animal 
enrichment programs including improved habitats, and strengthen animal 
health management. These funds and programs are critical to achieving 
full AZA accreditation. 

Collections Information Systems ($4,362,000) A total increase of 
$4,362,000 is requested to provide necessary improvements in several 
key collections information systems at the Institution. Included are the 
ArtCIS system, which serves museum collections management needs and 
provides access to information and images at six art museums; the 
National Zoological Park Information Management System to support 
scientific, conservation-oriented collections management; the Photo 
Collections System, to provide a standard pan-Institutional digital image, 
audio, and video collections system; the Smithsonian Institution Research 
Information System, which advances outreach by supporting the 
management of and access to holdings of 20 Smithsonian libraries, 14 
archives, and other inventory and research databases; a pan-Institutional 
Natural Science Geographic Information System to serve all of the 
Institution's science units; and the National Museum of Natural History's 
Research and Collections Information System, which helps Museum staff 
manage and track collections (totaling 125 million objects and specimens) 
as they are acquired, loaned, or borrowed for research or exhibition. 

Smithsonian Institution Libraries ($200,000) Over the last 15 years, the 
cost of scientific journals has risen faster than inflation rates and the 
Smithsonian Institution Libraries (SIL) has rarely received increases even 
for basic inflation. SIL has coped with diminished buying power for its 
essential research tools through cancellations, inter-library loans, and gifts 
and exchanges, but can no longer keep up. The requested increase is to 
purchase electronic journals, books, and databases that provide critical 
information and research support for the entire Smithsonian community. 



82 



• Information Technology: Web Content Unit (4 FTEs and $976,000) The 

Smithsonian receives over 62 million Web visits a year. The requested 
increase will provide staff and funds to set overall policy for the 
Institution's many websites; establish guidelines on pan-Institutional 
issues such as accessibility, usability, and promoting programs on the 
websites; and defining requirements for new content. Included are one- 
time funds for a complete redesign of the Smithsonian homepage, to 
enhance its usability and increase Web visitation. 

• Administration: Office of Contracting (OCon) Support (3 FTEs and 
$332,000) OCon has been assigned programmatic responsibility for three 
of the initiatives included in the President's Management Agenda: 
competitive sourcing, performance-based service contracting, and e- 
commerce in contracting. The Institution is requesting additional staff to 
effectively develop, implement, and monitor compliance with these 
complex programs. The requested increase includes two analysts and one 
assistant to oversee these contracting initiatives, as well as to respond to 
increased workload associated with the Institution's purchase card 
program. 

PROGRAM DECREASE - In addition to the above increases, the Institution 
proposes a one-time decrease of $1,000,000 to the National Museum of 
Natural History repatriation program. This is an extremely important program 
established in 1991 to implement the requirements of the National Museum 
of the American Indian Act of 1 989. The Act established the right of Native 
American and Native Hawaiian peoples to determine the disposition of 
culturally affiliated human remains and funerary or sacred objects in the 
Smithsonian's collections. Since inception, NMNH has repatriated 
approximately 3,700 skeletal remains and 88,000 associated objects to 48 
Native communities. However, for the past several years, due to hiring 
delays, NMNH has received more funds than it has been able to utilize in a 
timely fashion. Therefore, a one-time decrease of $1,000,000 is possible 
with no impact on the underlying program. The Institution intends to request 
the restoration of these funds in a future budget. 



83 



ANACOSTIA MUSEUM AND CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN 

HISTORY AND CULTURE 





APPLICATION OF OPERATING RESOURCES 


FEDERAL 
APPROPRIATIONS 


GENERAL 
TRUST 


DONOR/SPONSOR 
DESIGNATED 


GOV'T GRANTS 
& CONTRACTS 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FY 2003 
ESTIMATE 


21 


1,968 


3 


486 





59 





61 


FY 2004 
ESTIMATE 


22 


1,907 


2 


390 





109 








FY 2005 
ESTIMATE 


22 


1,969 


2 


342 





300 









STRATEGIC GOALS: INCREASED PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT; ENHANCED 

MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE 

Federal Resource Summary by Performance Objective 



Performance 
Objective 


FY 
FTE 


2004 
$000 


FY 

FTE 


2005 
$000 


CI 
FTE 


lange 
$000 
















Increased Public Engagement: 














Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and other 
pubic programs 


3 


219 


3 


226 





7 


Expand a national outreach effort 


1 


102 


1 


105 





3 


Strengthen the high caliber of Smithsonian 
scholarship in support of public programs 


1 


151 


1 


156 





5 


Develop and bring first-class educational resources 
to the nation 


7 


483 


7 


499 





16 


Improve the stewardship of the national collections 


5 


367 


5 


379 





12 


Enhanced Management Excellence: 














Strengthen an Institutional culture that is customer- 
centered and results-oriented 


2 


315 


2 


325 





10 


Modernize the Institution's financial management 
system and functions 


2 


150 


2 


155 





5 


Recruit, hire, and retain a diverse workforce and 
promote equal opportunity 


1 


55 


1 


57 





2 


Enhance the reputation of the Smithsonian by 
maintaining good relations with the news media and 
with federal, state, and local governments 





65 





67 





2 


Total 


22 


1,907 


22 


1.969 





62 



84 



BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT 

Since its creation in 1 967, tfie Anacostia Museum and Center for 
African American History and Culture has worked to enhance the nation's 
educational and cultural life by exploring and documenting the historical 
experiences and the cultural expressions of people of African descent. To do 
that, the museum offers exhibitions, educational programs, workshops and 
special events at its site in southeast Washington's historic Anacostia 
neighborhood, at other Smithsonian facilities on the National Mali, and at 
strategically selected schools, colleges, and community gathering spots 
throughout the northeastern United States. What started as the nation's first 
federally funded neighborhood museum now is recognized as a national 
resource with a long track record of creating critically acclaimed exhibitions, 
scholarly publications, and innovative Web-based outreach and education. 

The Anacostia Museum is responsible for the acquisition, care and 
preservation of approximately 6,000 objects in a collection dating to the 
early 1800s. This multi-faceted collection includes textiles, works of art, 
archaeological materials, furniture, photographs, audio tapes, film footage, 
diaries, and musical instruments. Research specialties have led to the 
creation of distinctive collections in the following areas: African American 
religion and spirituality, African American visual and performing arts, African 
American family and community life, and contemporary popular culture. 

For Pr' 2005, the estimate includes an increase of $62,000 for 
necessary pay for existing staff. 

MEANS AND STRATEGY 

To achieve the institution's goal of Increased Public Engagement, the 
Museum has created a series of four exhibitions designed to stimulate 
collecting and preservation among individuals, families, communities and 
institutions. Three of them will tour the United States along with a series of 
workshops and lecture-demonstrations covering the basics of collecting and 
preserving. The exhibitions are I, Too, Sing America: Tfie African American 
Personal Narrative in American History, which opens in September 2005 and 
uses diaries, letters, photographs, legal documents and other objects handed 
down through families and others to spotlight the perspective of the African 
American eyewitness in American history; Jubilee: African American Family 
and Community Celebrations, which opens in April 2004, will travel 
nationally through December 2005, and draws on memorabilia and archival 
objects from across the country to explore the many celebrations that are 
unique to African American communities; Sunday Best: African American 
Dress and Adornment Traditions, which will be the first museum-based 



85 



exploration of adornment, dress and social traditions among the slave 
population of the American south; and Close Up in Black: African American 
Film Posters (opening in April 2005), which, along with the accompanying 
film festival, highlights the work of African American film makers and will 
serve as a catalyst to augment the Museum's collection of performing arts 
materials including items documenting the careers of a number of artists. 

In order to provide future generations of scholars and museum visitors 
with material evidence of the African American experience, the Museum has 
created a first-of-its-kind public education initiative designed to teach the 
fundamentals of collecting and preservation to individuals and special interest 
communities such as churches, universities, and social organizations. In a 
related effort the Museum offers workshops and instructional materials on 
genealogical research and recording oral histories. 

The Museum provides an array of programs for students and teachers. 
Created in 1999 to offer cultural enrichment and basic skills instruction in 
three Washington DC churches, the annual Summer Museum Academy will 
expand to a year-round program and include sites in Oklahoma and Texas. A 
teachers' workshop is held each year to introduce educators to new and 
more effective ways of teaching African American history to students in 
grades K-12. Another resource for educators, students and researchers is the 
On-Line Academy, a section of the Museum website featuring virtual 
lectures, detailed information on significant items in the museum's collection, 
and background on past and current exhibitions. 

To support the Institution's goal of Enhanced Management Excellence, 
the Museum will develop and implement results-oriented and customer- 
centered measures for exhibitions, educational programs, and Web-based 
interfaces. The Museum will continue to enhance its press relations through 
the electronic and print media by working with regional press outlets on 
story placement based on newly acquired collections. 

STRATEGIC GOALS AND FY 2005 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE GOALS 

increased Public Engagement 

Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and other public programs 
(3 FTEs and $226,000) 

• Achieve 10% increase in visitation to the Museum 

• Install and present three major exhibitions: /, Too, Sing America, 
Close Up in Black, and Sunday Best 

• install two exhibitions focusing on recent additions to the 
collections 



86 



Expand a national outreach effort (7 FTE and $105,000) 

• Continue tour of the traveling version of Jubilee exhibit 

• Develop two publications related to the Sunday Best and /, Too, 
Sing America exhibitions 

Strengthen the high caliber of Smithsonian scholarship in support of 
public programs (1 FTE and $ 156,000) 

• Create a Scholars Advisory Board made up of scholars, historians 
and specialists in African American history and culture who will 
review research projects for their contribution to the field and 
strength of scholarship, and provide information to improve and 
strengthen research projects 

• Increase scholarly peer review of Museum publications by 5% 
Develop and bring first-class educational resources to the nation 
(7 FTEs and $499,000) 

• Increase participation in Summer Academy and After School 
Academy by 10% 

• Achieve 15% increase in attendance at film-related programs and 
the annual Martin Luther King Jr. Commemorative Program 

• Expand On-Line Academy by 10 additional presentations and 15% 
increase in website visits 

Improve the stewardship of the national collections (5 FTEs and 
$379,000) 

• Add two collections in one of the following categories: Archives, 
Art, Family History, or Community History 

• Continue digitization of collections; increase accessibility by 25% 

Enhanced Management Excellence 

Strengthen an Institutional culture that is customer-centered and 
results-oriented (2 FTEs and $325,000) 

• Develop and implement results-oriented and customer-centered 
measures for all Web interface, exhibitions, and programs 

Modernize the Institution's financial management systems and 
functions (2 FTEs and $155,000) 

• Complete the implementation of detailed project and financial 
tracking to insure optimal management of gifts and grants 

Recruit, hire, and retain a diverse workforce and promote equal 
opportunity (1 FTE and $57,000) 

• Provide expanded human resources development to continue focus 
on career planning, information management, and technology 
training to enable 30% of the staff to develop content and data for 
the Online Academy 



87 



Enhance the reputation of the Smithsonian by maintaining good 
relations with the news media and with federal, state, and local 
governments (0 FTE and $67,000) 

• Ensure that notice of key museum programs and exhibitions gets to 
appropriate news outlet and the public by increasing the use of 
technology 



88 



ARCHIVES OF AMERICAN ART 





APPLICATION OF OPERATING RESOURCES 


FEDERAL 
APPROPRIATIONS 


GENERAL 
TRUST 


DONOR/SPONSOR 
DESIGNATED 


GOV'T GRANTS 
& CONTRACTS 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FY 2003 
ESTIMATE 


23 


1,790 





263 


10 


852 








FY 2004 
ESTIMATE 


22 


1,849 





264 


11 


945 








FY 2005 
ESTIMATE 


22 


1,914 





105 


13 


927 









STRATEGIC GOALS: INCREASED PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT; ENHANCED 

MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE 

Federal Resource Summary by Performance Objective 



Performance 
Objective 


FY 
FTE 


2004 
$000 


FY 
FTE 


2005 
$000 


Ch 
FTE 


lange 
$000 
















Increased Public Engagement: 














Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and other 
public programs 


1 


26 


1 


28 





2 


Expand a national outreach effort 


6 


430 


6 


448 





18 


Improve the stewardship of the national collections 


9 


868 


9 


898 





30 


Enhanced Management Excellence: 














Strengthen an Institutional culture that is customer- 
centered and results-oriented 


2 


249 


2 


254 





5 


Modernize the Institution's financial management 
systems and functions 


2 


137 


2 


142 





5 


Ensure that the Smithsonian's workforce is 
efficient, collaborative, committed, and innovative 


2 


139 


2 


144 





5 


Total 


22 


1,849 


22 


1.914 





65 



BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT 

The mission of the Archives of American Art (AAA) is to collect, 
preserve, and make available primary sources that document the history of 
the visual arts in the United States, foster research, and connect the public 
to a uniquely American cultural heritage. The AAA has the largest collection 



89 



of primary source materials documenting tiie history of the visual arts in the 
United States from the eighteenth century to the present. 

To achieve the Institution's goal of Increased Public Engagement, AAA 
continues to focus on making more of its 1 5 million collections and 
resources available to researchers, completing compelling exhibits, and 
strengthening reference services, visitor feedback, and AAA's website. 
Resources will also be used for a systematic survey of collections, and 
expansion of functionality of AAA's collections management processing 
systems. The goal of Enhanced Management Excellence will be met by 
continuing to improve internal controls and communication, and devoting 
more resources to staff training. 

The FY 2005 budget estimate includes an increase of $65,000 for 
necessary pay for existing staff. 

MEANS AND STRATEGY 

To achieve the Institution's goal of Increased Public Engagement, AAA 
is directing its resources to organizing compelling exhibitions and activities 
that will expand availability to collections and resources via the World Wide 
Web, attract new and larger audiences, foster art history and humanities 
research, and improve the stewardship of its collections. In FY 2005, AAA 
will build on external funding received in FY 2002-2004 from the Beinecke 
Foundation to establish a Digital Imaging Center that will enable AAA to 
increase the number of documents, photographs, and oral histories in its 
growing digital repository. Reference services will be strengthened by 
training staff in system upgrades and in formulating new procedures to 
increase reference services online, and by fully implementing AAA's 
barcoding initiative to control inventory of collections. 

AAA will continue to produce small, compelling exhibitions that reflect 
the richness and cultural diversity of its collections and make tangible the 
firsthand accounts of America's artists, dealers, collectors, and critics, for 
both the general public and the scholarly community. Through strategies 
such as collaborating with other institutions, developing special exhibitions, 
securing multiple venues for exhibitions, and promoting loans of significant 
documents, AAA will increase its audience and strengthen its alliances with 
affiliate museums and other institutions. Exhibitions for FY 2005 include: the 
Annual Gala Benefit Exhibition, Diaries from tfie Archives of American Art (to 
launch the opening of a comprehensive online guide to diaries in the AAA 
collections), Erie Loran: Bay Area l\/lodernist, and Sources for tfie Study of 
Asian American Art. As part of a national outreach effort for the Archives' 
50* anniversary, AAA will collaborate with SITES to develop a traveling 



90 



panel exhibition Treasures from the Archives of American Art, which will tell 
the story of American art from multiple perspectives through primary sources 
such as letters, diaries, photographs, sketchbooks, and the voices of artists 
from the Archives' Oral History Collection. In FY 2005, AAA will also 
develop plans and a production schedule for its new exhibition space in the 
Patent Office Building, as well as goals and benchmarks for evaluating 
exhibitions. Resources will continue to be devoted to presenting online 
versions of exhibitions to reach an even wider audience. 

The goal of Enhanced Management Excellence will be addressed in 
part by continuing to devote resources to performing internal audits on 
various administrative processes, to ensure compliance with all policies and 
procedures, and ensure the integrity of funds. Staff training assessments of 
current work methodologies will continue and processes to ensure efficiency 
across all functions of AAA will be implemented. Additionally, 
communication will be strengthened through additional staff and team 
meetings. 

STRATEGIC GOALS AND FY 2005 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE GOALS 

Increased Public Engagement 

Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and other public programs 
(1 FTE and $28,000) 

• Target 75% of planned exhibitions to appeal to multiple interests 
and new audiences which include the Asian American community; 
California and Bay Area arts community; European Post 
Impressionism; and diaries of all kinds 

• Incorporate survey and visitor feedback into exhibitions and public 
programs and incorporate the feedback within 6 months of the 
survey to improve programming 

Expand a national outreach effort (6 FTEs and $448,000) 

• Digitize approximately 2,000 documents, photographs, and oral 
histories to expand access to collections 

• Add an online guide focused on AAA's papers of and about African 
American artists to reach a diverse audience 

• Increase by 1 0-1 5 the number of online finding aids to make more 
of AAA's collections accessible 

• Develop and implement an online customer survey to ensure 
customer satisfaction 

Improve the stewardship of the national collections (9 FTEs and 
$898,000) 

• Complete second half of systematic survey of collections begun in 
FY 2004 to form a plan for prioritizing collections to be processed 



91 



• Implement Digital Asset Management System to accommodate the 
10% yearly increases in demand for digital images and services via 
the Web, and to comply with the Smithsonian's Technical 
Reference Model for Digital Infrastructure 

• Enhance collections management systems to ensure proper 
preservation, processing, acquisition, and physical and legal control 
of AAA's vast collections through 

o an Sl-wide planned upgrade in FY 2005 to the SIRIS system to 
include fuller integration with AAA's collections database 

o full implementation of the SIRIS Inventory Module for tracking 
and inventorying storage containers 

Enhanced Management Excellence 

Strengthen an institutional culture that is customer-centered and 
results-oriented (2 FTEs and $254,000) 

• Continue to monitor, revise, and enforce AAA's strategic plan to 
ensure 100% alignment with the Institution's plan 

• Enable 50% of employees to attend one or more training courses 
within the year to strengthen workforce capabilities 

Modernize the Institution's financial management systems and 
functions (2 FTEs and $142,000) 

• Implement spending plans for all sources of funds to ensure 
integrity of funds 

• Perform two to three internal audits to ensure compliance with 
internal controls 

Ensure that the Smithsonian's workforce is efficient, collaborative, 
committed, and innovative (2 FTEs and $144,000) 

• Develop methods of communication, such as monthly all staff 
meetings and quarterly management retreats, to ensure 100% of 
employees understand the mission, goals and strategic direction of 
AAA 



92 



CENTER FOR FOLKLIFE AND CULTURAL HERITAGE 





APPLICATION OF OPERATING RESOURCES 


FEDERAL 
APPROPRIATIONS 


GENERAL 
TRUST 


DONOR/SPONSOR 
DESIGNATED 


GOV'T GRANTS 
& CONTRACTS 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FY 2003 
ESTIMATE 


19 


1,899 


11 


1,393 


5 


1,475 








R' 2004 
ESTIMATE 


18 


1,954 


11 


983 


11 


3,600 





39 


FY 2005 
ESTIMATE 


18 


2,247 


11 


983 


5 


1,600 









STRATEGIC GOALS: INCREASED PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT; ENHANCED 

MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE 

Federal Resource Summary by Performance Objective 



Performance 
Objective 


FY 
FTE 


2004 
$000 


FY 
FTE 


2005 
$000 


Ch 
FTE 


lange 
$000 
















Increased Public Engagement: 














Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and other 
public programs 


10 


1,084 


10 


1,356 





227 


Develop and bring first-class educational resources 
to the nation 


5 


642 


5 


655 





13 


Improve the stewardship of the national collections 


2 


164 


2 


170 





6 


Enhanced Management Excellence: 














Modernize the Institution's information technology 
systems and infrastructure 


1 


64 


1 


66 





2 


Total 


18 


1.954 


18 


2,247 





293 



BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT 

The Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage produces research-based 
public programs that promote the understanding and continuity of traditional 
grass-roots regional, ethnic, tribal, and occupational heritage in the United 
States and abroad. The Center maintains the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives 
and Collections, a repository of documentary sound recordings, photographic 
images, and reports deemed a national treasure through the Save America's 
Treasures program. The Center produces the annual Smithsonian Folklife 
Festival on the National Mall every summer— long recognized as the premier 



93 



event of its kind. The Center produces Smithsonian Folkways Recordings, 
which among more than 2,000 published titles includes several Grammy 
award winners. The Center also produces educational materials — websites, 
kits for schools, documentary films, publications, traveling exhibitions, 
conferences, and training programs examining cultural traditions and the 
means of conserving them for the good of communities and the broader 
society. The Center cooperates with federal, state, and international 
agencies to advance the nation's interest in cultural matters. 

For FY 2005, the estimate includes an increase of $293,000, 
including $250,000 for Folklife Festival infrastructure and $43,000 for 
necessary pay for existing staff funded under this line item. 

MEANS AND STRATEGY 

To achieve the Smithsonian's goal of Increased Public Engagement, 
the Center will continue its annual production of the Smithsonian Folklife 
Festival on the National Mall. This museum of living cultural heritage is very 
popular with the public and the media. In 2002 for example, the Silk Road 
Festival drew a record number of visits — over 1 .3 million. The proposed 
2005 Festival programs are on the U.S. Forest Service, Native American 
Basketry, Latino Music, and Oman. In 2004, the Center will also take on the 
added responsibilities of working with the World War 11 Memorial 
Commission to organize a high-quality public event involving hundreds of 
thousands of veterans and their families to mark the Memorial's dedication, 
and working with the National Museum of the American Indian to produce 
their opening ceremonies festival. Both these programs will likely involve 
ongoing work into FY 2005. 

To apply Smithsonian research to its work and collections, the Center 
will continue in 2005 to add to its documentary sound, photographic, and 
ethnographic collections as well as generate new materials through the 
organization of research projects necessary to produce the Festival and 
Smithsonian Folkways Recordings. This material will be added to the 
Center's archives and, where necessary, digitized. Ongoing digitization of the 
archival collection will continue throughout FY 2005. In order to bring 
Smithsonian education resources to the nation, the Center will publish its 
recordings and disseminate them across the country. The Center will 
continue to tour its traveling exhibits, and hopes to complete a film based on 
the Masters of the Building Arts Festival program and make it available to the 
public by the end of FY 2005. The Center will also continue to shift 
resources toward the Web-based distribution of materials and lesson plans to 
increase efficiency and broaden audiences. To better serve the needs of its 



94 



Festival visitors, the Center will use the requested increase of $250,000 to 
provide better services and improve security. 

STRATEGIC GOALS AND FY 2005 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE GOALS 

Increased Public Engagement 

Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions (10 FTEs and $1,356,000) 

• Achieve visitation of 1 million at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival 

• Feature more than 300 musicians and artists from cultural 
communities important to Americans 

• Generate 400 media stories about the Festival 

• Generate 90% approval ratings by the public for the Festival 

• Generate 90% approval ratings by participants in the Festival 
Develop and bring first-class educational resources to the nation (5 
FTEs and $655,000) 

• Generate more than 1 2 million hits on Center webpages 

• Produce at least 1 8 documentary recordings through Smithsonian 
Folkways Recordings distributed nationwide 

• Travel at least two exhibitions generated from the Festival and 
other projects throughout the United States 

Improve the stewardship of the national collections (2 FTEs and 
$170,000) 

• Generate 400 audio recordings, 200 video tapes, 5,000 images, 
and at least 1 00 narrative reports documenting contemporary 
community-based cultural traditions for preparation of the Festival, 
Smithsonian Folkways Recordings, and other Center projects 

• Conserve and preserve 2,000 archival recordings 

Enhanced Management Excelience 

Modernize the Institution's information technology systems and 
infrastructure (1 FTE and $66,000) 

• Coordinate with the central Smithsonian IT system and modernize 
the current tracking system used for Festival planning 

FY 2005 REQUEST - EXPLANATION OF CHANGE 

The FY 2005 budget estimate includes an increase of $293,000 with no 
additional FTEs. Included are an increase of $43,000 in necessary pay for 
existing staff justified in the Non-discretionary Costs section of this budget, 
and a program increase of $250,000 for infrastructure support of the 
Smithsonian Folklife Festival to improve the quality and safety of exhibits 
and programming as follows: 
• ( + $1 29,000) These funds will provide for the rental of service vehicles 

and electrical and gas plumbing services, along with the purchase of 



95 



generators and other equipment that generally has been rented for each 
festival, as well as building materials for public stages. Purchasing the 
equipment will avoid increasing rental costs and permit its use by other 
Smithsonian units and in upcoming pan-Institutional projects. 

• ( + $102,000) This increase is for security services, security fencing and 
lighting, mandated services for disabled visitors (such as sign language 
interpreters), and first aid. The increase covers services and items 
historically covered by the National Park Service and other units and 
organizations, but no longer supported by them. 

• ( + $19,000) This increase will provide for necessary updating of 
computer, office, and telephone lines and functions that help support the 
Festival, as well as the processing of research materials and Festival 
documentation for public dissemination. 

If the FY 2005 request is not allowed, the Festival will not be able to 
provide the infrastructure support needed to attract and serve visitors, nor 
attract the non-government support needed to fund actual program costs. 
The result will be a much smaller, much diminished Festival with lower 
visitation, and less impact on both public education and the cultural 
communities featured at the Festival. 



96 



NATIONAL AIR AND SPACE MUSEUM 





APPLICATION OF OPERATING RESOURCES 


FEDERAL 
APPROPRIATIONS 


GENERAL 
TRUST 


DONOR/SPONSOR 
DESIGNATED 


GOVT GRANTS 
& CONTRACTS 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FY 2003 
ESTIMATE 


221 


20,269 


36 


3,180 


35 


8,606 


5 


674 


FY 2004 
ESTIMATE 


174 


21,498 


38 


4,514 


35 


5,316 


4 


484 


FY 2005 
ESTIMATE 


184 


19,235 


38 


4,029 


20 


1,794 


5 


712 



STRATEGIC GOALS: INCREASED PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT; STRENGTHENED 
SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH; ENHANCED MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE 

Federal Resource Summary by Performance Objective 



Performance 
Objective 


FY 
FTE 


2004 
$000 


FY 
FTE 


2005 
$000 


Cf 
FTE 


lange 
$000 
















Increased Public Engagement: 














Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and other 
public programs 


51 


4,973 


53 


5,298 


2 


325 


Expand a national outreach effort 


4 


671 


12 


1,013 


8 


342 


Improve the stewardship of the national collections 


53 


7,713 


53 


3,998 





-3,715 


Deliver highest quality visitor services 


7 


598 


7 


640 





42 


Strengthened Scientific Research: 














Strengthen capacity in science research 


2 


242 


2 


312 





70 


Conduct focused scientific research programs that 
are recognized nationally and Internationally 


6 


402 


6 


670 





268 


Develop the intellectual component of the 
collections by performing collections-based studies 


23 


2,450 


23 


2,520 





70 


Enhanced Management Excellence: 














Strengthen an Institutional culture that is customer- 
centered and results-oriented 


19 


3,651 


19 


3,916 





265 


Modernize the Institution's information technology 
systems and infrastructure 


9 


798 


9 


868 





70 


Total 


174 


21,498 


184 


19,235 


10 


-2,263 



97 



BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT 

The mission of the National Air and Space Museum (NASM) is to 
preserve and display aeronautical and space-flight equipment and data of 
historical significance to the progress of aviation and space flight, develop 
educational materials and conduct programs to increase the public's 
understanding of the development of aviation and space flight, and conduct 
and disseminate new research in the study of aviation and space flight and 
related technologies. 

In Pr' 2005, the National Air and Space Museum will be fully 
operational as one museum with multiple locations: the flagship building on 
the National Mall; the Udvar-Hazy Center; and the Garber facility. The 
National Air and Space Museum provides access to the nation's aviation and 
space history to 9-10 million on-site visitors per year on the Mall and over 
140,000,000 virtual visitors through our broadcast and webcast educational 
programming. Between 3-4 million visitors are expected to visit the Udvar- 
Hazy Center per year. 

For FY 2005, the estimate includes a program increase of 10 FTEs and 
$1,459,000 for full operations of the Udvar-Hazy Center and exhibit 
maintenance, an increase of $557,000 for necessary pay for existing staff 
funded under this line item, and a decrease of $4,279,000 for one-time 
costs to move and install artifacts at the Udvar-Hazy Center. 

MEANS AND STRATEGY 

NASM's primary activities are aimed at meeting the goal of Increased 
Public Engagement. During FY 2005, NASM will open the Air Transportation 
gallery and begin planning the next two galleries. Exploring ttie Planets and 
Living and Worthing in Orbit. Other galleries, including Apollo to the Moon, 
will be evaluated for upgrades. Installation of new artifacts at the Udvar- 
Hazy Center will continue through FY 2007. 

To ensure that the Museum exhibits meet highest standards, NASM 
will expand its pilot exhibit evaluation program, which will allow NASM to 
test exhibit, educational, and public program concepts early in the 
development cycle. This will ensure that visitor and external organizational 
feedback is incorporated at the earliest and most cost-effective time. 

In FY 2005, NASM will focus on an integrated website and on-site 
visitor information feature for the Udvar-Hazy Center. This feature, currently 
called Flight Plan, will allow visitors to plan their visit on the Web, and to 
customize and extend their Museum experience— from pre-visit planning, to 



98 



on-site Museum tours, to post-visit learning. Visitor services programs will 
also be expanded at the flagship building and Udvar-Hazy Center. Unique 
within the Smithsonian Institution system, NASM will offer an integrated 
visitor information/venue ticketing opportunity for visitors by providing time- 
ticketing for selected venues. In addition, the bus system supported by the 
Commonwealth of Virginia will provide transportation between the locations. 

As a national facility and regional destination, the Udvar-Hazy Center 
has a unique opportunity to work with the region and the Commonwealth of 
Virginia to support educational and cultural programs. Educational 
programming is divided into three components, each of which addresses a 
specific educational need that meets regional and national educational 
program requirements or provides outreach to underserved audiences. 
School-related programs support school groups visiting the Museum by 
supplying classroom materials and providing interactive opportunities through 
Discovery Stations, which have been very successful at the Museum's 
flagship building on the Mall. An expanded program at the Udvar-Hazy 
Center will provide visitors with the unique opportunity to Stop, Look, and 
Discover historical materials, tools, and models related to specific artifacts 
and themes. National Electronic Outreach focuses on school-based distance 
learning. These programs will continue to grow, with demands for 
improvement in both the quality and frequency of programs. 

Public Programming includes Family Days, designed to offer enriching 
educational experiences that enhance the museum visit and commemorate 
important events in air and space. These events are aimed at educating and 
inspiring parents to become more involved in cultivating an appreciation in 
their children of aviation, space exploration, science, and history. Day camps 
and family workshops reach underserved audiences within the metropolitan 
Washington DC area. According to audience assessments, the number one 
element audiences would like to see at the Udvar-Hazy Center is interactive 
exhibits based on NASM's collections. These might include experiments from 
the Mall Museum's How Things Fly gallery, a Space Shuttle Training 
simulator and Mission Control simulator, an interactive Spacelab module, or 
an aircraft training simulator. The final element of public programming is self- 
guided tours, which are low cost, easily reproduced and edited handout 
sheets that allow the targeting of different content to different audiences. 

To reach diverse national audiences, NASM has an active loan 
program of more than 600 aviation and space artifacts and electronic 
outreach efforts that result in more than 1 40 million hits on the website each 
year. In order to make information on the collection available to the public, 
the Museum intends to migrate collections information to a publicly 
accessible website. The curatorial databases that have been constructed 



99 



contain extensive information on the history and provenance of each artifact, 
and the best way to offer more of this in-depth information to the public is 
through electronic means. 

To achieve Strengthened Scientific Research, NASM's Center for Earth 
and Planetary Studies conducts basic research related to planetary 
exploration with an emphasis on Mars, and curates galleries and public 
offerings in the space sciences. With the emphasis on Mars as the next 
potential site with the possibility of extraterrestrial life, researchers are 
concentrating on studies related to the early Martian environment and are 
involved in NASA missions to that planet. 

To achieve Enhanced Management Excellence, NASM is continuing 
the development of a single infrastructure to support the flagship building 
and the Udvar-Hazy Center. NASM will rely on contracted facilities 
management, information technology, security, bus service, and parking for 
the Udvar-Hazy Center. The Udvar-Hazy Center will be 30 miles from central 
Smithsonian support services. To maintain the facility in a cost-effective 
manner, a contracted workforce that can draw on the necessary short-term 
specialized maintenance skills will free NASM from maintaining that skill base 
for a single facility. 

STRATEGIC GOALS AND FY 2005 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE GOALS 

Increased Public Engagement 

Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and other public programs 
(53 FTEs and $5,298,000) 

• Plan the upgrades to Exploring the Planets gallery, including draft 
script and designs 

• Provide curatorial input to continuing upgrades of Udvar-Hazy 
Center exhibits, including at least two small object cases and two 
exhibit stations 

• Install two exhibit kiosks, barriers, and exhibit cases at the Udvar- 
Hazy Center 

• Populate the McDonnell Space Hangar of the Udvar-Hazy Center 
with outstanding artifacts, effectively interpreted through labels, 
exhibit stations, and interactive kiosks 

• Develop a major new exhibit on the history, technology, and 
operations of the Space Shuttle and the International Space Station 

• Upgrade the Apollo to the Moon exhibit with revised graphics and 
improved information 

Expand a national outreach effort (12 FTEs and $1,013,000) 

• Implement three educational programs and scholarly events relating 
to aviation, space history, and planetary science through 



100 



involvement with school systems and in partnerships with outside 
organizations 

• Prepare two new teaching posters, self-guided tour materials, 
docent-training materials and related Museum-based presentation 
materials 

• Develop an expanded family and underserved audience educational 
program including family days, camp days, and special summer 
programs 

• Develop an interactive educational program Including Discovery 
Stations at the Udvar-Hazy Center 

• Develop a strong distance-learning electronic outreach program 
through regularly broadcasted programming and webcasting by 
broadcasting events over the Internet 

Improve the stewardship of the national collections (53 FTEs and 
$3,998,000} 

• Continue collections preparation and move up to 29 major space 
and 29 major aeronautical artifacts to the Udvar-Hazy Center 

Deliver the highest quality visitor services (7 FTE and $640,000) 

• Develop the Flight Plan Web-based interactive concept allowing 
visitors to plan their visits online before arrival at the Museum 

Strengthened Scientific Research 

Strengthen capacity in science research (2 FTEs and $312,000) 

• Increase emphasis on Mars research by gaining at least two new 
competitive research grants 

• Support 3-5 persons in research using competitively reviewed 
proposals and grants 

Conduct focused scientific research programs that are recognized 
nationally and internationally (6 FTEs and $670,000) 

• Provide outreach for Mars missions that will be shown to the public 
through video displays both on monitors in the Museum and on 
NASM's website 

• Publish at least four peer-reviewed professional papers documenting 
the role of Mars' tectonic and climate history 

• Use Mars Odyssey and Mars Global Surveyor data to understand 
the geologic history of Mars by analyzing against similar Mars 
studies and relevant information on Earth's geological history 

Develop the intellectual component of the collections by performing 
collections-based studies (23 FTEs and $2,520,000) 

• Collect at least three significant artifacts in space history and 
undertake their proper conservation, documentation, display, and 
interpretation 

• Provide leadership among science/technology and aerospace 
museums by spearheading efforts to develop a National Standards 



101 



and Collections Strategy and by raising awareness and support 
through the Mutual Concerns of Air and Space Museums 
Conference 

Enhanced Management Excellence 

Strengthen an Institutional culture that is customer-centered and 
results-oriented (19 FTEs and $3,916,000) 

• To provide state-of-the-art facilities and security support, manage 
facilities integration including prime and subsidiary contractors and 
security outsourcing contracts for the Udvar-Hazy Center 

• Maintain an excellent working relationship with NASM stakeholders 
including federal, state, local, and business constituencies by 
providing briefings at least annually 

Modernize the Institution's information technology systems and 
infrastructure (9 FTEs and $868,000) 

• Provide state-of-the-art information on the collections by adding 
additional documentation to 30 artifacts and upgrading the 
collection information system as NASM continues its move to the 
Udvar-Hazy Center 

FY 2005 REQUEST-EXPLANATION OF CHANGE 

The FY 2005 budget estimate includes a net decrease of $2,263,000 
and an increase of 10 FTEs. Included are an increase of $557,000 for 
necessary pay for existing staff and a decrease of $4,279,000 for one-time 
costs, both of which are justified in the Non-discretionary Costs section of 
this budget. NASM is seeking a program increase of 10 FTEs and 
$1 ,459,000 to support operations during the first full operational year at the 
Udvar-Hazy Center at Dulles, and for exhibits upgrades and maintenance. 
The increases are as follows: 

• ( + $90,000, + 1 FTE) Prior experience with a temporary on-staff program 
evaluator provided immediate visitor feedback on exhibit development, 
planned programs, and related offerings. Incorporating an in-house 
program evaluator/program analyst will ensure that visitor reaction is 
incorporated early into the planning process, reducing overall exhibit and 
educational development costs. 

• ( -I- $185,000, +2 FTEs) This request will provide services for a crucial 
component of the education mission: to support school groups visiting 
the Museum. The Education Division needs an instructional designer to 
produce materials for classroom and museum use, and an annual 
appointment for a teaching fellow who will improve educational materials 
and provide valuable in-service training to currently-practicing educators. 
The existing pre-visit materials are mostly out of stock and out of date 
with current teaching practices. For the Udvar-Hazy Center, new teaching 



102 



posters for the classroom will provide background information for the 
teachers and classroom activities to prepare the students for a good 
learning experience in the Museum. In addition, new self-guided tour 
information will provide out of town visitors with a structure and focus 
for their visit. The instructional designer with professional writing and 
management experience will work with the teacher fellow and teacher 
advisors, who have current classroom experience, to develop the much 
needed instructional materials to support the thousands of students who 
visit each year. 

( + $99,000, + 1 FTE) Surveys have shown visitors want to interact with 
knowledgeable staff and volunteers. As a flagship building pilot program, 
the Discovery Stations have been an overwhelming success. A museum 
program specialist is requested for this expanded program at the Udvar- 
Hazy Center, which will provide visitors with historical materials, tools, 
and models related to specific artifacts and themes. A full-time manager 
will recruit and train volunteers to interact with the public at these hands- 
on Discovery Stations, which deliver educational content that is 
interesting, topical, and meets visitors at differing age and academic 
levels. The stations are wheeled into place and, under the guidance of 
trained staff, visitors experience what it was like to be an aviator in the 
1 930s, how it feels to wear a space suit, or how to build a homemade 
telescope. The manager will work with exhibits to develop an overall look 
for the stations that will better represent the Museum and attract visitors, 
(-f- $146,000, +2 FTEs) A program specialist and an education specialist 
are required to support the development and management of Family 
Days, hands-on interactive activities for visiting families; day camps and 
family workshops to reach underserved audiences within the metropolitan 
DC area; expanded hands-on interactives, including experiments and 
simulators; and self-guided tours, the easily reproduced handout sheets 
based on the collections, targeted to different audiences. 
( -I- $889,000, -1-4 FTEs) Four information technology specialists are 
needed to support the Udvar-Hazy interactive kiosks, educational Web 
broadcasts, and expanded research and public access to collections 
information. The interactive kiosks will provide unique information on the 
major artifacts at the Udvar-Hazy Center. Based on NASM's prototype 
under visitor review in FY 2003, NASM will extend this program to at 
least 20 major artifacts at the Center. Integrating the Visitor Services 
concepts into NASM's Web outreach will provide visitors easy access to 
plan their visits and arrange for tours and tickets in advance of arrival. In 
addition, the Museum will expand educational outreach via the Web to 
include curriculum to support the programs. The funds will also provide 
for design support and tools needed to develop the interactive kiosks. 
(-1- $50,000) To keep pace with new space missions and stay current 
with the latest discoveries, the three science galleries at NASM must be 



103 



upgraded with electronic displays. These displays will allow the Museum 
to quickly update the information presented in the galleries with the latest 
images or scientific discoveries. To achieve and sustain excellence in 
exhibitions and public programming in line with NASM's goals and 
national standards, exhibits must be constantly maintained and upgraded. 

If the FY 2005 request is not allowed, NASM will not be able to fully 
operate its two locations, the flagship building on the Mall and Udvar-Hazy 
Center, as planned. Fewer exhibits and education programs in place will 
mean lower visitation than projected, which will also affect revenues. This in 
turn will affect the Museum's ability to achieve the objective of providing the 
public with a broader understanding of the significance of America's role in 
aviation and space history. Resources may need to be shifted from research 
in order to move forward with priority needs, which will affect the quality 
and sustainability of ongoing collaborative research efforts. 



104 



NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AMERICAN HISTORY, BEHRING 

CENTER 





APPLICATION OF OPERATING RESOURCES 


FEDERAL 
APPROPRIATIONS 


GENERAL 
TRUST 


DONOR/SPONSOR 
DESIGNATED 


GOV'T GRANTS 
& CONTRACTS 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FY 2003 
ESTIMATE 


275 


22,209 


16 


1,808 


99 


22,261 


37 


2,949 


FV 2004 
ESTIMATE 


241 


20,434 


8 


1,554 


75 


25,757 


39 


2,870 


FY 2005 
ESTIMATE 


241 


21,210 


8 


1,392 


51 


11,795 


39 


2,870 



National Museum of American IHistory, Behring Center 

STRATEGIC GOALS: INCREASED PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT; ENHANCED 

MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE 

Federal Resource Summary by Performance Objective 



Performance 
Objective 


FY 
FTE 


2004 
$000 


FY 

FTE 


2005 
$000 


Ch 
FTE 


ange 
$000 


Increased Public Engagement: 














Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and 
other public programs 


64 


5,458 


64 


5,666 





208 


Strengthen the high caliber of Smithsonian 
scholarship in support of public programs 


59 


4,277 


59 


4,440 





163 


Develop and bring first-class educational 
resources to the nation 


44 


4,090 


44 


4,246 





156 


Improve the stewardship of the national 
collections 


28 


2,352 


28 


2,441 





89 


Deliver the highest quality visitor services 


12 


992 


12 


1,029 





37 


Enhanced Management Excellence: 














Ensure that the Smithsonian workforce is 
efficient, collaborative, committed, and 
innovative 


17 


1,673 


17 


1,737 





64 


Recruit, hire, and retain a diverse workforce 
and promote equal opportunity 


11 


925 


11 


960 





35 


Total 


235 


19,767 


235 


20,519 





752 



105 



BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT 

The National Museum of American History, Behring Center (NMAH) 
dedicates its collections and scholarship to inspiring a broader understanding 
of our nation and its many peoples. It creates learning opportunities, 
stimulates imaginations, and presents challenging ideas about the country's 
past. This mission statement serves as a guide to NMAH staff as they 
develop public programs, open new and update existing exhibitions, conduct 
research, and enrich the collections. 

To achieve the Institution's goal of Increased Public Engagement, 
NMAH is presenting a wide range of compelling, innovative exhibitions both 
on site and through traveling exhibitions in partnership with the Smithsonian 
Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES); developing and refining 
affiliations and seeking strategic collaborations to bring NMAH scholarship, 
collections, and programs to a national audience; continuing to develop 
public programs specifically to attract new and under-served audiences; and 
renovating the public spaces of the Museum in accordance with the 
recommendations of the FY 2002 Blue Ribbon Commission regarding visitor 
experiences, orientation, and outreach. 

For FY 2005, the estimate includes an increase for $752,000 for 
necessary pay for existing staff funded under this line item. 

MEANS AND STRATEGY 

To achieve the Institution's goal of Increased Public Engagement, 
NMAH will present a wide range of compelling, first class exhibitions and 
exhibition-related programs during FY 2005, including Price of Freedom, a 
permanent 1 8,000-square-foot exhibition opening in November 2004, that 
replaces the existing Armed Forces History Hall. The exhibition uses 
multimedia technology and historical artifacts to present the story of the 
price the nation has paid to maintain its freedom. The 50th anniversary of 
the Salk polio vaccine and its role in eliminating a debilitating disease will be 
presented in the temporary exhibition Polio. Public engagement with 
exhibition-related programs continues with specific programs associated with 
exhibitions such as America On The l\/love, a 26,000-square-foot 
transportation exhibit; Bon Appetit: Julia Child's Kitchen at the Smithsonian, 
the famous chef's kitchen collected by the Museum in 2001 and 
reconstructed in the Museum's galleries; and the 50th anniversary exhibition 
on the Brown v. Board of Education decision and its impact. In partnership 
with SITES, popular exhibitions such as September 1 1 , First Ladies and the 
The American Presidency start and/or continue their tours throughout the 
country. 



106 



The Museum will continue to present progranns to attract new and 
underserved audiences. These will include performances during Hispanic 
Heritage Month and Asian Pacific American Month, programs in African 
American culture, and music programs and concerts performed by the 
Smithsonian's Jazz Masterworks Orchestra and the Smithsonian's Chamber 
Music Society. A wide variety of educational programming and products, 
from curriculum materials and electronic fieldtrips to interactive Web 
experiences and Hands On History activities, will complement the upcoming 
Price of Freedom exhibition and will be made available to visitors, schools, 
and audiences around the country. Our award-winning website, recently 
redesigned, will continue to be an attraction to electronic visitors as we 
launch sites for the Price of Freedom permanent exhibition as well as the 
continued launching of sites associated with specific collections. 

The NMAH Public Spaces Renewal Program, the objective of which is 
to modernize exhibitions and improve visitors' experience and orientation, 
will include behind-the-scenes research, design, conservation, and planning 
for the reinstallation of the Star-Spangled Banner in Flag Hall and the 
development of a 20,000-square-foot milestone introductory exhibition on 
American history. The renovation program will modernize and upgrade fire 
detection and alarm systems, improve life safety and fire protection systems, 
improve elevator and escalator service, relocate and upgrade public restroom 
facilities, and continue the planning and design of the South entrance 
pavilion. 

STRATEGIC GOALS AND FY 2005 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE GOALS 

Increased Public Engagement 

Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and other public programs (64 
FTEs and $5,666,000) 

• Open Price of Freedom permanent exhibition 

• Open temporary exhibitions on racing cars and polio 

• Complete design and begin demolition and construction for the 
permanent American history introductory exhibition America's 
Stories 

• Oversee work on demolition of Flag Hall in preparation for the 
reinstallation of the Star-Spangled Banner 

Strengthen the high caliber of Smithsonian scholarship in support of 
public programs (59 FTE's and $4,440,000) 

• Complete research on two permanent and two temporary 
exhibitions 

• Complete research on six public programs 



107 



• Establish websites for all major exhibitions opening in FY 2005, to 
include websites for Price of Freedom, America's Story, and the 
Star Spangled Banner exhibitions 

• Establish websites on two museum collections 

Develop and bring first-class educational resources to the nation (44 
FTEs and $4,246,000) 

• Complete all educational research, exhibit concept, and design 
development for the exhibition Price of Freedom 

• Complete initial educational research, exhibit concept, and design 
development for the exhibition American Stories 

• Execute plans for Latino Programming during Hispanic Heritage 
Month by developing and presenting Latino films, documentaries, 
and sponsoring speeches by influential Latino leaders 

• Hold continuing programs for Black History Month to include the 
Annual Jazz Appreciation Month, the Duke Ellington Youth Festival, 
and the annual Martin Luther King, Jr., commemoration 

• Present films that explore the Asian Pacific American experience in 
America, including Chinatown Files and Journey of Honor 
sponsored by the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Committee 

Improve the stewardship of the national collections (28 FTEs and 
$2,441,000) 

• Migrate 45,000 legacy data records and digitize a minimum of 
6,000 additional object images and load the records and images 
into the Museum's collections information system 

Deliver the highest quality visitor services (12 FTE's and $1,029,000) 

• Continue implementation of the Public Spaces Renovation Program 
with Facilities Capital funding, to improve interior space, renovate 
restrooms, elevators, and escalators, and enhance the quality of 
visitors' experiences 

Enhanced Management Excellence 

Ensure that the Smithsonian workforce is efficient, collaborative, 
committed, and innovative (17 FTE's and $1,737,000) 

• Review and analyze the results of the restructuring of the 
collections and research staff and identify and implement any 
changes 

• Review and analyze the results of the organizational restructuring 
of the outreach programs of the Museum and identify and 
implement any changes 

Recruit, hire and retain a diverse workforce and promote equal 
opportunity (11 FTE's and $960,000) 

• Complete two recruiting trips to minority colleges and universities 



108 



Advertise 80% of staff positions above tlie grade of GS-13 in 

media that will normally guarantee a widely diverse population of 

candidates 

Continue diversity training programs and ensure that 100% of staff 

members attend 



National Postal Museum 

STRATEGIC GOALS: INCREASED PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT; ENHANCED 

MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE 

Federal Resource Summary by Performance Objective 



Performance 
Objective 


FY 
FTE 


2004 
$000 


FY 
FTE 


2005 
$000 


Change 
FTE $000 
















Increased Public Engagement: 














Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and other 
public programs 


1 


113 


1 


115 





2 


Expand a national outreach effort 


1 


112 


1 


114 





2 


Improve the stewardship of the national collections 


4 


349 


4 


369 





20 


Deliver the highest quality visitor services 





55 





55 








Enhanced Management Excellence: 














Modernize the Institution's information technology 
systems and infrastructure 





38 





38 








Total 


6 


667 


6 


691 





24 



BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT 

The National Postal Museum (NPM), through its collection and library, 
is dedicated to the preservation, study, and presentation of postal history 
and philately. NPM uses research, exhibits, education, and public programs 
to make this rich history available to a wide and diverse audience. 

To achieve the Institution's goal of Increased Public Engagement, NPM 
is focusing its resources on installing new philatelic and history exhibits, 
fostering improved affiliations with the philatelic community, and providing 
Web access to the national philatelic collection. Additional resources will be 
directed to maintaining NPM's information technology systems and 
infrastructure requirements to meet the goal of Enhanced Management 
Excellence. While specific annual goals have been identified for each 
performance objective, the accomplishment of these goals will require the 
use of non-federal resources made available to the Museum. 



109 



The FY 2005 budget estimate includes an increase of $24,000 for 
necessary pay for existing staff funded under this line item. 

MEANS AND STRATEGY 

To achieve the goal of Increased Public Engagement, NPM is directing 
its resources toward initiatives that will increase visitation to both the 
Museum and its website. In FY 2005, NPM will install two temporary 
philatelic exhibits to attract collectors and philatelists to the Museum. NPM's 
featured history exhibits will include a permanent airmail exhibit and the 
beginning design phase for the Postal Automation Theatre, which will 
provide visitors with a broader understanding of the history of postal 
automation and explore the reality of moving the mail. New history exhibits 
will allow the museum to reach new and diverse audiences by offering a 
window on American history with a personal view. Since visitors have the 
opportunity to personalize their experience through interactive kiosks and 
displays, NPM will maintain exhibition hardware to ensure that all 
technology-based exhibitions— such as What's In The Mail For You?—xema\u 
operational and available for public use. 

In FY 2005, NPM will debut eMuseum providing Web access to the 
national philatelic collection. The online collections information system is 
expected to increase the number of visitors to the Museum's website by 
providing high-resolution images and comprehensive information on the 
national collection. Due to a generous gift, eMuseum will also become a 
featured program in the Ford Education Center scheduled to open in 
FY 2004. With the implementation of eMuseum, NPM is dedicated to 
increasing the number of collections records and digital images added to its 
state-of-the-art collections management systems. 

In FY 2005, NPM will continue to build and improve its working 
relationships with the philatelic community through information sharing and 
special collaborations. Through its affiliations and improved relations, NPM 
can further promote the Museum and its programs to a wide and diverse 
audience. 

In FY 2005, NPM will create a survey program to assess the quality of 
visitors' experience. NPM will dedicate resources to survey programs that 
focus on Increasing the number of visitors and monitoring the quality of 
exhibitions and programs provided to the public. 

The goal of Enhanced Management Excellence will be accomplished by 
modernizing NPM's information technology systems and infrastructure. NPM 



110 



will replace and maintain network Inardware and related computer systems 
that support both the administrative and programmatic needs of the 
Museum. 

STRATEGIC GOALS AND FY 2005 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE GOALS 

Increased Public Engagement 

Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and other public programs 
(1 FTE and $115,000) 

• Install two temporary philatelic exhibits in the Philatelic Gallery to 
attract collectors and philatelists to the Museum 

• Install a new permanent airmail exhibit to attract new audiences 
outside of the normal stamp enthusiasts by appealing to different 
interests, such as history and aviation 

• Begin design phase of permanent Postal Automation Theatre to 
provide visitors with a broader understanding of the story of postal 
automation and present new perspectives on the way America 
moves the mail 

• Replace exhibition hardware and related interactives to ensure that 
all technology-based exhibitions remain operational 

Expand a national outreach effort (1 FTE and $114,000) 

• Continue to build and improve affiliations with the philatelic 
community through information sharing and collaborations to 
promote the Museum and its programs to a wider and more diverse 
audience 

• Increase visitor traffic and website hits by 1 percent, offering the 
best of philately and research to enthusiasts worldwide 

• Debut eMuseum, an online collections information system, 
providing the general public Web access to the national philatelic 
collection 

Improve the stewardship of the national collections (4 FTEs and 
$369,000) 

• Acquire 250 stamp issues missing from the national collection to 
serve the needs of scholars, philatelists, and collectors 

• Add 5,000 collection records to The Museum System (TMS) 
annually to document recent acquisitions and to make more of the 
collection available 

• Create 5,000 high resolution digital images annually to make more 
of the collection available 

• Create 2,000 enhanced records and images for the initial phase of 
eMuseum to increase visitor Web access and attract new and 
diverse audiences 



111 



Deliver the highest quality visitor services (0 FTEs and $55,000) 

• Create a survey program to assess the quality of the visitor 
experience to ensure that the Museum is offering programs and 
exhibitions that are of interest to the public 

Enhanced Management Excellence 

Modernize the Institution's information technology systems and 
infrastructure (0 FTEs and $38,000) 

• Replace and maintain network hardware and related computer 
systems that support general office functions 



112 



NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN 





APPLICATION OF OPERATING RESOURCES 


FEDERAL 
APPROPRIATIONS 


GENERAL 
TRUST 


DONOR/SPONSOR 
DESIGNATED 


GOV'T GRANTS 
& CONTRACTS 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FY 2003 
ESTIMATE 


313 


33,397 


7 


4,726 


9 


1,805 





19 


Pi' 2004 
ESTIMATE 


360 


38,610 


4 


4,301 


11 


1 1 ,840 








FY 2005 
ESTIMATE 


383 


34,828 


4 


383 


11 


1,837 









STRATEGIC GOALS: INCREASED PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT; ENHANCED 
MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE; GREATER FINANCIAL STRENGTH 

Federal Resource Summary by Performance Objective 



Performance 
Objective 


FY 2004 


FY 2005 


Change 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


Increased Public Engagement: 














Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and other public 
programs 


48 


5,530 


54 


5,846 


6 


316 


Expand a national outreach effort 


49 


6,320 


54 


5,809 


5 


-511 


Strengthen the high caliber of Smithsonian scholarship in 
support of public programs 


8 


747 


8 


1,042 





295 


Develop and bring first-class educational resources to the 
nation 


53 


4,112 


74 


5,683 


21 


1,571 


Improve the stewardship of the national collections 


112 


8,000 


87 


6,559 


-25 


-1,441 


Deliver the highest quality visitor services 


6 


623 


12 


834 


6 


211 


Enhanced Management Excellence: 














Strengthen an Institutional culture that is customer- 
centered and results-oriented 


29 


2,833 


34 


3,163 


5 


330 


Modernize the Institution's information technology 
systems and infrastructure 


17 


3,877 


22 


3,218 


5 


-659 


Ensure that the Smithsonian workforce is efficient, 
collaborative, committed, and innovative 


5 


316 


5 


316 








Execute an aggressive, long-range Smithsonian facilities 
program 


18 


4,992 


18 


1,235 





-3,757 


Greater Financial Strength: 














Secure the financial resources needed to carry out the 
Institution's mission 


15 


1,260 


15 


1,123 





-137 


Total 


360 


38,610 


383 


34,828 


23 


-3,782 



113 



BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT 

The mission of The National iVluseum of the American Indian (NMAI) is 
to protect, support, and enhance the development, maintenance, and 
perpetuation of Native American cultures and communities through 
innovative public programming, research, and collections. 

To achieve the goal of Increased Public Engagement, NMAI will focus 
its resources to support six community-curated gallery rotations each year in 
the three core exhibits and to present contemporary works of art to the 
public in a fourth gallery in the new Mall Museum. These exhibits, along with 
significant educational and public programming, will attract an anticipated 4- 
6 million visitors annually. The offering of crafts demonstrations, educational 
presentations, seminars, and symposia will not only ensure a meaningful 
visitor experience but will aid in the control of crowd flow. Web-based 
content based on these programs will reach distant virtual visitors to the 
Museum who may not actually be able to be on site on the East Coast, but 
can avail themselves of technology and written materials. Through its 
community-curated exhibitions and public programming, the Museum 
continues to present the contemporary voice of Native peoples to educate 
and inform the public while countering widespread stereotypes. 

For FY 2005, the estimate includes a program increase of 23 FTEs and 
$2,396,000; a redirection of collection move resources of 27 FTEs and 
$2,536,000 to Mall Museum operations; an increase of $665,000 for 
necessary pay for existing staff funded under this line item; and a decrease 
of $6,843,000 for one-time costs associated with the opening of the Mall 
Museum. Included in the Facilities Operations and Facilities Maintenance line 
items is an increase of 45 FTEs and $2,479,000 for central support of the 
Mall Museum in the areas of facilities maintenance (5 FTEs and $412,000); 
custodial, horticultural, and safety requirements (8 FTEs and 547,000); and 
security (32 FTEs and $1,520,000). 

MEANS AND STRATEGY 

To achieve the goal of Increased Public Engagement, NMAI is directing 
its resources to 1 ) activities that will result in increased visitation to the Mall 
Museum, the Cultural Resource Center in Suitland, MD, and the George 
Gustave Heye Center (GGHC) in New York, which will celebrate its tenth 
anniversary in 2004; 2) public programming that will encompass the 
indigenous peoples of the hemisphere (as mandated in the NMAI legislation) 
and will demonstrate the presence of contemporary Native peoples today; 
and 3) outreach to Native communities, tribes and organizations, through 
technology, internships, seminars, and symposia. 



114 



Outreach efforts will continue to bring the Museum and its resources 
to audiences through media such as the radio and the Web, and innovative 
outreach and training programs. These contacts will link external 
communities to audiences at the Mall Museum through technology and 
involvement in planning and programming. A Film and Video Center will 
present the variety and excellence of Native productions. 

In education, funding will allow for planning and development of 
programs seven days a week, including interpretive activities, cultural arts 
performances, demonstrations, and resource materials about Native 
American history and cultural heritage. Print, audio, and electronic materials 
will be produced to reach an audience of more than four million visitors, and 
inform those who are unable to visit. The Resource Center will provide daily 
information about Native peoples of the western hemisphere, including 
Hawaii, providing opportunities to correct stereotyping. A variety of tribal 
educational resources, including curricula, will be made available to local 
teachers. Native boat building will be demonstrated and exhibited in the 
Potomac area, along with a variety of other activities. 

In addition, staff will make research, film, video, audio, and 
photographic content developed for Mall exhibitions broadly available both in 
the Mall Museum and to Native American communities and public audiences, 
including through the Web, printed materials and collaborative activities with 
other groups and organizations. An example is the agreement with Scholastic 
Magazine, which will reach teachers in the classrooms throughout the U.S. 

All projections for NMAI's attendance have forecast extremely high 
visitation relative to the size of the building. Beyond the 50,000 square feet 
of public galleries, NMAI will program a theatre, the 10,196 square foot 
Potomac Center, a 5,726 square foot Resource Center, outdoor performance 
areas (in season), and numerous educational classrooms and presentation 
areas. NMAI staff will be used to oversee visitor pass systems, group and 
school tour programs, and management of volunteers, and to direct 
presentations in galleries and all public space and program areas to assure 
maximum use of all the educational resources of the building. 

The goal of Enhanced Management Excellence will be addressed by 
most efficiently and economically designating resources to further meet the 
mission of the Museum, implementing the goals of the Smithsonian 
Institution, and enhancing the collection through acquisition of contemporary 
works. FY 2005 represents a significant period in the development and 
presentation of exhibits, public programming, and collection support. It will 
be a period of infrastructure development in support of full capacity NMAI 



115 



operations at its tliree locations, and outreach activities to expand to 
audiences beyond these locations. Support for management activities such 
as human resources, budget, and procurement, as well as technology 
systems for the wide range of work underway to support the Museum's 
programs, will be implemented at all locations. 

The goal of Greater Financial Strength will be addressed by enhancing 
the private base of support for the Museum and its operations. For the first 
time, NMAI will be in a position to cultivate donors and raise money for 
endowments and special programs as a priority. Up until 2004, the Museum 
was required to devote primary time and attention to the raising of private 
funding for major construction projects. Now this focus will change since 
these significant goals have been met. NMAI will intensify efforts to cultivate 
donors from the private sector including foundations, companies, individuals, 
and Native American tribes (which have been very generous in the past). It is 
anticipated that these efforts will address acquisition needs, endowment 
development, special programming, and training efforts. 

STRATEGIC GOALS AND FY 2005 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE GOALS 

Increased Public Engagement 

Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and other public programs 
(54 FTEs and $5,848,000) 

• Support six community-curated gallery rotations in the three core 
exhibits in the Mall Museum, and implement a dynamic inter- 
departmental exhibit development plan to hold and attract new 
visitors to the Smithsonian 

• Use the Museum's collections to produce a variety of print 
products (posters and calendars) for sale and distribution to the 
Museum visitor and the general public to enhance the appeal of the 
exhibitions 

• Complete production and printing of the publication to accompany 
the Northwest Coast exhibit at GGHC 

• Organize the Native American Film and Video Festival, showcasing 
approximately 70 works introduced by filmmakers and community 
members, in order to gain higher visibility for NMAI with teachers, 
students, and scholars, and identify NMAI as a direct link to Native 
film and video makers 

Expand a national outreach effort (54 FTEs and $5,809,000) 

• Organize a Native Networks workshop to network NMAI film and 
video activities with Native media organizations and producers to 
serve 20 Native and media organizations from North, Central, and 
South America, and approximately 10 non-profit US media 
organizations 



116 



• Expand the use of the bilingual Native Networks Website to bring 
NMAI film and video information to the nation and the world (in 
English and Spanish) 

• Develop a traveling Native Film Festival to be viewed in Native and 
non-Native communities 

• Expand Fourth Museum outreach to two new Native communities 
in Latin America, specifically through participation in the Native 
Arts Program via visiting arts scholars 

• Expand electronic initiatives through innovative educational Internet 
programming to reach 2-3 underserved and isolated Native 
communities throughout the Americas 

• Continue to develop and administer a community services program 
plan and involve 10-15 new communities in program activities 

• Present educational information in schools across the country for 
grades 4-8 via collaboration with Scholastic Magazine 

Strengthen the high caliber of Smithsonian scholarship in support of 
public programs (8 FTEs and $1,042,000) 

• Develop three non-commercial publications in FY 2005 to support 
the activities of Museum departments (Public Programs, Cultural 
Resources, Community Services) and promote outreach to the 
general public by augmenting awareness of Native American life 

• Develop strategies to increase access to NMAI publications by 
offering alternatives to the traditional printed material, including 
access through the Web and print-on-demand 

• Ensure quality and importance of research in support of the 2005 
Film Festival through internal and external peer review 

Develop and bring first-class educational resources to the nation 
(74. FTEs and $5,683,000) 

• Provide diversified and ongoing publications and living arts 
programs, including 182 annual theatrical performances; 36 
cultural activities per year; 364 interpretive gallery programs per 
year; and 2 major symposia annually 

• Increase participation of underrepresented indigenous communities 
in NMAI programming and activities by entering into collaborative 
efforts with Indian Colleges and Universities, professional 
publications, and through developing curriculum materials for 
classroom use 

• Continue to provide daily information services about NMAI and 
Native peoples to the public and tribal communities using 
technology-based capacity at the Resource Centers 

• Extend Mall and Heye Center educational products and public 
programming to national audiences through Smithsonian affiliates 
and other venues such as community-based activities 



117 



• Extend Resource Centers and Educational Programs to national 
audiences through video-conferencing and webcasting 

Improve the stewardship of the national collections (87 FTEs and 
$6,559,000) 

• Maintain excellent cold and cool storage facilities in Washington 
and New York for NMAI media collections and documentation of 
programs 

• Replace/update Registration Collection Information System 
database 

• Digitize 5,000 historical archival images 

• Provide acid-free housing and new storage cabinets for 3,500 
works of art on paper; and increase accessibility by digitizing 
collection for more easy viewing 

• Enforce comprehensive pest management controls to identify 
captured pests in the collections and take steps to decrease 
recurrences of infestation 

Deliver the highest quality visitor services (12 FTEs and $834,000) 

• Implement new systems for visitor passes, guidance, information, 
and services at the Mall Museum for anticipated visitation of 4-6 
million 

• Develop and maintain a visitor group tracking system to help 
identify school, family, and community groups 

• Produce and provide print pieces to enhance the visitor's 
experience with general information about the Museum, its 
exhibitions, programs, and other services. Make these resources 
available in alternate formats, including Braille and Web access 

Enhanced Management Excellence 

Strengthen an Institutional culture that is customer-centered and 
results-oriented (34 FTEs and $3, 163,000) 

• Respond to all internal, 0MB, Congressional, and other budgetary 
requirements accurately and on time 

• Meet all NMAI and Smithsonian needs for procurement/travel 
management and reporting, including support for a Mall Museum at 
full operational levels 

Modernize the Institution's information technology systems and 
functions (22 FTEs and $3,218,000) 

• Provide secure, reliable, and efficient technological systems 
meeting federal standards, with less than 1 % downtime 

• Replace the Storage Area Network at the Cultural Resources Center 
and expand staff access to digital media by 50% 

• Finalize the migration of data contained in an internally-developed 
system for tracking registration information to a new commercially- 



118 



developed collection information system, test the new system, and 
release the system for use to 30% more staff 

• Train staff and increase by 30% use of various information 
systems 

• Acquire a webcasting server to support distance learning and 
outreach activities 

• Increase electronic newsletter subscriptions to 250,000 
subscribers from a previous base of 25,000 members 

• Provide an online Web-based electronic ordering capability for 
NMAI media resources through participation in OCIO's Digital 
Repository effort 

Ensure that the Smithsonian's worliforce is efficient, collaborative, 
committed, and innovative (5 FTEs and $316,000) 

• Continue to manage an active, supportive, and responsive human 
resources operation within NMAI to achieve the following: provide 
an Individual Development Plan for all employees; institute a 
training budget at a level that is 1 % of NMAI's salary allocation; 
provide performance plans to all applicable staff; ensure all 
supervisors conduct at least one mid-year review; increase the 
percentage of Native American hires to 30%; and fill 90% of 
vacancies 

Execute an aggressive, long-range Smithsonian facilities program 
(18 FTEs and $1,235,000) 

• Provide maintenance, security, and visitor support services for a 
seven-day-a-week operation open to the public at the Heye Center 
in New York 

Greater Financial Strength 

Secure the financial resources needed to carry out the Institution's 
mission (15 FTEs and $1, 123,000) 

• Raise between $8-12 million for education, endowment, events, 
and programs for the Mall Museum and GGHC from all NMAI 
constituencies including tribes, individuals, corporations, and 
foundations 

• Grow the individual membership base from 55,000 to 65,000 
members, and increase the dollar amount from $2,800,000 to 
$4,100,000 by the end of calendar year 2005 

• Grow the NMAI Corporate Membership Program by 18-25 
members from a current base of 1 5 members, and increase the 
membership level from $120,000 to $200,000 

• Raise $500,000 to match a Ford Foundation Challenge Grant 

• Develop a strategic plan to determine future funding needs and 
resources for NMAI 



119 



FY 2005 REQUEST - EXPLANATION OF CHANGE 

The FY 2005 budget estimate includes a net increase of 23 FTEs and 
$2,396,000 and a redirection of move resources of 27 FTEs and 
$2,536,000 to support the first full operational year at the Mall Museum. As 
in previous years, these resources are requested to remain available until 
expended. Included are an increase of $665,000 for necessary pay and a 
decrease of $6,843,000 for one-time costs, both of which are justified in the 
Non-discretionary Costs section of this budget. The requested increase and 
redirection of resources together total 50 FTEs and $4,932,000. These 
resources will be directed to the following: 

• (-1- $976,000, -I- 6 FTEs) This increase includes $376,000 to support 
four exhibit specialists, one media assistant and one exhibit designer, and 
$600,000 to support day-to-day operations and to rotate the community- 
curated sections in the three core galleries of the Mall Museum. The 
exhibits must be rotated to allow a greater diversity and representation of 
Native peoples. 

• (-1- $1,982,000, + 26 FTEs) These resources will support the planning, 
development, and implementation of interconnected educational and 
cultural programs, activities, and resources that NMAI will share with on- 
site visitors and constituents across the country and around the world. 

A Film and Video Center will offer online information services and 
databases about Native film and video media to scholars, teachers. Native 
community members, and the general public. The Center also will provide 
special workshops and information services to Native media makers and 
Native organizations throughout the Western Hemisphere and Hawaii. The 
Center will program media viewing/listening stations for the Resource 
Center, supervise the audiovisual technical support for the Public 
Programs Department's events and documentation projects, support 
Native American film and video scholarly research, and expand 
community outreach through off-site programs, including new Internet 
development and live radio broadcasting from the Mall Museum and the 
GGHC. Three FTEs, an assistant manager, program assistant and a Native 
film specialist, and $249,000 are requested for the Center. 

Cultural Arts programs will provide visitors with the opportunity to 
experience the living arts, lives, and concerns of the indigenous peoples 
of the Western Hemisphere through performances, demonstrations, 
workshops, and spoken word programs. Programs for communities 
outside of the DC area will be planned, as well as conferences and 
symposia that will include electronic links for distance-learning 
opportunities with Native American colleges and other community 
organizations and tribes. Special festivals for families will be organized 



120 



and implemented around Native American values related to ecology, 
people, history, and tradition. Required resources include $263,000 and 4 
FTEs, two specialists to develop family and tribal programs, and two 
coordinators to manage programs and participants. This staff will work 
closely with Publications, Education, Community Services, and other 
NMAI units to provide a complete and coordinated series of public 
programs, special events, festivals, and collaborative programs. Staff will 
perform fieldwork and planning for the Folklife Festival and additional 
large-scale events that will serve visitors during the times of heaviest 
visitation — spring and summer. 

Educational programs will offer first-hand learning opportunities to diverse 
public audiences through participatory activities and demonstrations, 
gallery programs, classes and workshops, and interpretive materials. 
Twelve FTEs and $782,000 are required to support educational programs 
at the Mall Museum. Native American Cultural Interpreters will lead 
interpretive gallery programs on a daily basis in the Mall Museum for 
school groups and museum visitors. To carry out these services seven 
days a week, an interpretive gallery program coordinator, a lead 
interpreter, four interpreters, and an administrative assistant are required. 
A reservations secretary will be needed to handle school and non-school 
group reservations for Mall programs and exhibits. 

Theatrical programs produced by NMAI will be presented in the 1^* floor 
theater of the Mall Museum. Two productions will be commissioned each 
year. These educational programs will run daily in the spring and fall. An 
interpretive theater administrative assistant will be needed to support this 
operation. 

The Potomac Center will be a hub of educational and demonstration 
activity at NMAI. The Potomac Center will open with a Native boat 
building exhibit and demonstration program. Music, dance, storytelling, 
lectures, craft demonstrations and other cultural activities relating to 
boats, boat building and navigation will be presented in spaces 
throughout the Museum three days per month. An administrative 
assistant will be needed to carry out the administrative functions of the 
Potomac Center. 

Native American guest instructors will teach hands-on classes and 
workshops for individuals and families. A lectures coordinator and an oral 
history specialist will be needed to plan and oversee symposia, classes, 
and workshops held in Washington DC and in other parts of the country 
for scholars, colleges and universities, teachers, students, and the general 
public. 



121 



Funding in the amount of 2 FTEs and $152,000 is also requested for 
Fourth Museum outreach to native communities in Latin America for 
expansion of electronic programming to underserved and isolated Native 
communities throughout the Americas. In addition, funds will provide 
participation in programs and activities connected with community 
development components of Mall exhibitions to allow direct interaction 
between visitors and cultural representatives, enhancing the visitor 
experience. 

Funding of $348,000 and 5 FTEs is required for the Resource Center to 
purchase site licenses for commercial Native American databases and to 
provide database training. These databases will be made available to 
Native Americans through the thirty-three tribal colleges, tribal libraries 
and tribal governments and organizations. In addition, the Resource 
Center will provide a daily online reference service to 8,000 visitors per 
day about Native Peoples of the Western Hemisphere including Hawaii, 
and NMAI daily activities. Two cultural information specialists and three 
cultural specialists will be needed to carry out the ongoing functions of 
the Resource Center. 

Support in the amount of $1 88,000 will be essential to support and 
maintain the demands for Museum printed matter and press materials 
which will include; brochures, press packets, printed press releases, 
public service announcements, clippings, film, press tags, posters, media 
database, media website, collateral (graphic) identity across all media, 
media monitoring, and a daily calendar of events. 
(+ $582,000, + 6 FTEs) The requested funds include $252,000 for 
staff and $330,000 for programmatic increases for Visitors Services. 
NMAI will experience peak-capacity and over-capacity crowds during 
most of the year. The Museum is expecting approximately 1 2,000 people 
per day. In order to manage crowd flow and get as many visitors as 
possible into the building, NMAI plans to control crowds with advance 
passes, same-day passes, and crowd-management assistants inside and 
at the entry plaza of the building. The requested staff will take tickets at 
the entrances to the Museum and guide visitors to all areas of the 
building. This service will also ensure that visitors will have staff available 
to answer questions about the Museum and its activities. Five floor-staff 
ticket positions and one floor-staff groups position will be needed to carry 
out these functions to sustain a seven-day-a-week operation. 
{+ $180,000, + 2 FTEs) The requested funding is for two assistant 
archivists (one media and one photo) who will be responsible for the 
migration and integration of existing databases into the media access 
management database. They will conduct extensive ongoing historical 



122 



research into provenance, intellectual copyright issues, and cultural 
property rights issues. Judicious evaluation of accessioned archival media 
is critical to the reliability of the archived collection. 

• (+ $320,000, + 5 FTEs) These resources will support the full range of 
management activities involved with the Mall Museum at full operational 
levels. Two procurement/travel specialists will keep pace with a growing 
demand for travel and purchases associated with the Museum opening 
and ongoing activities and maintenance of records for audit purposes. A 
budget analyst will ensure that the financial requirements of the Museum 
and its staff are maintained and that budget requests are prepared on a 
timely and accurate basis. A personnel technical support person will 
ensure that the increased staff at NMAI are supported from a human 
resources perspective. A mail clerk will ensure that all mailroom functions 
are handled efficiently. 

• (+ $892,000, + 5 FTEs) The requested technology resources will enable 
NMAI to replace its Storage Area Network (SAN) with new equipment. 
NMAI's SAN provides much needed storage space for digital media 
collections including digital photo archives, some 600,000 images of 
collections objects, scans of NMAI's original catalogue cards, digital audio 
interviews for radio programming, and digital film and video resources 
generated by NMAI events. The SAN provides NMAI with the ability to 
reuse media resources for multiple purposes and will save time, effort, 
and financial resources. Of the requested amount, one-time funds of 
$412,000 are required for the purchase of SAN equipment. 

Also requested is $60,000 in one-time funds for a webcasting server to 
support distance learning and electronic outreach initiatives to 
classrooms, community centers, and public audiences. Funding is also 
required for five FTEs ($420,000) to provide technology guidance and 
professional support for all computer applications used by NMAI staff. 
The Inspector General recommended that NMAI strengthen technology 
management through its Information and Technology Resources unit. 

If the FY 2005 request is not allowed, NMAI will not have sufficient 
staff and financial support to continue the opening programmatic offerings, 
exhibits, and management infrastructure outlined in its mission statement 
and to meet the expectations of both NMAI's constituency and its visitors 
for the new Museum. Federal support requested for FY 2005 is the level that 
has been determined necessary to maintain and operate the Mall Museum 
after its opening in September 2004, as envisioned in the original legislation 
and the mission of the Museum. 

The area of public programs is not only an inherent part of NMAI's 
education, outreach, and exhibits supplementation, but is also an integral 



123 



part of its plans to manage the vast nunnbers of visitors who will need to be 
accommodated within the space constraints of the building itself. NMAI 
anticipates that an additional 1 .5 million visitors annually can be afforded a 
worthwhile museum experience through the prudent utilization of public 
programming to supplement the exhibit offerings. Exhibits support is 
essential to maintaining the three major galleries and the changing gallery 
(devoted to contemporary art) and to implementing a rotation of community- 
curated exhibits as a key part of the commitment to include as many of the 
indigenous cultures of this hemisphere as possible in exhibit offerings and 
education programs. This effort will increase the Museum's impact through 
the sharing of its resources in the most expansive manner possible through 
the use of exhibits, education programs on site, and through collaborative 
efforts reaching teachers, the wide use of technology to provide "visitation" 
to the exhibits without being on site, and outreach to Native communities 
through training opportunities. Without these increases, these much needed 
and anticipated services would not be available either to meet public demand 
or to meet the responsibility for safeguarding the priceless artifacts entrusted 
to the Museum. 



124 



NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY 





APPLICATION OF OPERATING RESOURCES 


FEDERAL 
APPROPRIATIONS 


GENERAL 
TRUST 


DONOR/SPONSOR 
DESIGNATED 


GOV'T GRANTS 
& CONTRACTS 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FY 2003 
ESTIMATE 


79 


5,595 


3 


918 


7 


3,121 








FY 2004 
ESTIMATE 


64 


4,986 


3 


906 


17 


11,714 








FY 2005 
ESTIMATE 


73 


8,244 


3 


944 


6 


10,795 









STRATEGIC GOALS: INCREASED PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT; ENHANCED 

MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE 

Federal Resource Summary by Performance Objective 



Performance 
Objective 


FY 
FTE 


2004 
$000 


FY 
FTE 


2005 
$000 


FTE 


lange 
$000 
















Increased Public Engagement: 














Offer compelling, first-class exiiibitions and other 
programs 


21 


1,690 


26 


3,657 


5 


1,967 


Expand a national outreach effort 


4 


355 


5 


545 


1 


190 


Strengthen the high caliber of Smithsonian 
scholarship in support of public programs 


7 


579 


7 


752 





173 


Develop and bring first-class educational resources 
to the nation 


7 


446 


7 


663 





217 


Improve the stewardship of the national collections 


11 


660 


12 


1,069 


1 


409 


Enhanced Management Excellence: 














Strengthen an Institutional culture that is customer- 
centered and results-oriented 


13 


1,013 


14 


1,217 


1 


204 


Modernize the Institution's information technology 
systems and infrastructure 


1 


243 


2 


341 


1 


98 


Total 


64 


4,986 


73 


8.244 


9 


3,258 



BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT 

The National Portrait Gallery (NPG) functions as a free public museum 
for the exhibition and study of portraiture depicting men and women who 
have made significant contributions to the history, development, and culture 



125 



of the people of the United States and the artists who created such 
portraiture. 

Congress established NPG to be the pinnacle of national recognition 
and the Gallery will continue to ensure that its collections are available to the 
American public while the Patent Office Building (POB) is closed for 
renovation. Definitive plans will be made for components of the visitor 
experience that will include new interpretative exhibitions, performances, 
publications, and electronic strategies when the Portrait Gallery reopens in 
the building on July 4, 2006. In addition, the museum's collections, 
programs, and research base will be expanded to be inclusive of 
underrepresented Americans. 

For FY 2005, the estimate includes an increase of 9 FTEs and 
$3,258,000. This amount includes an increase of 9 FTEs and $1,085,000 
for salaries and benefits, a one-time increase of $2,000,000, and $173,000 
for necessary pay for existing staff funded under this line item. 

MEANS AND STRATEGY 

A major FY 2005 effort will be to finalize collection installation plans 
for the reopening of the museum in the Patent Office Building in 2006. An 
additional 1 5 percent of the museum's collections will be on view as a result 
of the renovation. NPG will use new ideas and methods to connect 
innovative programs with marketing and strategic vision. Significant 
decisions on layout, exhibitions, furnishings, electronic elements, and printed 
materials will be made, and construction and fabrication of exhibition display 
components will begin. NPG will conduct audience and customer surveys to 
develop new interpretive strategies for programs to enhance the visitor's 
experience. 

Three traveling exhibitions will complete their national tours in 
FY 2005: American Women, A Selection from tfie National Portrait Gallery, 
composed of images of 60 prominent women from the permanent collection; 
Portraits of the Presidents from the National Portrait Gallery, composed of 
portraits of all United States Presidents; and Women of Our Time: Twentieth- 
Century Photographs, focusing on women of achievement during the last 
century. As part of an international, multi-museum curatorial effort, NPG will 
participate in the creation and tour of a fourth traveling exhibition. The One 
and Many Faces of Latin America: 2000 Years of Portraiture. 

NPG will conclude the nationwide tour of the iconic Lansdowne 
portrait of George Washington with a major retrospective of the work of the 
portrait's artist, Gilbert Stuart. The Stuart exhibition is co-organized with the 



126 



Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and will open there in October 
2004, and be shown in Washington DC at the National Gallery of Art the 
following spring. Stuart is the most successful and resourceful portraitist of 
America's early national period. 

The fourth annual Peck Presidential Awards for Service to a President 
and Portrayal of a President will be announced in late autumn 2004. The 
winners will participate in a session designed as an educational forum to 
further the understanding of the presidency for high school students. A 
nationwide portrait competition allowing artists — both known and 
unknown— to submit their works will be held in FY 2005. A portrait 
commission and a cash award will be bestowed on the winner in FY 2006 
when an exhibition of selected portraits will be shown to coincide with the 
return of the Portrait Gallery to the Patent Office Building. 

Staff will research, write, and develop publications to accompany 
exhibitions and programs, including those planned for the POB reopening. 
NPG will continue to lend collection objects to museums throughout the 
country and the world, and will continue to serve as an active participant in 
the Smithsonian's Affiliations Program. Press mailings and events will be 
planned to accompany openings of exhibitions and public programs. NPG will 
continue to develop a broad range of regional and national educational 
programs for school and community audiences. These programs will be 
designed for varied ages using such media as literature-based arts activities, 
musical performances, plays, historical actors, touch-screen interactives, and 
workshops for teachers and museum professionals. 

Plans for a permanent home for 80 percent of the collections currently 
in temporary storage that will not return to the Patent Office Building will be 
established in FY 2005. Over 2,000 research records will be added to the 
Gallery's Collections Information System and work will continue to enhance 
collections data and images. The Gallery will continue its significant 
contribution to the visual history of our nation through the distribution of 
photographic and digital images from its collection for use in books, videos, 
CDs, and other media. The Gallery's award-winning website will continue to 
present innovative programs to increase the number of visitors and enhance 
their experience. New Web exhibitions and educational outreach programs 
that feature historical events and ethnic diversity will be added. 

NPG will ensure that its computing infrastructure meets Institution- 
wide standards and staff is trained to use Smithsonian systems effectively. 



127 



STRATEGIC GOALS AND FY 2005 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE GOALS 

Increased Public Engagement 

Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and other public programs 
(26 FTEs and $3, 657, 000) 

• Present a major loan exhibition on Latin American portraiture at the 
international Gallery to encourage a more diverse audience (50,000 
visitors anticipated) 

• Present a major retrospective of Gilbert Stuart's work in 
cooperation with two other museums to display the artist's works 
and educate the public about one of America's most successful 
portrait artists (100,000 visitors anticipated) 

• Design five education programs for 200 presentations to schools 
and community organizations 

• Finalize 100% of installation design of galleries in the POB with 
particular emphasis on new strategies for exhibiting the permanent 
collection to increase audience attendance 

• Develop, refine, and shape content for audio tour highlights of the 
permanent collection to ensure readiness for the POB reopening 

• Construct and fabricate essential display components for 
reinstallation of 700 objects and 5 special exhibitions in the POB, 
including over 100 pedestals and cases, brackets and armatures, 
and nearly 1 ,000 labels and text panels 

• Collaborate on the pan-Smithsonian exhibition At First Sight: 
Photography and the Smithsonian, slated to open in Washington 
and travel to multiple venues in FY 2005, to highlight NPG's 
photography collection to the public 

Expand a national outreach effort (5 FTEs and $545,000) 

• Launch NPG's first nationwide portrait competition and plan for a 
related exhibition and accompanying education programs for school 
and community audiences to increase innovation and engagement 
in portraiture and encourage public participation in the arts 

• Award two Peck Presidential Medals and present two Town Hall 
sessions to promote the understanding of the Presidency among 
high school students 

• Publish four issues of Profile, the Gallery's publication, to increase 
national public awareness of NPG programs and research 

• Bring more educational programs, NPG collections, and research 
resources to the public and to a more diverse audience by 
increasing the number and diversity of programs, records, and 
images on the NPG website by 2,1 50 

• Increase the number of NPG website visits by 500,000 and the 
number of queries to the website collections and research database 
by 5,000 



128 



Strengthen the high caliber of Smithsonian scholarship in support of 
public programs (7 FTEs and $752,000) 

• Work with publisher on galleys and proofs for Volume 6 of The 
Selected Papers of Charles Willson Peale and His Family for 
publication and begin research for Volume 7 in order to share 
research with the public 

• Research, write, and edit material for 1 ,000 collection objects to 
be exhibited in reopened museum to ensure readiness for the POB 
reopening 

• Publish a major publication on Gilbert Stuart in connection with the 
Stuart exhibition in order to have a permanent record of the 
exhibition and the preparatory research for the public 

• Plan for publication of two books, two brochures, and other items 
for the 2006 reopening of the POB 

Develop and bring first-class educational resources to the nation 
(7 FTEs and $663,000) 

• Improve the quality of impact on website audiences by developing 
two online education components to accompany special exhibitions 

• To modernize display components, develop new ways to present 
public programs by incorporating interactive elements into two 
exhibitions planned in the POB 

Improve the stewardship of the national collections (12 FTEs and 
$1,069,000) 

• To ensure adherence to current museum practices, complete an 
inventory to track the collection and update 600 object records 

• Acquire portraits of significant Americans when available— 
particularly from underrepresented populations— to diversify the 
collection 

• Begin to move approximately 700 objects in the permanent 
collection back into the POB to prepare for the reopening 

• Complete conservation of 200 objects to be 
restored/matted/framed for public view in the POB 

• In order to maintain a state-of-the-art and up-to-date Collections 
Information System, implement one upgrade and add 2,200 
records and images that include NPG and Catalog of American 
Portraits objects 

Enhanced Management Excellence 

Strengthen an Institutional culture that is customer-centered and 
results-oriented (14 FTEs and $1,217,000) 

• Collect and report on audience/customer data for all NPG programs 
and products, and introduce marketing planning, implementation, 
and controls to use as a base for planning the reopening of the POB 



129 



• Improve the management of NPG through increased staff 
communications, training, and reorganizations as appropriate 

Modernize the Institution's information tectinoiogy systems and 
infrastructure (2 FTEs and $341,000) 

• Replace NPG computers in a timely manner in accordance with the 
Smithsonian's goal of modernized management systems 

FY 2005 REQUEST-EXPLANATION OF CHANGE 

The FY 2005 budget estimate includes a net increase of $3,258,000 
and 9 FTEs. Included is an increase of $173,000 for necessary pay for 
existing staff. The Institution is seeking a permanent program increase of 9 
FTEs and $1,085,000 for salaries and benefits and a one-time increase of 
$2,000,000 requested as no-year funds to implement, maintain, and update 
programs/activities necessary for the reopening of the Patent Office Building. 
The increases are as follows: 

• (-H $1,085,000, -I- 9 FTEs) This permanent increase Is for salaries, 
benefits, and other costs associated with reopening the Patent Office 
Building and providing continual support for an enhanced level of 
programming. The positions of web development assistant, design and 
production office manager, assistant designer, graphics designer 
assistant, lighting designer, cabinet maker, art handler, administrative 
assistant, and computer technician are all vital to an enhanced level of 
exposure and activity in the Museum, which is at the core of the 
renovation effort. Increased funds and contractual staff are also needed 
to resolve the complications of moving and conserving collections objects 
now at off-site facilities but being prepared for display in the renovated 
POB. 

• ( + $2,000,000) This temporary increase is for no-year funds to provide 
the most effective and efficient means of phasing NPG requirements to 
coincide with the POB renovation progress. These funds will cover one- 
time expenses for temporary staff, contractual services, materials, and 
equipment to design and install galleries, produce audiovisual components 
for programs, provide electronic orientation interactives for the public, 
produce electronic and printed materials to advertise programs to the 
widest possible audience, purchase furnishings for the galleries, and train 
staff in new programs. 

If the FY 2005 request is not allowed, NPG will not be able to develop 
new exhibition and gallery spaces effectively or prepare for the reopening of 
the Patent Office Building in a timely manner. This will fail to support a 
program worthy of the newly renovated Patent Office Building. 



130 



SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN ART MUSEUM 





APPLICATION OF OPERATING RESOURCES 


FEDERAL 
APPROPRIATIONS 


GENERAL 
TRUST 


DONOR/SPONSOR 
DESIGNATED 


GOV'T GRANTS 
& CONTRACTS 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FY 2003 
ESTIMATE 


115 


8,265 


4 


1,162 


7 


5,831 








FY 2004 
ESTIMATE 


97 


7,739 


4 


1,092 


10 


5,120 








FY 2005 
ESTIMATE 


109 


12,388 


4 


766 


10 


6,120 









STRATEGIC GOALS: INCREASED PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT; ENHANCED 

MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE 

Federal Resource Summary by Performance Objective 



Pet^ormance 
Objective 


FY 
FTE 


2004 
$000 


FY 
FTE 


2005 
$000 


Ch 
FTE 


lange 
$000 


Increased Public Engagement: 














Offer compelling first-class exhibitions and other 
public programs 


18 


1,552 


27 


5,217 


9 


3,665 


Expand a national outreach effort 


6 


497 


7 


722 


1 


225 


Develop and bring first-class educational resources 
to the nation 


25 


2,106 


25 


2,174 





68 


Improve the stewardship of the national collections 


29 


2,190 


29 


2,262 





72 


Deliver the highest quality visitor services 








1 


210 


1 


210 


Enhanced Management Excellence: 














Strengthen an institutional culture that is customer- 
centered and results-oriented 


9 


639 


9 


660 





21 


Modernize the Institution's information technology 
systems and infrastructure 


5 


381 


5 


394 





13 


Enhance the reputation of the Smithsonian by 
maintaining good relations with the news media 
and with federal, state, and local governments 


5 


374 


6 


749 


1 


375 


Total 


97 


7,739 


109 


12,388 


12 


4,649 



BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT 

The Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) is the nation's 
museum dedicated to the arts and artists of the United States from colonial 
times to the present. The Museum's programs make American art available 



131 



to national audiences and beyond, as well as to those who visit its two 
historic landmark buildings in Washington DC: the Patent Office Building 
(POB), closed for major renovation and due to reopen July 4, 2006, and the 
Renwick Gallery. 

To meet the goal of Increased Public Engagement, SAAM devotes 
most of its federal resources to exhibitions, education, and the enhancement, 
presentation, and care of its permanent collection, as well as research 
resources, a popular website, publications, and services to the public. The 
remainder is dedicated to effectively managing the Museum's resources in 
the pursuit of Enhanced Management Excellence. 

For FY 2005, the estimate includes a program increase of 12 FTEs and 
$4,578,000 (offset by a redirection of $185,000) for the reinstallation and 
reopening of the POB, and an increase of $256,000 for necessary pay for 
existing staff funded under this line item. 

MEANS AND STRATEGY 

The goal of the renovation of the POB is to Increase Public 
Engagement. With additional and/or revitalized gallery space, SAAM will 
share with the public a greater portion of its collection than ever before. 
Enhanced visitor services, additional public space, and upgraded utility 
systems, as well as a grand year-round courtyard and the Luce Foundation 
Center for American Art, will permit the Museum to engage the public in 
ways that were either impossible or impractical in the past. Thus, SAAM is 
directing the majority of its resources to the reopening of the POB on July 4, 
2006, while also continuing to present exhibitions, rotations of its permanent 
collection, and public programs at the Renwick Gallery. The works of art in 
SAAM's collection tell the story of this country, and plans for how best to 
present that story upon reopening involve the efforts and cooperation of 
every Museum department, as well as staff of the National Portrait Gallery 
(NPG), which shares the POB with SAAM. 

Beginning in 2000, when the POB closed for the renovation, the 
Museum circulated eight exhibitions of some of its finest art works 
throughout the U.S. in order to continue linking Americans to their heritage. 
As these tours end in 2003, the Museum is returning the objects to prepare 
them for the reopening, and the tours are being replaced by Highlights from 
the Smithsonian American Art Museum, a new series of five exhibitions that 
will tour from 2003 to 2005. In 2004, the exhibition George Catlin and His 
Indian Gallery will also tour. To expand its national outreach, the Museum 
continues to publish the American Art journal three times annually, and is 
enhancing its website, which contains extensive information about SAAM's 



132 



collections, programs, and exhibitions. The Museum's popular public online 
reference service— /4s/r Joan o/'/l/t— continues to respond to art-related 
inquiries from American and international audiences. In addition to reaching 
out to the general public, SAAM reaches students in classrooms across the 
country through the use of new technology and distance-learning tools. 

The Museum continues strategically to broaden its collection of 
40,000 objects with significant acquisitions, and to move toward its goal of 
digitizing every object in the collection. In 2003, funds made available from 
within the Institution will support an initiative to enhance the Museum's 
collection of Latino art. 

To achieve the goal of Management Excellence, the Museum will 
continue improving its business practices and internal capabilities in order to 
manage its resources most effectively. As the Institution introduces new 
phases of its Enterprise Resource Planning system, SAAM will ensure that its 
staff has the resources and training needed to implement the system most 
efficiently. As a harbinger of the exciting new technology to be used to 
enhance visitors' experiences in the renovated museum, SAAM is introducing 
a prototype handheld personal computer at the Renwick Gallery, to offer 
visitors a unique way to learn more about the objects displayed and the • 
artists who created them. Significant progress is being made in developing a 
technical infrastructure that will efficiently support this and other innovative 
presentations being planned for the renovated POB. Museum staff will 
continue to work effectively with all involved parties to ensure that the POB 
renovation remains on schedule, that the Museum's needs in the building are 
effectively addressed, and that SAAM's plans for shared spaces are 
compatible with those of the National Portrait Gallery. The Museums are also 
planning a nationwide media campaign to herald the reopening of the POB 
and to increase visitation at the reopened facility. 

STRATEGIC GOALS AND FY 2005 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE GOALS 

Increased Public Engagement 

Offer compelling first-class exhibitions and other public programs 
(27 FTEs and $5,217,000) 

• Conclude exhibition of American Studio Furniture at the Renwick 
Gallery and install High Fiber, an exhibition of textiles popular with 
a wide audience of craft enthusiasts, in order to maintain the 
modest increase in visitation post-9/1 1 

• Complete list of exhibitions, and develop plan for gallery 
installations and programs in the expanded, redefined, and/or new 
POB spaces, such as the 350-seat auditorium, to take maximum 
advantage of the opportunities they will provide; and coordinate 



133 



the work in a way that ensures readiness to occupy renovated 
spaces as soon as they are available 
Expand a national outreach effort (7 FTEs and $722,000) 

• Conclude national tours of the Highlights and George Catlin 
exhibits, which together will visit eight venues in FY 2005, in order 
to prepare a significant number of the 5,000 objects to be installed 
in POB 

• Complete development phases of the Luce Foundation Center to 
ensure readiness to begin installation in POB in the area scheduled 
to be completed first, in June 2005 

• Compile installation layout and handling instructions for 3,000 
objects going in the Center's cases 

• Define 8 special installations for interpretation and contract an 
outside consultant to design them 

• Contract firm to design the interface and design templates for 
interpretive computer kiosks 

• Start installation of 63 museum cases 

• Complete content for 1 00 featured objects that includes video 
clips and audio elements 

Develop and bring first-class educational resources to the nation 
(25 FTEs and $2, 174,000) 

• Publish three issues of the scholarly, peer-reviewed journal 
American Art 

• Revise website to provide downloadable teacher guides and other 
resources to enhance training, and enable tracking of use by Zip 
Code 

• Expand videoconference virtual fieldtrips, and enable tracking of 
participants by Zip Code 

Improve the stewardship of the national collections (29 FTEs and 
$2,262,000) 

• Contract a firm to design the interface and design templates for the 
interpretive computer kiosks in the Visible Conservation Center in 
order to share conservation care of the collections with the public 

• Complete content for the 5 focus areas of conservation for kiosks 
in the Visible Conservation Center in order to ensure readiness to 
begin installation in the same area of POB as the Luce Center, in 
June 2005 

Deliver the highest quality visitor services (1 FTE and $210,000) 

• Determine number of docents needed to serve the public in the 
renovated POB, and begin recruitment and training for new ones to 
ensure they are ready for the museum opening 



134 



Enhanced Management Excellence 

Strengthen an institutional culture that is customer-centered and 
results-oriented (9 FTEs and $660,000) 

• Initiate recruits for the 1 2 new positions immediately upon receipt 
of allocation in order to hire and train those selected to support 
exhibitions, programs, and services in the reopened POB in a 
manner that will foster among visitors an enthusiasm for the 
museum and a desire to return 

• Evaluate training needs of existing SAAM staff in order to allow 
ample time to prepare them for new or enhanced roles in POB 

Modernize the Institution's information technology systems and 
functions (5 FTEs and $394,000) 

• Make significant progress in developing the infrastructure needed 
to support the use of technology in innovative presentations 
planned for POB in order to engage a segment of the public who 
prefer more than the traditional gallery experience 

Enhance the reputation of the Smithsonian by maintaining good 
relations with the news media and with federal, state, and local 
governments (6 FTEs and $749,000) 

• Finalize POB branding campaign, with NPG and the services of a 
marketing firm, in order to target the ultimate goal of 2 million 
visitors 

• Ensure new print collaterals, signage and banners, and national 
components for promotional campaign are in place for full 
implementation in FY 2006 

FY 2005 REQUEST -EXPLANATION OF CHANGE 

The FY 2005 budget estimate includes a net increase of $4,649,000 
and 12 FTEs. Included is an increase of $256,000 for necessary pay for 
existing staff, which is justified in the Non-discretionary Costs section of this 
budget, and a redirection of $185,000 from no-year collection acquisition 
funds to one-year funds. The Institution is seeking a program increase of 12 
FTEs and $4,578,000 to reinstall SAAM's collection in the renovated POB 
and to welcome an unprecedented number of visitors with first-class 
exhibitions and programs following the Museum's opening on July 4, 2006. 
The increases are as follows: 

• ( -1- $1 ,578,000, -1-12 FTEs) This increase is for permanent base funding 
to restore the Museum's funding to its pre-closing level, and to enable the 
Museum to establish a program in its renovated facility that is worthy of 
the time, money, and effort that brought the project to fruition. All 
positions are essential to a successful reopening and to the continued 
maintenance of an enhanced program in the POB. Two curators and two 
curatorial assistants will enhance SAAM's ability to develop concepts and 



135 



plans for first-class exhibitions and other initiatives. Five program, 
marketing, and visitor services staff in external affairs (two managers, 
two specialists, and an assistant) will manage and support an increased 
number of programs and attract significantly larger audiences to the 
expanded and new spaces, especially taking advantage of the POB's new 
auditorium. A graphic designer and a registration specialist for exhibitions 
will both be essential to supporting the increased number of high caliber 
exhibitions that will be offered. An education specialist will assist with 
the development of programs and educational materials. 
• ( + $3,000,000) This increase is required as one-time, no-year funding. It 
is needed to prepare the expanded public spaces in POB for visitors in a 
phased process as renovation work is completed. Expenses will include 
purchases of information technology equipment and software; gallery 
furnishings such as benches, pedestals, and cases; and gallery 
preparation materials such as paint, window treatments, and lighting 
fixtures. In addition, contract services to connect and install IT equipment 
in public spaces; to move and install objects; to print a myriad of 
brochures, guides, announcements, and educational materials, and to 
implement a nationwide media campaign surrounding the opening are all 
some of the essential steps to a timely and successful opening. This 
increase must be no-year funding in order to provide the most effective 
and efficient means of phasing accomplishments to coincide with the 
renovation progress. 

If the FY 2005 request is not allowed, SAAM will not be able to 
reopen in the POB in a way that will draw more visitors, reach out to a wide 
national audience, or provide the safest, most efficient, and most accessible 
home for its national collection. The requested amount is the minimum 
required to restore SAAM's base funding to its level prior to the January 
2000 closing, and to make progress toward reopening the Museum as 
scheduled. By the reopening date, SAAM will have maintained a national 
presence for six and a half years by circulating exhibitions, maintaining an 
award-winning website, and presenting some of its collection at the Renwick 
Gallery. The requested funding is now needed to draw the public back to the 
POB and engage them meaningfully. Without the increase, the significance of 
a $216 million renovation of one of Washington's finest buildings, and a 
showcase for America's art and artists, will be lessened. This would also 
impact negatively the goodwill of SAAM's major donors who funded POB 
enhancements with the understanding that their generosity would bring 
American art to many more, and in new and exciting ways. 



136 



ARTHUR M. SACKLER GALLERY/FREER GALLERY OF ART 





APPLICATION OF OPERATING RESOURCES 


FEDERAL 
APPROPRIATIONS 


GENERAL 
TRUST 


DONOR/SPONSOR 
DESIGNATED 


GOV'T GRANTS 
& CONTRACTS 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FY 2003 
ESTIMATE 


71 


6,092 





548 


49 


7,526 








FY 2004 
ESTIMATE 


60 


5,790 





304 


49 


8,435 








FY 2005 
ESTIMATE 


60 


5,987 





224 


49 


8,679 









STRATEGIC GOALS: INCREASED PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT; ENHANCED 

MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE 

Federal Resource Summary by Performance Objective 



Pei^ormance 
Objective 


FY 
FTE 


2004 
$000 


FY 
FTE 


2005 
$000 


Ch 
FTE 


lange 
$000 
















Increased Public Engagement: 














Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and other 
public programs 


16 


1,326 


16 


1,378 





52 


Expand a national outreach effort 


9 


907 


9 


937 





30 


Strengthen the high caliber of Smithsonian 
scholarship in support of public programs 


10 


1,136 


10 


1,169 





33 


Develop and bring first-class educational 
resources to the nation 


6 


466 


6 


486 





20 


Improve the stewardship of the national 
collections 


8 


887 


8 


913 





26 


Deliver the highest quality visitor services 


2 


109 


2 


116 





7 


Enhanced Management Excellence: 














Modernize the Institution's financial management 
systems and functions 


5 


588 


5 


604 





16 


Modernize the Institution's information 
technology systems and infrastructure 


4 


371 


4 


384 





13 


Total 


60 


5.790 


60 


5,987 





197 



137 



BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT 

The Freer Gallery of Art and the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery (FSG) 
celebrate the artistic traditions of Asia. The museums collect, study, exhibit, 
and preserve exemplary works of Asian art as well as works by Whistler and 
other American artists represented in Charles Freer's original gift. The 
combined resources of the museums are directed toward programs that 
advance understanding of the arts of Asia and of the museums' collections. 

To achieve the goal of Increased Public Engagement, FSG will enhance 
its selection of exhibitions and complementary public programs to engage a 
broader segment of Smithsonian visitors, as well as expand the number and 
range of exhibitions and objects offered to other museum sites across the 
nation and internationally. Associated with these activities will be a 
continued emphasis on exhibition-related scholarly research and an increased 
Web presence. To support the goal of Enhanced Management Excellence, 
FSG will actively participate in programs designed to improve the 
institution's management and financial systems and will continue to evaluate 
and modernize its internal organization and systems to provide a high level of 
service to visitors and other customers. 

For FY 2005, the estimate includes an increase of $197,000 for 
necessary pay for existing staff funded under this line item. 

MEANS AND STRATEGY 

To achieve the goal of Increased Public Engagement, the exhibition 
program will be expanded to bring more noted loan exhibitions to the 
museums. Significant exhibitions anticipated for FY 2005 include IPEK, an 
exhibition of Ottoman silks and velvets from public and private collections 
from the U.S. and abroad, notably Turkey; Asian Games: The Art of Contest, 
an exhibition that explores the role of games as social and cultural activities 
in pre-modern Asia, and the marriage of military science and art often 
embedded in games; and Arabia the Blessed: Yemen and the incense Trade 
in Antiquity, which explores the rich artistic interaction that resulted from 
maritime and overland ties linking ancient kingdoms of Arabia, Africa, and 
Asia. Asian Games will be organized with the Asia Society of New York. 
Accompanying each exhibition will be family-friendly educational 
programming that will enhance the museum experience. 

To expand national outreach efforts, FSG is planning several enhanced 
exhibition programs. FSG is forming a network of museum partners, to 
whom the FSG will offer a regular program on the arts of Asia to strengthen 



138 



collegial ties and bring Smitlisonian collections to new audiences. The FSG's 
As/a in America program seeks to showcase the holdings of important 
American institutional collections of Asian art through an ongoing series of 
exhibitions presented at the Sackler, once more strengthening ties with other 
cultural institutions throughout the nation. Through the FSG's Point of View 
program, a wide net will be cast for new scholarly viewpoints, particularly 
those of young scholars. In this series, FSG's collection will be presented in 
highly focused, engaging installations so as to concentrate attention and 
contribute to the dialogue about Asian art. Additionally, in cooperation with 
the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES), a selection 
from the Sackler's collection of Chinese jades, Magic, Myths, and Minerals, 
will travel to approximately a dozen venues. 

Resources will continue to be devoted to scholarly research in support 
of public programs. Curators and researchers will be studying and publishing 
new research regarding the recent gift to the Sackler of ancient Chinese art 
by Dr. Paul Singer, as well as collections of ancient Chinese jades and the 
Freer's incomparable collection of Biblical manuscripts. To provide greater 
access to high-quality educational resources, the museums will be looking 
more carefully at state-mandated educational programming to ensure that 
FSG's programs are curriculum-based. In addition, more effort will be 
devoted to placing educational resources on the FSG website to make it the 
premier online resource in the country for information on the arts of Asia. 

In the area of collections management, FSG will continue to devote 
resources to maintaining the outstanding conservation and scientific research 
programs currently in place for the analysis, study, and conservation of 
Asian art and objects. This research work will help guarantee that objects 
from FSG's collections and many other museums remain accessible to future 
generations. The staff of the internationally renowned conservation 
department and laboratory is very active internationally in symposia, 
lectures, and publications, as well as in the support and mentoring of 
numerous fellows and scholars. FSG plans to offer at least one symposium 
for serious art collectors during FY 2005. At this symposium, curators will 
offer their expertise in analyzing the nature and provenance of collectors' 
objects and will hopefully open doors for future donations to enhance the 
museums' collections. 

Improvements in visitor services are expected during FY 2005, 
primarily as a result of additional surveys and improved signage and 
wayfinding. FSG expects to survey visitors to determine their interest in the 
use of increased technology in exhibitions as well as in the use of hand-held 
self-tour electronic guides. FSG will continue to focus on making its 
collections accessible to the public at large through its website. The focus of 



139 



the current website will be redirected to expand the number of objects 
available for viewing and research by a national and international audience. 

To achieve the goal of Enhanced Management Excellence, FSG 
expects to play a continuing leadership role in developing sophisticated 
collections management systems. In addition, as the new Institution-wide 
financial and human resources systems are implemented, it is anticipated 
that they will result in improved administrative efficiencies and reporting 
mechanisms within FSG. 

STRATEGIC GOALS AND FY 2005 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE GOALS 

Increased Public Engagement 

Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and other public programs 
(16 FTEs and $1,378,000) 

• Mount at least two international exhibitions that attract increased 
visitation over the same time period in FY 2004 

• Provide family-friendly educational programming for each major 
exhibition 

Expand a national outreach effort (9 FTEs and $937,000) 

• Develop one new curriculum based on state-mandated guidelines 
and distribute to schools by the end of FY 2005 

• Increase by 10% the number of website visitors over FY 2004 

• Increase by 30% the number of FSG objects available on the 
website over FY 2004 

• Place FSG objects in at least two non-FSG exhibitions at other 
institutions in FY 2005 

Strengthen the high caliber of Smithsonian scholarship in support of 
public programs (10 FTEs and $ 1, 169,000) 

• Use FSG scholarly research to enhance at least 50% of the 

FY 2005 exhibitions through publications, educational programs, or 
lectures 

• Increase the number of published books and articles authored by 
professional staff by 10% over FY 2004 

• Revive historical collaboration with the University of Michigan and 
explore links with other university departments 

• Advance professional and public understanding of Asian art 
through conservation studies by a 10% increase in publications or 
drafts submitted for publication over FY 2004 

Develop and bring first-class educational resources to the nation 
(6 FTEs and $486,000) 

• Increase the number of attendees at family programs by 10% over 
FY 2004 



140 



• Develop a self-guided tour for the permanent collection by the end 
of FY 2005 

Improve the stewardship of the national collections (8 FTEs and 
$913,000) 

• Organize one symposium for serious art collectors 

• Initiate at least one new fellowship or scholarly award in FY 2005 

• Raise the profile of the Conservation Department through a 10% 
increase in publication over FY 2004 

• Complete conservation on at least 1 00 FSG objects 

Deliver the highest quality visitor services (2 FTEs and $ 1 16,000) 

• Use the FY 2004 visitor survey results to implement at least two 
recommended improvements in visitor services 

Enhanced Management Excellence 

Modernize the Institution's financial management systems and 
functions (5 FTEs and $604,000) 

• Use the new Enterprise Resource Planning System modules to 
improve monthly tracking of budget vs. actual and to enhance 
management reports for senior staff and Board members 

• Reduce by 10% the number of purchase orders generated through 
purchase card improvements and consolidation of orders 

Modernize the Institution's information technology systems and 
Infrastructure (4 FTEs and $384,000) 

• Finalize installation of the latest software for The Museum System 
(TMS), FSG's collections information system 



141 



COOPER-HEWITT, NATIONAL DESIGN MUSEUM 





APPLICATION OF OPERATING RESOURCES 


FEDERAL 
APPROPRIATIONS 


GENERAL 
TRUST 


DONOR/SPONSOR 
DESIGNATED 


GOV'T GRANTS 
& CONTRACTS 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FY 2003 
ESTIMATE 


40 


3,030 


32 


2,968 


2 


3,318 





15 


FY 2004 
ESTIMATE 


40 


3,126 


32 


3,057 


2 


3,300 








FY 2005 
ESTIMATE 


40 


3,232 


32 


3,149 


2 


2,862 









STRATEGIC GOALS: INCREASED PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT; ENHANCED 

MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE 

Federal Resource Summary by Performance Objective 



Performance 
Objective 


FY 
FTE 


2004 
$000 


FY 
FTE 


2005 
$000 


Ch 
FTE 


lange 
$000 
















Increased Public Engagement: 














Offer compelling first-class exhibitions and other 
public programs 


7 


487 


7 


498 





11 


Expand a national outreach effort 


2 


126 


2 


130 





4 


Strengthen the high caliber of Smithsonian 
scholarship in support of public programs 


8 


610 


9 


694 


1 


84 


Develop and bring first-class educational resources 
to the nation 


4 


319 


3 


286 


-1 


-33 


Enhanced Management Excellence: 














Modernize the Institution's financial management 
systems and functions 


5 


304 


5 


313 





9 


Modernize the Institution's information technology 
systems and infrastructure 


1 


98 


1 


101 





3 


Execute an aggressive, long range Smithsonian 
facilities program 


13 


1,182 


13 


1,210 





28 


Total 


40 


3,126 


40 


3,232 





106 



BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT 

The Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum (OHM), located in New 
York City, explores and investigates the impact of design on daily life— from 
500 BC textile designs to 21*^ century architecture. The Museum is 



142 



interested in all aspects of design, including urban planning, architecture, 
industrial design, landscaped design, interior design, textiles, advertising, and 
graphic arts. 

As the only museum in America devoted exclusively to historical and 
contemporary design, CHM pursues its mission through award-winning 
exhibitions, publications, and educational programs for design professionals, 
the public, and school children. To achieve the Institution's goal of Increased 
Public Engagement, the Museum will continue its tradition of offering high- 
caliber exhibitions, as well as expanding the number of objects and Museum 
programs offered in venues outside the New York metropolitan area. In 
conjunction with these activities will be a continued emphasis on high-quality 
educational programs and exhibition-related scholarly research. To meet the 
goal of Enhanced Management Excellence, CHM will devote resources to 
upgrading and improving the efficiency of some of its services to visitors. 

For FY 2005, the estimate includes an increase of $106,000 for 
necessary pay for existing staff funded under this line item. 

MEANS AND STRATEGY 

To achieve the goal of Increased Public Engagement, Cooper-Hewitt 
will concentrate its resources on maintaining an exhibition program that 
features a mixture of important designers, design concepts, and popular 
culture. This mixture is particularly popular with New York audiences and 
emphasizes the Museum's unique place in the international museum 
community. During FY 2005, Cooper-Hewitt will stage one major design 
retrospective, Josef and Anni Albers: Designs for Living, and two 
contemporary exhibitions. Furniture and Design by Minimalist and Post- 
iWinimalist Artists and Extreme Textiles: Design for High Performance. 

As part of its national outreach effort, Cooper-Hewitt plans to expand 
its City of Neighborhoods program to five venues outside the New York City 
area in FY 2005. This innovative program brings architects, educators, and 
planners together to extend the classroom into the community and apply 
design education to a neighborhood concept, enabling teachers to take this 
model back to the classroom for development of similar programs for K-1 2 
students. The program's goal is to use design to promote community 
awareness and to involve young people in positive community change. The 
Museum also will offer an expanded Summer Design Institute program on the 
West Coast as well as in New York City. This program is also geared to K-1 2 
and design educators, and draws a steadily increasing national audience each 
year. Outreach will be further enhanced by a continued effort to lend major 
works to other venues within the United States. 



143 



Resources will continue to support exhibition-related scholarly research 
in order to create the most innovative and educational exhibitions for the 
public to view. The Museum anticipates that important new research will be 
published in conjunction with each major exhibition presented in FY 2005. 
Catalogues are anticipated for the Alters, Furniture and Design and Extreme 
Textiles exhibitions, dependent on securing private publication funding. In 
addition, another rotation of the Collection Gallery will be on display. 

Cooper-Hewitt hopes to make its educational opportunities available to 
a broader audience in FY 2005 through greater use of technology. In 
particular, the Museum plans to devote resources for increasing the 
accessibility of CHM education programs through video and the Internet. 
This will include components of the City of Neighborhoods program and the 
Summer Design Institute program, which educators can then adapt to their 
classrooms. 

To achieve the goal of Enhanced Management Excellence, Cooper- 
Hewitt expects a significant number of financial reporting and budgeting 
improvements in FY 2005 as the new Institution-wide financial and human 
resources systems are implemented. It is anticipated that these 
improvements will result in improved administrative efficiencies within CHM. 
In addition, improved technological capabilities will allow the Museum to 
upgrade some internal systems, such as telephones and online ticketing for 
public education programs. 

STRATEGIC GOALS AND FY 2005 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE GOALS 

Increased Public Engagement 

Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and other public programs 
(7 FTEs and $498,000) 

• Mount two exhibitions involving items from popular culture 
Expand a national outreach effort (2 FTEs and $ 130,000) 

• Provide at least one stimulating education program for the 
community 

Strengthen the high caliber of Smithsonian scholarship in support of 
public programs (9 FTEs and $694,000) 

• Provide three public research catalogues for major exhibitions 
Develop and bring first-class educational resources to the nation 
(3 FTEs and $286,000) 

• Establish three collections of educational resources geared to 
diverse national audiences 



144 



Enhanced Management Excellence 

Modernize the Institution's financial management systems and 
functions (5 FTEs and $313,000) 

• Make the Enterprise Resource Planning System fully functional 
within the Museum environment 

• Present interim and year-end financial information to board and 
senior management within 8 weeks of fiscal-year closure 

Modernize the Institution's information technology systems and 
infrastructure (1 FTE and $101,000) 

• Install the latest versions of hardware/software to meet 
Smithsonian specifications 

Execute an aggressive, long range Smithsonian facilities program 
(13 FTEs and $1,210,000) 

• Install and maintain announcement signs for four exhibitions in 
three locations outside of the Museum 



145 



HIRSHHORN MUSEUM AND SCULPTURE GARDEN 





APPLICATION OF OPERATING RESOURCES 


FEDERAL 
APPROPRIATIONS 


GENERAL 
TRUST 


DONOR/SPONSOR 
DESIGNATED 


GOV'T GRANTS 
& CONTRACTS 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FY 2003 
ESTIMATE 


65 


4,693 


1 


745 


2 


2,308 








FY 2004 
ESTIMATE 


49 


4,150 


1 


836 


3 


2,773 








FY 2005 
ESTIMATE 


49 


4,288 


1 


661 


3 


4,600 









STRATEGIC GOALS: INCREASED PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT; ENHANCED 

MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE 

Federal Resource Summary by Performance Objective 



Performance 
Objective 


FY 
FTE 


2004 
$000 


FY 
FTE 


2005 
$000 


c^ 

FTE 


lange 
$000 
















Increased Public Engagement: 














Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and other 
public programs 


24 


2,100 


21 


1,833 


-3 


-267 


Expand a national outreach effort 


4 


210 


7 


559 


3 


349 


Strengthen the high caliber of Smithsonian 
scholarship in support of public programs 


1 


95 


2 


174 


1 


79 


Improve the stewardship of the national collections 


9 


810 


9 


712 





-98 


Enhanced Management Excellence: 














Strengthen an Institutional culture that is 
customer-centered and results-oriented 


7 


605 


8 


786 


1 


181 


Enhance the reputation of the Smithsonian by 
maintaining good relations with the news media 
and with federal, state, and local governments 


3 


250 


2 


224 


-1 


-26 


Ensure safety and protection of Smithsonian 
facilities, national collections, staff, visitors, and 
volunteers 


1 


80 








-1 


-80 


Total 


49 


4,150 


49 


4,288 





138 



146 



BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT 

The mission of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden (HMSG) 
is to collect, preserve, and exhibit the art and artists of our time; to develop 
educational materials and conduct programs to increase public understanding 
of and involvement in the development of modern and contemporary art on 
an international scale; and to conduct and disseminate new research in the 
study of modern and contemporary art. 

To achieve the Institution's goal of Increased Public Engagement, 
HMSG is focusing a substantial portion of its resources on producing a 
compelling exhibition program based on the work of international modern and 
contemporary artists, as well as providing national outreach through its 
website, catalogues, collaborations, and traveling exhibitions. Associated 
with these activities is a continued emphasis on the development of 
educational materials, public programs, exhibition-related scholarly research, 
and refinement, care, and management of the national collections. To 
support the goal of Enhanced Management Excellence, HMSG will use the 
implementation of Institution-wide management and financial systems to 
more effectively manage resources within the Museum, promote and 
maintain a diverse workforce and culture of equal opportunity, and begin to 
implement a long range strategic plan. 

For FY 2005, the estimate includes an increase of $138,000 for 
necessary pay for existing staff funded under this line item. 

MEANS AND STRATEGY 

To achieve the goal of Increased Public Engagement, HMSG is 
directing resources to activities that will enhance public access to its 
collections. Activities will include exhibitions both at HMSG and on tour, 
loans to other institutions, publications based on scholarly research, 
educational resources and events based on the collections, and an increased 
Web presence. Significant exhibitions during FY 2005 include the 
Washington opening of Cuban-born artist. Ana Mendienta; Chinese artist Cai 
Guo Qiang; Japanese American artist, Isamu Noguchi; and the Washington 
opening of Visual Music 1 905-2005. The Gyroscope series, a Museum-wide 
installation of the Hirshhorn's permanent collection featuring recent 
acquisitions from the last five years, will continue with new groupings and 
juxtapositions of more familiar works, and the Directions series of solo 
exhibitions by contemporary artists will provide a wide range of stimulating 
experiences for repeat and first-time visitors alike. 



147 



On national and international levels, the Hirshhorn will tour Ana 
Mendienta at the Des Moines Art Center and at one other venue. Visual 
Music 1905-2005 will open in Los Angeles before its Washington debut. An 
exhibition of work by Japanese artist Hiroshi Sugimoto, organized by the 
Hirshhorn for the 2006 season, is expected to open in Tokyo in late 
FY 2005. The Museum will also continue to lend art to other institutions, 
allowing visitors in other cities and countries the opportunity to see portions 
of the national collection. 

Resources will be used to support scholarly research for a number of 
the planned exhibitions such as Visual Music, Cai Guo Qiang, Isamu 
Noguchi, Hiroshi Sugimoto, and the Gyroscope series. Catalogues and other 
publications will enhance the Museum's exhibitions and public programs, 
serving as permanent documentation of the scholarly research performed. 

With the anticipated completion in FY 2005 of renovated space 
dedicated for education and public programs, HMSG will offer its first full 
year of expanded programming to a larger number of schools and institutions 
of higher learning. The multi-purpose room adjacent to the Sculpture Garden 
will provide a flexible environment to accommodate up to 50 participants in 
workshops, small lectures, and training sessions where groups can learn 
about the Museum's collections and create projects of their own. Educational 
resources, including teaching materials and interactive activities, will also be 
available on the Web. 

The website will be upgraded to reach greater numbers of people in a 
more proactive fashion, including free online newsletters for subscribers. In 
addition, updated information about the HMSG collections, including 
additions to and refinement of database-stored information and digital 
images, will be available to the public via the website. 

To achieve the goal of Enhanced Management Excellence, HMSG will 
continue to participate in the implementation of the new Institution-wide 
financial and human resources system to manage resources in a more 
efficient manner. With the anticipated retirement of a number of staff in the 
next few years, HMSG will have an unprecedented opportunity to diversify 
its workforce. Based on the results of a space study completed in FY 2003, 
the Museum will begin a comprehensive, long-range plan to accommodate 
future public and support needs and to set goals for future support. 

Trust funds will supplement federal resources to continue the 
reorganization of the Museum's external affairs activities. This reorganization 
will result in an integrated communication and marketing effort to expand the 
quantity and quality of the public's access to and understanding of the 



148 



Museum. Visitor surveys conducted on site and through the Web will help to 
focus efforts to increase both the number and quality of visitor experiences 
at the Museum. In addition, the number of media contacts will be increased 
and the media pool will be expanded to reach a greater national and 
international audience outside of the Washington DC area. 

STRATEGIC GOALS AND FY 2005 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE GOALS 

Increased Public Engagement 

Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and other public programs 
(21 FTEs and $1,833,000) 

• Increase attendance by 2% over the FY 2004 level 

• Produce at least one collaborative project (exhibition or public 
program) with other International Art museums 

Expand a national outreach effort (7 FTEs and $559,000) 

• Maintain the number of visitors attending HMSG traveling 
exhibitions at the same level as FY 2004 

• Maintain the number of outgoing loans at the FY 2004 level 

• Increase the number of website visits and length of visits by 10% 
Strengthen the high caliber of Smithsonian scholarship in support of 
public programs (2 FTEs and $174,000) 

• Use HMSG research to produce at least one major exhibition 

• Publish at least one catalogue or book on the Museum's collection 
or in conjunction with a Hirshhorn-generated exhibition 

Improve the stewardship of the national collections (9 FTEs and 
$712,000} 

• Increase access to the permanent collection by increasing the 
number of collection records and/or images on the website and in 
the art database by 25% over the FY 2004 level 

Enhanced Management Excellence 

Strengthen an Institutional culture that is customer-centered and 
results-oriented (8 FTEs and $786,000) 

• Link the HMSG strategic plan and annual performance plan to the 
Smithsonian strategic plan 

• Complete the reorganization of Museum staff with full initial 
staffing in all departments 

Enhance the reputation of the Smithsonian by maintaining good 
relations with the news media and with federal, state, and local 
governments (2 FTEs and $224,000) 

• Increase story ideas to the media about HMSG exhibitions, 
research, and programs by 10% over FY 2004 



149 



NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN ART 





APPLICATION OF OPERATING RESOURCES | 


FEDERAL 
APPROPRIATIONS 


GENERAL 
TRUST 


DONOR/SPONSOR 
DESIGNATED 


GOV'T GRANTS 
& CONTRACTS 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FY 2003 

ESTIMATE 


48 


4,435 


1 


341 


1 


453 








Pr- 2004 
ESTIMATE 


48 


4,566 


1 


345 


1 


827 








FY 2005 
ESTIMATE 


48 


4,716 


1 


321 


1 


640 









STRATEGIC GOALS: INCREASED PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT; ENHANCED 

MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE 

Federal Resource Summary by Performance Objective 



Performance 
Objective 


FY 
FTE 


2004 
$000 


FY 

FTE 


2005 
$000 


FTE 


lange 
$000 


Increased Public Engagement: 














Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and other 
public programs 


18 


1,690 


24 


2,433 


6 


743 


Expand a national outreach effort 


6 


489 


9 


749 


3 


260 


Strengthen the high caliber of Smithsonian scholarship 
in support of public programs 


4 


301 








-4 


-301 


Develop and bring first-class educational resources to 
the nation 


3 


337 


8 


859 


5 


522 


Improve the stewardship of the national collections 


6 


615 








-6 


-615 


Deliver the highest quality visitor services 


2 


116 








-2 


-116 


Enhanced Management Excellence: 














Strengthen an Institutional culture that is customer- 
centered and results-oriented 


5 


600 


3 


264 


-2 


-336 


Modernize the Institution's financial management 
systems and functions 


1 


69 








-1 


-69 


Modernize the Institution's information technology 
systems and infrastructure 


1 


147 


2 


228 


1 


81 


Ensure that the Smithsonian's workforce is efficient, 
collaborative, committed, and innovative 








1 


102 


1 


102 


Enhance the reputation of the Smithsonian by 
maintaining good relations with the news media, and 
with federal, state, and local governments 


1 


89 


1 


81 





-8 


Ensure safety and protection of Smithsonian facilities, 
national collections, staff, visitors, and volunteers 


1 


113 








-1 


-113 


Total 


48 


4,566 


48 


4,716 





150 



150 



BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT 

The National Museum of African Art (NMAfA) fosters and sustains — 
through exhibitions, collections, research, and public programs — an interest 
in and an understanding of the diverse cultures in Africa as embodied in 
aesthetic achievements in the visual arts. The Museum accepts into its 
collections and exhibitions the arts of all African areas including the ancient 
and contemporary arts of the entire continent. Museum-sponsored research, 
publications, and educational programs reflect and are in consonance with 
the Museum's collection, research, and exhibition goals. 

To achieve the Institution's goal of Increased Public Engagement, 
NMAfA is focusing its resources on installing two temporary exhibitions and 
developing innovative educational and public programs related to these 
exhibitions. In addition, NMAfA will continue to dedicate resources to digital 
technology, free publications for visitors of all ages, and recent research In 
the documentation of the collection for educational purposes. Resources will 
also be dedicated to the renovation and redesign of the galleries on the first 
level of the north side as part of the continuing reinstallation of NMAfA's 
permanent collection. Toward the goal of Enhanced Management Excellence, 
NMAfA will focus on improved staff communication and accountability as 
well as greater staff involvement in the Museum's activities and operations. 
Efforts will also be made to increase the Museum's public visibility through 
the news media and to develop relationships with federal and local 
governments. 

For FY 2005, the estimate includes an increase of $150,000 for 
necessary pay for existing staff funded under this line item. 

MEANS AND STRATEGY 

To achieve the goal of Increased Public Engagement, NMAfA is 
directing its resources to activities that will result in increased visitation and 
will attract more culturally and age-diverse audiences. Two exhibitions. 
Textures and Inscribing IVieaning, will present pre-modern to contemporary 
works from the entire continent of Africa and the various ways through 
which knowledge is transmitted and learning occurs. These exhibitions will 
provide the American public with a broader understanding of African culture 
and society as represented through familiar and unfamiliar artistic traditions 
and forms. Both exhibitions will provide opportunities for effective outreach 
to the public and linkages to schools because of the focus on writing, script, 
and knowledge. In addition, both shows will provide a vast array of media 
and forms that are familiar and unusual, all of which should provide a strong 
visual appeal to scholars and popular audiences. 



151 



A third exhibition, tentatively titled Treasures at the National Museum 
of African Art, is a three-year project that will result in the renovation of the 
Museum's first level galleries on the north side, and reinstallation of the 
Museum's permanent collection, which has remained virtually unchanged 
since the Museum's opening in 1987. Phase I, to be completed in FY 2004, 
consists of renovating the Sylvia Williams Gallery. Phase II in FY 2005 will 
complete major renovation and reinstallation of the north galleries. On display 
will be works from the Museum's permanent collection, along with loans of 
African art masterpieces from major private and museum collections. These 
projects will provide attractions aimed at new and current audiences, thereby 
increasing the number of visitors to the Museum. The use of varied 
exhibition and design techniques and digital technology will allow enhanced 
understanding of African art, culture and history. 

Education at NMAfA will include non-traditional educational and public 
programs as well as the more traditional student-teacher programs. NMAfA 
will implement an interactive family educational component using audio/video 
components in Treasures at the National Museum of African Art. Non- 
traditional programs will include hands-on family programs and workshops 
for children. A new program. Summer Children's Art Camps, will provide 
better connectivity between art and learning, resulting also in at-home 
projects. Learning modules linked within the Museum's website will support 
NMAfA's national outreach efforts by providing access to the collection 
through schools, public libraries and homes. 

NMAfA will develop an educational strategic plan providing for broad- 
based educational opportunities for adults and non-traditional learners, 
especially those in underserved communities. The focus on literacy and 
learning in Inscribing Meaning provides an excellent opportunity for the 
Museum to increase outreach efforts to schools and community 
organizations. As part of the educational strategic plan, NMAfA will develop 
templates for evaluation of the effectiveness of its programs and activities. 

The Museum will continue to devote resources to research that results 
in quality exhibitions and publications including exhibition catalogues. Special 
pamphlets and guides associated with Textures, Inscribing Meaning and 
Treasures at the National Museum of African Art will be offered free to the 
public. For example. Treasures will have a family guide that provides learning 
games for children and projects that involve the entire family. 

NMAfA will continue to use digital technology to provide online 
cataloguing of the Warren M. Robbins Library and Eliot Elisofon Photographic 
Archives and access to the collection through the Museum's website. 



152 



NMAfA will also continue to modify and incorporate new technology and 
techniques to make its website more appealing for visitors outside the 
Washington DC area and include information directed to audiences of all 
ages. 

To address the goal of Enhanced Management Excellence, NMAfA will 
focus on strengthening an institutional culture that is audience-centered and 
results-oriented. Accountability will be achieved by integrating budget and 
performance goals in performance plans for department heads. This will 
result in improved management of specific projects and programs, as well as 
ensuring more cost-effective operations. Projects and programs will be 
developed to target specific but diverse audiences, and the Museum's 
outreach will be tracked for its effectiveness. In addition, the Museum will 
continue its goal of instituting project-specific committees with 
interdepartmental representation, thus establishing a more cooperative 
environment for improved communication and greater involvement of staff in 
NMAfA's operations and activities. Information technology efforts will center 
on using digital technology to develop and implement templates for online 
public information in order to increase capacity and efficiency. The Museum 
will also take proactive steps to enhance relations with the media and local 
governments. 

STRATEGIC GOALS AND FY 2005 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE GOALS 

Increased Public Engagement 

Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and other public programs (24 
FTEs and $2,433,000) 

• Present two exhibitions with broad appeal in order to attract more 
age- and culturally diverse audiences, especially teachers and 
students 

• Implement Phase II of the reinstallation of the permanent collection 
in order to bring more visitors into the Museum 

Expand a national outreach effort (9 FTEs and $749,000) 

• Implement an interactive family educational component in 
Treasures at the National Museum of African Art in order to reach 
new and more diverse audiences 

• Enhance the current website to increase virtual visitors by 20% 

• Increase online cataloguing of library and archive holdings by 5% in 
order to increase audiences and increase accessibility to the 
collections for audiences outside the Washington, DC area 

• Focus on literacy and learning with one educational initiative that is 
highlighted in Inscribing Meaning in order to enhance outreach to 
schools and community organizations in underserved, especially 
African American, communities in Washington, DC 



153 



Develop and bring first-class educational resources to the nation (8 
FTEs and $859,000) 

• Develop an educational strategic plan in order to provide broad- 
based educational opportunities for adults and non-traditional 
learners, especially from underserved communities 

• Develop and use one system/model for evaluating the relevance 
and effectiveness of the Museum's programs and activities in order 
to determine the impact of the Museum's educational resources 
upon its audiences 

• Develop complementary yet interrelated sets of free publications to 
function as supplemental educational resources for adults and 
children in order to enhance learning and increase an interest in 
African Art and culture 

Enhanced Management Excellence 

Strengthen an Institutional culture that is customer-centered and 
results-oriented (3 FTEs and $264,000) 

• Integrate performance goals in the performance plans of all 
department heads 

• Develop recommendations related to specific projects and programs 
that identify targeted audiences (age- and culturally diverse) in 
order to track effective outreach 

Modernize the Institution's information technology systems and 
infrastructure (2 FTEs and $228,000) 

• Implement a template for information management that will 
increase capacity and speed by 50% for dissemination of Museum 
information in order to expand and improve audience outreach and 
seasonal changes in visitation 

Ensure that the Smithsonian workforce is efficient, collaborative, 
committed, and innovative (1 FTE and $102,000) 

• Implement project-specific committees that include 
interdepartmental representation in order to improve 
communications and increase staff participation in the activities 
and operations of the Museum 

Enhance the reputation of the Smithsonian by maintaining good 
relations with the news media and with federal, state and local 
governments (1 FTE and $81,000) 

• Increase reviews of exhibitions in the print media by 1 00% by 
developing stronger relationships with the news media in order to 
increase NMAfA's public visibility 



154 



NATIONAL MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY 





APPLICATION OF OPERATING RESOURCES 


FEDERAL 
APPROPRIATIONS 


GENERAL 
TRUST 


DONOR/SPONSOR 
DESIGNATED 


GOV'T GRANTS 
& CONTRACTS 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FY 2003 
ESTIMATE 


514 


44,690 


9 


1,672 


30 


9,881 


17 


3,345 


FY 2004 
ESTIMATE 


436 


43,319 


9 


1,672 


26 


9,947 


17 


3,138 


FY 2005 
ESTIMATE 


438 


47,086 


9 


1,672 


26 


9,230 


17 


2,038 



STRATEGIC GOALS: INCREASED PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT; STRENGTHENED 
SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH; ENHANCED MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE 

Federal Resource Summary by Performance Objective 



Performance Objective 


FY 
FTE 


2004 
$000 


FY 
FTE 


2005 
$000 


Ch 
FTE 


ange 
$000 
















Increased Public Engagement: 














Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and 
other public programs 


50 


5,023 


51 


5,358 


1 


335 


Expand a national outreach effort 


58 


5,214 


58 


5,429 





215 


Improve the stewardship of the national 
collections 


158 


14,524 


159 


16,610 


1 


2,086 


Strengthened Scientific Research: 














Conduct focused scientific research programs 
that are recognized nationally and 
internationally 


144 


15,804 


144 


16,838 





1,034 


Enhanced Management Excellence: 














Strengthen an Institutional culture that is 
customer-centered and results-oriented 


10 


1,098 


10 


1,135 





37 


Modernize the Institution's information 
technology systems and infrastructure 


12 


1,238 


12 


1,283 





45 


Execute an aggressive, long-range Smithsonian 
facilities program 


2 


200 


2 


207 





7 


Ensure safety and protection of facilities, 
national collections, staff, visitors, and 
volunteers 


2 


218 


2 


226 





8 


Total 


436 


43,319 


438 


47,086 


2 


3,767 



155 



BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT 

The mission of the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) is to 
investigate, document, and understand the natural world and the role of 
humans in it. Building upon its unique collections and associated data, field 
research stations, specialized laboratories, and internationally recognized 
team of scientists, research associates, federal agency partners, and fellows, 
the Museum provides fundamental research information to a wide array of 
constituencies ranging from federal agencies to the public. The Museum's 
particular strengths are in the following three areas: formation and evolution 
of Earth and other planets, discovering and understanding life's diversity, and 
understanding human diversity and cultural change. The Museum's research 
provides new insights, authenticity, and relevance to broader national and 
international science agendas looking at such important societal issues as 
global change, biodiversity, cultural conflict, and natural hazards. 

The Museum's stewardship of its collection of more than 125 million 
natural science specimens is at the core of its mission. This collection, the 
largest of its kind, forms an unparalleled information resource on the 
diversity of life on Earth, including plants, animals, fossils, minerals, and 
human artifacts. NMNH collections and their attendant information are a 
dynamic resource utilized by researchers, educators, and policymakers 
worldwide. 

The results of NMNH's first-class research support its exhibitions and 
educational outreach. As one of the most visited museums in the world, 
NMNH provides diverse public audiences with exciting and informative 
presentations on every aspect of life on Earth. Through affiliations and 
partnerships, the Museum takes its science and public programs beyond the 
National Mall to other museums and non-traditional exhibition venues, such 
as libraries, schools, and universities. With a growing network of interactive 
websites, the Museum is transforming itself into a true electronic classroom, 
potentially accessible to everyone. 

The FY 2005 budget estimate includes a net increase of $3,767,000 
and 2 FTEs. Included are an increase of $1,617,000 for necessary pay for 
existing staff, and a one-time decrease of $1,000,000 to the Repatriation 
Program. NMNH is seeking program increases of $3,150,000 and two FTEs 
to support ongoing collections care, research and collections information 
systems, and exhibits maintenance operations. 



156 



MEANS AND STRATEGY 

To achieve the goal of Increased Public Engagement, funding will be 
used to convert outdated offerings into a stimulating program of integrated, 
multidisciplinary, and interactive exhibitions on the Mall and in other venues 
through traveling exhibits and electronic outreach across the country. In 
FY 2005, NMNH is committed to continue progress on renovating its 
permanent halls and offering new temporary exhibitions each year. NMNH 
will complete design for the renovation of two permanent halls, the 
Ocean/Marine Hall and the 4.6 Billion Years Hall, totaling 24,000 square feet 
of exhibition space. The temporary exhibitions planned for 2005 include 
Written in Bone, Metraux: From Voodoo to IHuman Riglits, and the Asian 
Focus Gallery. Federal funding also enables NMNH to make its exhibitions 
available to other U.S. and International institutions. The excitement and 
effectiveness of NMNH exhibitions and presentations can be seen in their 
popularity with family audiences. In FY 2003, NMNH hosted over 7 million 
visits. 

In FY 2005, the Museum's commitment to education will continue 
through support for ongoing programs, an extensive national/international 
network that includes traveling exhibitions, interactive electronic classrooms 
and field trips, and its website. These outreach efforts serve millions of 
visitors each year, nationally and internationally. In FY 2005, NMNH will 
develop and broadcast 4 electronic field trips to 1 .5 million students across 
the nation in cooperation with local school districts and television studios, 
hold teacher training sessions, prepare new curriculum packages for 
educators, and continue to upgrade the website to provide additional 
educational programs. 

The Museum's collections serve as the foundation of NMNH research. 
Federal funding is the linchpin for maintaining and preserving these priceless 
collections and their valuable information for future generations while also 
supporting their use for critical ongoing research. In FY 2005, NMNH efforts 
will continue to ensure that this invaluable and unique asset is made 
available to researchers, policymakers, and the public efficiently and 
effectively by digitizing anthropology collections for use by researchers, 
students, and the general public; completing electronic digitization of the 
invaluable botany type specimen collection and making it available 
universally via the World Wide Web; and making over a million records of 
paleobiological, vertebrate zoological, and anthropological collections and 
associated data available via the Web. 

To meet the goal of Strengthened Scientific Research in FY 2005, 
NMNH will build upon its strategic plan and focus on selected hiring and 



157 



initiatives related to new insights in geology/paleobiology, systennatics, 
evolutionary biology, ecology and their relationship to biodiversity, and 
anthropology. The Museum's life sciences programs will be reorganized to 
better concentrate on important and timely research areas and de-emphasize 
others. Research at the Museum will be underpinned by the development of 
vibrant informatics tools that add value to science and policymakers by tying 
research findings to documentation of the Museum's unique collections. 
Publications will have a more integrated quality, bringing insights from all 
viewpoints of the Museum on pressing national and international topics. 

NMNH is committed to expanding the training of the next generation 
of scientists through increasing its post-doctoral fellowship awards and 
continuing its long-term relationship with the National Science Foundation 
(NSF), through the Research Experiences For Undergraduates Program, to 
provide an entry level experience for the most talented undergraduates in the 
natural history sciences. Training of collaborators from overseas will continue 
to be emphasized in order to broaden the international science network. 

In FY 2005, the goal of Enhanced Management Excellence will be 
addressed in part by ongoing construction of a new facility to rehouse 
collections preserved in alcohol currently located on the Mall into a state-of- 
the-art research, conservation, and collection storage facility at the Museum 
Support Center. This facility will ensure that the alcohol collection will 
continue to be available for research in a facility that meets fire and safety 
codes. Additional focus in FY 2005 for the Natural History Building on the 
Mall will continue to be the renovation of major building systems and 
improving security in the building. 

STRATEGIC GOALS AND FY 2005 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE GOALS 

Increased Public Engagement 

Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and other public programs 
(51 FTEs and $5,358,000) 

• Complete design for the renovation of the Ocean/Marine Hall and 
the 4.6 Billion Years Hall, a total of 24,000 square feet of 
exhibition space 

• Open temporary exhibitions Written in Bone and Metraux: From 
Voodoo to Human Rigfits, fulfilling the commitment to change 15% 
of exhibition space annually 

• Open two areas in the Asian Focus Gallery: Korea and Sikh Culture, 
fulfilling the commitment to renovate 3500 square feet of 
exhibition space and make the most current NMNH anthropological 
research available to the public 



158 



• Demonstrate the Museum's work on repatriation through exhibition 
of a Cheyenne funerary object 

• Continue planning, development, and production of 4 study-case 
exhibitions for the ongoing program. Forces of Change, a 
collaboration with NCAA, NSF, and NASA 

Expand a national outreach effort (58 FTEs and $5,429,000) 

• Broadcast 4 science lecture series to 1 .5 million students across 
the nation and hold 4 teacher training seminars 

• Prepare and distribute 50,000 new curriculum packages for each of 
the major exhibitions and electronic programs opening in FY 2005 

• Produce middle and high school curricula called Human Evolution: 
Fossil and Arctiaeological Evidence, which would include electronic 
field trips to Smithsonian field sites in Kenya and China 

• Upgrade the existing Arctic Studies Center website to provide 
additional educational programs for Alaskan and circumpolar 
archaeology and ethnology, including community archaeology 
programs in Labrador 

• Increase the distribution of the free educational publication, 
AnthroNotes: A National Museum of Natural History Publication for 
Educators to 15,000 teachers and anthropologists across the 
country 

Improve the stewardship of the national collections (159 FTEs and 
$16,610,000) 

• Implement a revised collections management policy for the 
Museum to reflect current best standards and practices 

• Complete incorporation of the Ullrich Collection, a unique collection 
of an order of insects (over 125,000 specimens) with particular 
strength in the Eurasian, Southeast Asian, and Egyptian faunas, 
improving the Museum's geographic coverage of biodiversity 
specimens 

• Complete electronic digitization of the valuable botany type 
specimen collection as well as the reference collections of 
Antarctic marine invertebrates, and make them universally available 
via the World Wide Web 

• Initiate an archaeobiology collections improvement project aimed at 
developing an archaeobiology database and addressing storage and 
recording concerns 

• Develop decompression plans and begin rehousing the amphibian 
and reptile collections 

• Update inventory of DNA collections, initiate pilot DNA barcoding 
project, and assess results from samples that were preserved using 
different strategies to recommend best practices for future DNA 
preservation and recovery 



159 



• Purchase and install new collections server(s) that increase storage 
capacity and enhance processing speed 

• Initiate migration into the Electronic Museum (Emu) of transaction 
management records that document acquisition, accession, and 
custody of NMNH's collections as well as borrowed collections 

• Make 1,125,000 records of paleobiologial, entomological, 
vertebrate zoological, and anthropological collections and 
associated data available via the Web 

• Publish the Environment, Origins and Population volume of the 
Department of Anthropology's award-winning twelve-volume 
series, Handbool<. of the American Indian. The new volume presents 
an interdisciplinary review of research addressing Human Origins, 
Plants and Animal Resources, Skeletal Biology, and Human Biology. 

Strengthened Scientific Research 

Conduct focused scientific research programs that are recognized 
nationally and internationally (144 FTEs and $16,838,000} 

• Implement the Museum's strategic plan, linked to the Smithsonian- 
wide Science Enterprise plan, focusing on the three themes below 

Theme II: The Formation and Evolution of Earth and Similar Planets 

• As a partner in the NASA Astrobiology node at the Carnegie 
Institution of Washington, investigate secondary mineral 
assemblages in Martian meteorites that affect the physical and 
chemical conditions near the surface of the planet 

• Conduct chemical and visual studies of Ocean Drilling Program 
samples to reveal the distribution of ocean temperatures during the 
warmest period in earth history, about 1 00 million years ago 

• Study the history of coral reef development in the Caribbean and 
New Guinea to determine the vulnerability of these ecosystems to 
climate change 

• Using a multi-year, multi-organization NSF award, conduct fourth 
year of testing and modeling of the consequences of greenhouse 
warming 55 million years ago 

Theme III: Discovering and Understanding Life's Diversity 

• Determine deep evolutionary relationships in plants, spiders, and 
birds in NSF-funded Tree of Life collaborative projects in order to 
produce a robust phylogeny of all the deepest (oldest) lineages 
within a particular group of organisms, and provide a predictive 
framework for diverse applications, including biological diversity 
studies 

• Continue ongoing fieldwork in Mongolia to study the cultural 
survival of the reindeer herders of northern Mongolia in terms of 
climate change and lichen pasture changes as they relate to the 
survival of the reindeer herds 



160 



• Continue collaborative studies of deep-sea invertebrates in the Gulf 
of Mexico regioh, including exploration of poorly-known areas such 
as cold seeps and petroleum seeps, which are honne to a diverse 
and exotic fauna 

• In collaboration with STRI, continue comprehensive study of 
biology of invertebrate fauna associated with Caribbean coral reefs 
and complete at least ten significant scientific papers 

• Continue inventory, catalog, webpages, and/or manual of Central 
American insects with particular focus on the Costa Rican fauna of 
ground beetles, shore flies, and skipper butterflies 

• Continue molecular studies of introduced avian malaria in Hawaii 
and throughout the world 

• Conduct second year of field and laboratory work on dinosaur 
paleobiology 

• Document the prehistoric ecological changes on the Hawaiian 
islands and in the Caribbean that are responsible for mass 
extinctions of birds, and track bird migrations 

• Continue molecular studies of various endangered mammals in 
Asia, especially on the Indian subcontinent, such as wolves, 
elephants, and Gir Forest lions 

Theme IV: Study of Human Diversity and Culture Change 

• Using a multi-year, multi-organizational NSF award, conduct 
fieldwork in Africa and eastern Asia to examine the relationship of 
climate change and human evolution 

• Initiate a post-doctoral program with 1 -2 targeted 2-3-year post- 
doctoral fellowships awarded to young scholars actively working 
on research concerning the transition to agriculture 

• Complete 2 books on the transition to agriculture, one on the 
process of animal domestication, and another a comprehensive 
overview of low-level food production 

Management Excellence 

Strengthen an Institutional culture that is customer-centered and 
results-oriented (10 FTEs and $1, 135,000) 

• Train 1 00% of staff responsible for financial, budget, procurement, 
and human resources transactions to implement the new ERP, 
including implementation of the Human Resources module, so that 
staff can provide more efficient and effective level of services 

• Assure national re-accreditation by the American Association of 
Museums (AAM) through completion of year-long, in-depth self- 
study and preparation for AAM site visit 



161 



Modernize the Institution's information technology systems and 
infrastructure (12 FTEs and $1,283,000) 

• Ensure that 100% of users of the ERP have compatible hardware 
and software to support all transactions 

Execute an aggressive, long-range Smithsonian facilities program 
(2 FTEs and $207,000) 

• Provide curatorial and technical support for continuing renovation 
of the Natural History Building and the construction of a new 
facility to rehouse collections preserved in alcohol currently located 
on the Mall 

Ensure safety and protection of Smithsonian facilities, national 
collections, staff, visitors, and volunteers (2 FTEs and $226,000) 

• Through extensive inspection and training efforts, provide the 
highest quality safety program to continue to reduce identified 
safety problems and ensure that new problems do not develop 

FY 2005 REQUEST - EXPLANATION OF CHANGE 

The FY 2005 budget estimate includes a net increase of $3,767,000 
and 2 FTEs. Included are an increase of $1,617,000 for necessary pay for 
existing staff, which is justified in the Non-discretionary Costs section of this 
budget, and a one-time decrease of $1,000,000 in the Repatriation Program. 
NMNH is seeking program increases of $3,1 50,000 and 2 FTEs to support 
ongoing collections care, research, and collections information systems, and 
exhibits maintenance operations. The changes are as follows: 
• ( + 1,500,000 + 1 FTE) This increase is to address long-term needs for 
improving and enhancing the ongoing responsibility to maintain the 
Museum's unique national collections. A full-time conservator will assess 
and develop plans for conserving deteriorating biological and geological 
collections as well as exhibited items, and will work with existing 
collections staff to implement strategies for improved conservation across 
the Museum. Contract labor will be used where appropriate. Conservation 
issues related to the planned move of the fluid collections to Pod 5 will be 
addressed through assessments, development of conservation plans and 
strategies, and oversight of procedures regarding such conservation 
problems as failing containers, evaporated fluids, and failing specimen 
and container labels. NMNH proposes to address the increasing demands 
for genetic information by piloting DNA sequencing technology (i.e., "bar 
coding") that rapidly screens and identifies the specimens on the basis of 
their genetic information. Contract labor will rapidly sequence targeted 
collections, including wet collections, for identifying genetic material from 
key species. This bar coding technology will provide important research 
information that also has a public component and will be critical to our 
future management of collections and associated data. Additionally, 



162 



special supplies and services will be purchased to support the need to 
safely transport fluid-preserved collections as part of NMNH's active loan 
program (for example, in FY 2002, 877 outgoing loans of 257,374 
specimens were made). Contract labor will assist existing staff with 
decompressing collections that will remain at NMNH, effectively and 
efficiently using space so that collections items will no longer be severely 
compressed and inaccessible for research and routine curatorial 
inspections. The requested increase will also support critically needed 
archival supplies and equipment, including cabinetry. Outsourced services 
will be focused on improved collections processing and care of fossil, 
skeletal, skin, and plant specimens. 

( + $1,500,000) This increase will support equipment purchases and 
contracts that continue the development of NMNH's Research and 
Collections Information System (RCIS). New computer hardware will 
upgrade the speed of information retrieval, a critical need for ensuring 
quick and easy access by the public as well as efficiency of staff time, 
and will accommodate the increased storage needs of the additional 
1,125,000 records that will result from the Museum's digitization 
projects. Contracts for data capture, data enhancement, public access 
and associated system support will be let. Work will focus on digitization 
and enhancement of biological type collections, specimen catalog 
records, and records that document ownership and custody of the 
NMNH's collections. 

($150,000 + 1 FTE). This request will support the increasing 
maintenance required by exhibitions utilizing new technologies. Computer 
technology creates a more interactive and dynamic exhibit experience but 
requires frequent maintenance and upgrades. This FTE for an exhibits 
specialist and associated funding will improve the operational time from 
82% to 90% for Audio/Visual equipment within the exhibits. 
(-$1,000,000) In addition to these increases, the Institution proposes a 
one-time decrease of $1,000,000 to the National Museum of Natural 
History repatriation program. This is an extremely important program 
established in 1991 to implement the requirements of the National 
Museum of the American Indian Act of 1989. The Act established the 
right of Native American and Native Hawaiian peoples to determine the 
disposition of culturally affiliated human remains and funerary or sacred 
objects in the Smithsonian's collections. Since inception, NMNH has 
repatriated approximately 3,700 skeletal remains and 88,000 associated 
objects to 48 Native communities. However, for the past several years, 
due to hiring and contracting delays, NMNH has not fully utilized its 
annual appropriation in a timely fashion. Therefore, a one-time decrease 
of $1,000,000 is possible with minimum impact on the underlying 
program. The Institution intends to request the restoration of these funds 
in future budgets. 



163 



If the FY 2005 request is not allowed, NMNH will continue to fall 
behind in its mandated responsibility to care for and make readily available 
its unique national collections to researchers and a wide range of other 
users. This in turn will affect the Museum's ability to achieve the objective 
of providing the public with enhanced access to our collections in a more 
timely way and to ensure that the collections entrusted to NMNH are cared 
for in an effective and responsible manner. Further, without this increase, 
visitors to the Museum will find on a more frequent basis exhibits with 
computer-generated interactive features that are not operating because the 
maintenance required to keep these exhibits operating properly is not 
available. 



164 



NATIONAL ZOOLOGICAL PARK 





APPLICATION OF OPERATING RESOURCES 


FEDERAL 
APPROPRIATIONS 


GENERAL 
TRUST 


DONOR/SPONSOR 
DESIGNATED 


GOV'T GRANTS 
& CONTRACTS 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FY 2003 
ESTIMATE 


341 


24,128 


2 


601 


27 


1,824 


5 


503 


FY 2004 
ESTIMATE 


190 


15,924 


2 


554 


26 


2,890 


5 


899 


FY 2005 
ESTIMATE 


195 


17,346 


2 


529 


26 


2,881 


5 


195 



STRATEGIC GOALS: INCREASED PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT; STRENGTHENED 
SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH; ENHANCED MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE 

Federal Resource Summary by Performance Objective 



Performance 
Objective 


FY 
FTE 


2004 
$000 


FY 
hit 


2005 
$000 


Ch 
FTE 


lange 
$000 
















Increased Public Engagement: 














Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and other 
public programs 


135 


11,261 


140 


12,533 


5 


1,272 


Strengthen the high caliber of Smithsonian 
scholarship in support of public programs 


12 


871 


12 


904 





33 


Strengthened Scientific Research: 














Conduct focused scientific research programs that 
are recognized nationally and internationally 


21 


1,525 


21 


1,582 





57 


Enhanced Management Excellence: 














Strengthen an Institutional culture that is customer- 
centered and results-oriented 


22 


2,267 


22 


2,327 





60 


Total 


190 


15,924 


195 


17.346 


5 


1,422 



165 



BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT 

The mission of the National Zoological Park (NZP) is to celebrate, 
study, and protect the diversity of animals and their habitats. NZP exhibits 
living animal and plant collections, conducts research and professional 
training programs in conservation biology and reproductive sciences, and 
provides educational and recreational environments for the visiting public. 
NZP's vision is to broaden public outreach programs, modernize old exhibits, 
and renew the Zoo's role as a leading center for animal care, reproductive 
biology, and conservation research. Through its collections, exhibits, and 
scientific output, NZP inspires and motivates visitors to develop stronger 
bonds with animals and to protect nature. 

Consistent with the overarching goals of the Institution, NZP has 
established specific goals for the future. To achieve the goal of Increased 
Public Engagement, the Zoo will offer compelling first-class exhibits and 
public programs by judiciously building, refining, and caring for the animal 
and plant collection and arranging their exhibition so that they serve as a 
high-quality educational resource. To meet the goal of Strengthened 
Scientific Research, NZP will focus and strengthen scientific excellence in 
veterinary medicine, reproductive sciences, and conservation biology. To 
achieve the goal of Enhanced Management Excellence, the Zoo will execute 
an aggressive long-range facilities maintenance and revitalization plan that 
ensures optimal safety and protection of facilities, collections, visitors, staff, 
and volunteers while supporting modern exhibition and scientific program 
goals. 

For FY 2005, the estimate includes a program increase of 5 FTEs and 
$827,000 to improve the infrastructure for animal health management and 
an increase of $595,000 for necessary pay for existing staff funded under 
this line item. 

This request also includes, beginning in FY 2004, a decrease of 49 
FTEs and $2,399,000 (increased to $2,471,000 in FY 2005 for the pay 
raise) to reflect the transfer of police officers at NZP to the Facilities 
Operations, Security, and Support line item. This restructuring will require 
congressional approval of a reprogramming in FY 2004. The upward trend in 
the demand for security services after September 1 1 , 2001 , has posed major 
challenges for those agencies with significant public exposure like the 
Smithsonian. This realignment will allow for centralized management of the 
Smithsonian's entire security workforce and allow for a common 
management structure, security policies, and consistent training. 



166 



MEANS AND STRATEGY 

To achieve the goal of Increased Public Engagement, NZP will 
continue to devote significant resources to its animal exhibits and the care of 
the animals in the Zoo— as both are essential for the overall health and 
safety of the animal collection — as well as to ensuring a high-quality visitor 
experience. A major portion of the NZP staff and budget will continue to be 
used to provide state-of-the-art medical care, nutrition, health, security, and 
welfare for all NZP animals, as well as safety for staff, visitors, and 
volunteers. 

Animal exhibits will continue to be improved using the strategy of 
customizing or tailoring exhibit spaces that reflect the specific needs of the 
animal species, particularly their overall welfare and behavioral needs. 
Behavioral biology, natural history, and personal history of animal species 
will be incorporated to stimulate natural behaviors for foraging, hunting, and 
breeding. Planned exhibit improvements will expand opportunities for animal 
enrichment; support behavioral, nutritional, or reproductive studies; and 
provide zoo visitors with an inspiring and educational experience. 

A number of aging or failed exhibit areas will continue to undergo 
renovation as NZP continues the major effort to renovate and modernize the 
Zoo. The first phase of the Asia Trail, scheduled for construction in FY 2004 
and opening in FY 2005, will provide homes for animals from the Asian 
subcontinent, most of which are endangered in their native habitats. These 
include sloth bears, clouded leopards, fishing cats, red pandas, Japanese 
giant salamander, and giant pandas. The second phase of Asia Trail— 
primarily for the Asian elephant— is scheduled to complete design in FY 2004 
and begin construction in FY 2005. As in the Amazonia Science Gallery and 
Think Tank, the Zoo will continue to incorporate and link science into 
existing and new exhibits, while increasing the visibility and scope of its 
conservation efforts. 

To achieve the goal of Strengthened Scientific Research, NZP will 
continue to devote resources to addressing significant scientific and 
conservation issues dealing with key species and critical habitats through 
studies of animals in the field and in captive environments. Following the 
development of the Institution's strategic plan for science in early FY 2004, 
NZP will continue the planning process to enhance the integration of science 
and education with exhibits, and to develop areas of expertise among Zoo 
scientists. For example, biologists are studying the veterinary medicine, 
reproductive patterns, behavior, habitat use, interaction with people, and 
population of a number of different endangered species— such as the Asian 
elephant— in captivity and the wild. These studies will be applied to improve 



167 



the management of populations of endangered animals around the world, 
and are often conducted in collaboration with scientific organizations 
worldwide. The results of the Zoo's research will continue to be distributed 
to a wide range of scholars, university researchers, and field biologists. NZP 
will continue to invite research participation and collaboration by students 
and outside colleagues, and to provide opportunities in professional 
development. Such training contributes to placing the Smithsonian Institution 
at the center of international scientific advancement. 

To achieve the goal of Enhanced Management Excellence, the Zoo will 
move toward a customer-centered and results-oriented management style. 
NZP will aggressively execute its long-range renewal plan and continue its 
modernization and improvement programs in the areas of administration, 
budget, and information technology. Infrastructure support to the animal 
exhibits remains an around-the-clock operation to ensure the safety and well- 
being of the collection, visitors, facilities, and staff. 

STRATEGIC GOALS AND FY 2005 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE GOALS 

Increased Public Engagement 

Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and other public programs 
(740 FTEs and $ 12,533,000) 

• Open the first phase of Asia Trail 

• Judiciously build and refine the zoo's animal collection by 
increasing the overall animal collection by 25% through a more 
aggressive breeding program and acquisitions from outside sources 
for new species currently not in the collection 

• Refine the focus of Amazonia to tropical biology by producing at 
least five new science displays and maintaining at least one 
science lab open for public interaction 

• Expand and integrate the website content, allowing visitors to 
continue their learning begun at the Zoo, as measured by increase 
in length of stay by Web visitors 

• Ensure that the highest quality veterinary care, including around- 
the-clock medicine if needed and routine preventive medicine (e.g., 
annual health exams), is provided to 100% of animals 

Strengthen the high caliber of Smithsonian scholarship in support of 
public programs (12 FTEs and $904,000) 

• Ensure scientific participation in the design and planning of NZP's 
animal exhibits by having at least one scientist as a contributing 
member of the core exhibits planning team 

• Include references to Smithsonian research in all exhibits opened in 
FY 2005 

• Widely distribute information from NZP research studies and 



168 



accomplishments via the media and websites and through at least 
6 public presentations by NZP scientists 

• Continue training potential young scientists from the USA and 
abroad by conducting at least five courses in conservation biology 
and/or reproductive sciences 

• Support educator/scientific linkages that promote the conservation 
of biodiversity by offering at least one teacher training workshop at 
the Front Royal facility and two teacher fellowships for educators 
from disadvantaged communities in Africa 

Strengthened Scientific Research 

Conduct focused scientific research programs that are recognized 
nationally and internationally (21 FTEs and $1,582,000) 

Theme III: Discovering and Understanding Life's Diversity 

• Maintain leadership in integrative studies involving giant pandas by 
conducting at least one major study in male and female 
reproductive biology, one in behavior, and one in the ecology of 
giant pandas at NZP and/or with partner organizations within China 

• Conduct at least one study each on the ecology or conservation 
biology of the Golden Lion Tamarins, seals, desert tortoises and kit 
foxes, Asian elephants, and tigers 

• Conduct at least three studies on the reproductive biology of 
endangered felids (cats), canids (dogs), the endangered black- 
footed ferret, and arid-lands antelopes 

• Continue to develop the NZP's genome resource bank by adding 
biomaterials and/or studying the methods of cryopreservation and 
storage from 1 endangered or threatened species 

• Develop at least one comparative ecological study of forest 
habitats in partnership with the Smithsonian Environmental 
Research Center and/or the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute 

• Continue leadership role in the ecology and conservation of 
migratory birds by establishing at least one project that 
collaborates with ornithologists in other Smithsonian units to 
facilitate pan-Institutional efforts 

• Conduct at least one biodiversity monitoring project in Africa and 
Asia 

• Train a minimum of five post-doctoral fellows and 10 graduate 
students (Ph.D. or M.S.) in reproductive sciences or conservation 
biology annually 



169 



Enhanced Management Excellence 

Strengthen an Institutional culture that is customer-centered and 
results-oriented (22 FTEs and $2,327,000) 

• Develop all exhibits to be consistent witii the long-range renewal 
plan 

• Hold regular media briefings four times a year on various activities 
at NZP to include research accomplishments, exhibits, and animal 
management stories 

FY 2005 REQUEST -EXPLANATION OF CHANGE 

The FY 2005 budget estimate Includes a net increase of $1,422,000 
and 5 FTEs. Included is an increase of $595,000 for necessary pay for 
existing staff that is justified in the Non-discretionary Costs section of this 
budget. In addition, NZP is seeking a programmatic increase of 5 FTEs and 
$827,000 to improve the infrastructure for animal health management, 
including pest control, veterinary staff, animal enrichment and exhibit staff, 
and animal records system upgrades. These increases are designed to meet 
defined needs of the NZP as outlined in the 2002-2003 USDA and American 
Zoo and Aquarium Association (AZA) inspection reports. The increases are 
as follows: 

• (-1-$ 166,000, -1-1 FTE) This increase is for Integrated Pest Management 
(IPM) throughout the Zoo's 163-acre park and 29 buildings. Pest 
management at NZP is critical to the health of Zoo animals as well as the 
safety of visitors. The National Institutes of Health and Smithsonian 
horticultural consultants have conducted an in-depth assessment of the 
entire park and recommend establishing a full time IPM Officer position. 
Funding includes salary and benefits for a GS-12 entomologist and new 
supplies needed to help reduce the spread of West Nile Virus, which has 
a major impact on birds and may also affect other species. In addition, an 
outside contract will be required to carry out some pest control services. 

• [ + $356,000, +2 FTEs) This increase is for coordinated animal 
enrichment activities to improve and enhance zoo animal environments 
and welfare within the context of their behavioral biology, natural history, 
and personal history and stimulate their natural behaviors for foraging, 
hunting, and breeding. The recent AZA accreditation report cited NZP for 
not having a coordinated enrichment program. NZP requires an 
Enrichment Coordinator (Animal Behaviorist, GS-12) to plan and 
coordinate enrichment activities at both Rock Creek and Front Royal 
facilities and an Exhibit Fabricator (GS-1 1) to improve animal habitats by 
fabricating artificial tree and rockwork for both animal enrichment and 
overall exhibit appearance. Funding will also support visits to other zoos 
and attendance at professional zoological conferences to gain experience 



170 



from the latest husbandry and enrichment models for the zoological 
community. 

• ( + $230,000, +2 FTE) This increase is to improve medical care for Zoo 
animals. Based on information from numerous zoos across the country, 
NZP has the lowest ratio of clinical veterinarians to animals. Because of 
funding restraints and heavy clinical schedule, veterinarians work 10-1 1 
hour days, 5-6 days a week. Support staff to maintain and service 
valuable hospital equipment is inadequate at times. As the Zoo revitalizes 
its animal collection, funding for one GS-13 veterinarian and one GS-9 
biological technician is needed. Funds are also needed to cover the cost 
of medicine for the animals, as well as travel for veterinarians to 
participate in professional meetings or research projects. 

• ( + $75,000) This increase is to support the development of a modern 
Zoological Information Management System (ZIMS). NZP uses ISIS (an 
international non-profit membership organization with 600 member zoos 
and aquaria) software modules to access histories, treatments, locations, 
and other data critical to the management, husbandry, and health of its 
animals. The current system is obsolete and hard to use, due to older 
technology, and is made up of separate systems for specimen and clinical 
records. ZIMS will provide a global, integrated, comprehensive, real-time. 
Web-based specimen and collection information system. 

The 2002 and 2003 USDA inspections and the 2003 AZA 
accreditation visit for the National Zoo noted improvements needed to the 
infrastructure for animal health management. The above represent the most 
important S&E requirements to ensure that the National Zoo can maintain its 
accreditation and continue to provide quality care to its living collection, and 
improve visitor services. If the FY 2005 request is not allowed, NZP will not 
be able to implement improvements in pest control, enrichment, and animal 
health management, which could place NZP at risk of losing its accreditation. 



171 



SMITHSONIAN ASTROPHYSICAL OBSERVATORY 





APPLICATION OF OPERATING RESOURCES 


FEDERAL 
APPROPRIATIONS 


GENERAL 
TRUST 


DONOR/SPONSOR 
DESIGNATED 


GOV'T GRANTS 
& CONTRACTS 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FY 2003 
ESTIMATE 


128 


20,984 


94 


14,640 


14 


3,509 


278 


79,115 


FY 2004 
ESTIMATE 


124 


21,801 


94 


14,461 


19 


3,505 


278 


79,115 


FY 2005 
ESTIMATE 


124 


22,435 


94 


14,461 


19 


3,505 


279 


79,115 



STRATEGIC GOALS: INCREASED PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT; STRENGTHENED 
SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH; ENHANCED MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE 

Federal Resource Summary by Performance Objective 



Performance 
Objective 


FY 
FTE 


2004 
$000 


FY 
FTE 


2005 
$000 


CI- 
FTE 


lange 
$000 
















Increased Public Engagement: 














Develop and bring first-class educational resources 
to the nation 


5 


800 


5 


825 





25 


Strengthened Scientific Research: 














Conduct focused scientific research programs that 
are recognized nationally and internationally 


115 


20,291 


115 


20,879 





588 


Enhanced Management Excellence: 














Modernize the Institution's information technology 
systems and infrastructure 


1 


370 


1 


375 





5 


Ensure that the Smithsonian's workforce is 
efficient, collaborative, committed, and innovative 


1 


161 


1 


167 





6 


Recnjit, hire, and retain a diverse workforce and 
promote equal opportunity 


2 


179 


2 


189 





10 


Total 


124 


21.801 


124 


22,435 





634 



BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT 

The mission of the Smithsonian Astrophysicai Observatory (SAO) is to 
conduct research to increase understanding of the origin and evolution of the 
universe and to communicate this information through publications, teaching, 
and public presentations. SAO is perhaps the largest and most diverse 



172 



astrophysical institution in the world. It has pioneered the development of 
orbiting observatories and large ground-based telescopes, the application of 
computers to astrophysical problems, and the integration of laboratory 
measurements, theoretical astrophysics, and observations across the 
electromagnetic spectrum. Observational data are gathered by instruments 
aboard rockets, balloons, and spacecraft, as well as by ground-based optical, 
infrared, and gamma-ray telescopes at the Fred Lawrence Whipple 
Observatory in Arizona, by an optical telescope at the Oak Ridge 
Observatory in Massachusetts, by a submiilimeter array nearing completion 
in Hawaii, by a small submiilimeter telescope at the South Pole, and by a 
small millimeter-wave telescope in Massachusetts. Headquartered in 
Cambridge, Massachusetts, SAO is a member of the Harvard-Smithsonian 
Center for Astrophysics, along with the Harvard College Observatory. 

To achieve the goal of Increased Public Engagement, SAO will 
strengthen mechanisms to disseminate the results of its research to 
professional and lay audiences and continue to conduct outstanding national 
programs of science education. SAO will address the goal of Strengthened 
Scientific Research by maintaining its leadership position in astrophysics 
through the high level of productivity of its permanent scientific staff and by 
promoting collaborations with visiting scientists and academic research 
institutions. Enhanced Management Excellence will be achieved by improving 
IT infrastructure, ensuring administrative efficiency and staff commitment, 
promoting scientific collaboration and innovation, and maintaining a diverse 
workforce and culture of equal opportunity in all aspects of SAO's 
employment and business relationships. 

For FY2005, the estimate includes an increase of $634,000 for 
necessary pay for existing staff funded under this line item. 

MEANS AND STRATEGY 

To achieve the goal of Increased Public Engagement, SAO is directing 
its resources to the production and delivery of educational services and 
products that are informed by SAO research about learning and that meet 
the educational needs of SAO's audiences. This sustained outreach effort 
gives SAO increased public coverage and recognition. 

To meet the goal of Strengthened Scientific Research, SAO scientists 
make extensive use of various astronomical facilities to support their 
research, including the ground-based optical and radio telescopes owned and 
operated by SAO located in Arizona and Hawaii, and space-based telescopes 
operated by SAO on behalf of the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration (NASA). These strategies enable SAO scientists to make 



173 



substantial progress in answering fundamental questions on tlie origin and 
nature of the universe and on the fornnation/evolution of Earth and similar 
planets, two of the four science themes on which the Science Commission 
recommended that the Smithsonian concentrate. 

SAO scientists will continue to take a leadership role by participating 
in or hosting national and international conferences (e.g., the American 
Astronomical Society, the International Astronomical Union, the 
Astronomical Data Analysis Software & Systems conference series) and by 
participating as keynote and/or invited speakers at such meetings. SAO 
scientists will also continue to publish in leading peer-reviewed journals such 
as the Astrophysical Journal, the Astronomical Journal, and Astronomy & 
Astrophysics. 

The goal of Enhanced Management Excellence will be addressed by 
making IT infrastructure robust, reliable, and secure; maintaining a 
cooperative environment through communication and activities that 
underscore SAO's special mission and each staff member's contribution to 
its success; evaluating management officials and supervisors on their 
compliance with applicable Equal Opportunity laws, rules, and regulations 
and on their efforts to achieve a diverse workforce; and promoting and 
facilitating the use of small, minority, women-owned, and other underutilized 
businesses in SAO's procurement and business relationships. These 
management tools support and enhance SAO's scientific and educational 
mission. 

STRATEGIC GOALS AND FY 2005 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE GOALS 

Increased Public Engagement 

Develop and bring first-class educational resources to ttie nation 
(5 FTEs and $825,000) 

• Deliver up to 20 educational presentations at national, state, and 
local meetings and conferences that are informed by SAO research 

• Carry out professional development for teachers in conjunction 
with the Annenberg/CPB Channel to reach at least 1 ,000 Channel 
licensees, so as to achieve at least a 10% increase over the 

FY 2003 viewer base of 55 million households and 84,000 schools 

• Obtain at least 48,000 website hits to the Channel workshops 
page per month 

• Present 5 workshops or papers at educational research or 
practitioner conferences, such as those sponsored by the National 
Science Teachers Association 

• Support and evaluate the performance of the traveling exhibition. 
Cosmic Questions: Our Place in Space and Time as it travels 



174 



through various museums across the country. The evaluation 
method currently in use analyzes visitor numbers, visitors' 
feedback, host venue staff feedback, and media reviews 

• Carry out MicroObservatory operations — a telescope network— to 
reach 100 participating schools and take 20,000 images; these 
numbers represent a 50% increase over FY 2003 levels 

Strengthened Scientific Research 

Conduct focused scientific researcfi programs that are recognized 
nationally and internationally (7 15 FTEs and $20,879,000) 

Theme I: The Origin and Nature of the Universe 

• Use the Chandra X-ray Observatory that SAO operates on behalf of 
NASA to continue analyzing the distribution of the mysterious dark 
(i.e., invisible) matter through its gravitational effects as disclosed 
by the x-ray emissions of hot gas associated with galaxy clusters 

• Use new optical instruments on the converted Multiple Mirror 
Telescope (MMT) to continue determination of the large scale 
structure of the universe through the measurement of the 
distribution of galaxies deep in space 

• Continue construction of VERITAS, which will enable in-depth 
studies of the highest energy processes known to exist in the 
universe 

Theme II, The Formation and Evolution of Earth and Similar Planets 

• Use the new submillimeter array (SMA) and new infrared 
instruments on the converted MMT to further work on the studies 
of key observational aspects of star formation such as the 
processes that occur in giant molecular clouds that lead stars to 
form from the material in these clouds 

• Use SAO's array of small telescopes to search for planets around 
other stars via the transit method. Planets discovered by this 
technique can be studied in depth, including determining the 
composition of their atmospheres. This new field will continue to 
lead to a vast increase in knowledge of the properties of the 
planets elsewhere in our galaxy, and broaden and deepen 
understanding of Earth's solar system. 

• Continue cutting-edge theoretical work on the possible means for 
planet formation and dynamical evolution as well as on the 
development of planetary atmospheres 

• Validate and share the knowledge gained from the above research 
by publishing 400 papers in the scientific literature, authored or co- 
authored by SAO scientists, and making 200 presentations at 
professional meetings in FY 2005 



175 



Enhanced Management Excellence 

Modernize the Institution 's information technology systems and 
infrastructure (1 FTE and $375,000) 

• Increase the reliability of SAO's IT infrastructure by continuing the 
migration of an additional 10 Terabytes of core data and services 
to infrastructure that has built-in redundancy 

• Install a firewall at the network border and monitor intrusion 
detection logs to enhance the security of SAO's IT infrastructure 

• Accommodate increased data flow from SAO's scientific 
instruments by increasing the overall online data-storage capacity 
to 75 Terabytes 

Ensure that the Smithsonian 's workforce is efficient, collaborative, 
committed, and innovative (1 FTE and $167,000) 

• Continue to inform staff about SAO research discoveries and 
progress, scientific prizes and awards, Smithsonian directives, and 
internal policies and procedures through quarterly town meetings 
and SAO-wide electronic messages as necessary 

• Encourage innovation by annually securing financial resources for 
internal research and development, and allocating these resources 
through a competitive, peer-reviewed process 

Recruit, hire and retain a diverse workforce and promote equal 
opportunity (2 FTEs and $189,000) 

• Increase candidate pools in order to recruit minorities at 15% of 
total hires and individuals with disabilities at 1 % 

• Continue to provide maximum practicable opportunities in SAO 
purchases to small or disadvantaged businesses, veteran-owned 
small or service-disabled businesses, HUBZone small businesses, 
and women-owned small businesses 



176 



SMITHSONIAN CENTER FOR MATERALS RESEARCH AND 

EDUCATION 





APPLICATION OF OPERATING RESOURCES 


FEDERAL 
APPROPRIATIONS 


GENERAL 
TRUST 


DONOR/SPONSOR 
DESIGNATED 


GOV'T GRANTS 
& CONTRACTS 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FY 2003 
ESTIMATE 


29 


3,438 





73 





126 





42 


FY 2004 
ESTIMATE 


29 


3,542 





15, 





24 





8, 


FY 2005 
ESTIMATE 


29 


3,674 





15, 















STRATEGIC GOALS: INCREASED PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT; STRENGTHENED 

SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH 

Federal Resource Summary by Performance Objective 



Performance 
Objective 


FY 

Fit 


2004 
$000 


FY 
FTE 


2005 
$000 


Ch 
FTE 


lange 
$000 
















Increased Public Engagement: 














Expand a national outreach effort 


5 


749 


5 


774 





25 


Strengthen the high caliber of Smithsonian 
scholarship in support of public programs 


1 


87 


1 


91 





4 


Improve the stewardship of the national collections 


6 


605 


6 


628 





23 


Strengthened Scientific Research: 














Conduct focused scientific research programs that 
are recognized nationally and internationally 


17 


2,101 


17 


2,181 





80 


Total 


29 


3,542 


29 


3,674 





132 



BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT 

The Smithsonian Center for Materials Research and Education 
(SCMRE) is a multidisciplinary center for materials analysis, scientific 
research, and conservation development involving the study and preservation 
of museum objects, collections, and related materials of cultural or scientific 
importance. It serves as a unique resource for scientific and technical 
support to Smithsonian museums as well as to the museum profession at 
large. Its education and outreach programs serve a broad audience that 
includes the general public. 



177 



To achieve the goal of Increased Public Engagement, SCMRE will 
provide education and technical advances for the nation's museunn 
community and interested public. In pursuit of Strengthened Scientific 
Research, SCMRE will focus on the study of materials, technologies, and 
conservation. 

For FY 2005, the estimate includes an increase of $132,000 for 
necessary pay for existing staff funded under this line item. 

MEANS AND STRATEGY 

To achieve the goal of Increased Public Engagement, SCMRE will aim 
its educational program at conservators and other collections care providers 
by offering training courses, workshops, internships, and fellowships, as well 
as distance-learning opportunities. The Center's technical information office 
will continue to serve the museum community, the cultural heritage 
management community, museum studies students, and the general public— 
this last being an audience that is increasingly concerned with the 
preservation of family heirlooms and other artistic and historic collections. 
The technical information office answers direct inquiries and distributes 
general guidelines in printed or electronic format, handling more than 1 ,000 
information requests annually. SCMRE's website will be maintained and 
updated to increase the impact of research and education. SCMRE will offer 
public programs in collaboration with other Smithsonian units and other 
institutions and affiliates on the national and international levels to present 
the results of SCMRE research, to heighten awareness of the problems of 
preserving cultural heritage, and to gain information about the nature and 
scope of problems being encountered. 

The Center will support vigorously the efforts of Smithsonian 
museums to care for the national collections by providing analytical services 
and by increasing technical assistance for conservation and curatorial 
programs. Based on communication and interaction with the Smithsonian 
museum conservation departments as well as on polling, special training 
issues and research projects will be identified. Research will be initiated and 
courses will be developed to address the most urgent preservation needs. 

To achieve the goal of Strengthened Scientific Research, SCMRE will 
continue to study changes in the composition and properties of materials and 
composite objects to improve the understanding of how they deteriorate over 
decades and centuries, and how they are damaged by external or 
environmental factors, especially the effects of temperature, humidity, light, 
and atmosphere. In particular, SCMRE research will emphasize the 



178 



identification of degradation mechanisms to formulate and test effective 
conservation strategies, techniques, and materials to meet them. Research 
will continue into modern and traditional artists' materials and technologies 
as well as traditional and past technologies that are no longer practiced. 
SCMRE researchers will continue study of the life cycles of objects from raw 
materials transformed by culturally-mediated industrial- or craft-based 
processes, through their performance, use, and eventual degradation and 
their curation as artifacts. A special concern of SCMRE research will be the 
preservation of natural history collections, including development of 
improved fluid storage media and protocols for treatment of various classes 
of organisms. The anticipation of continued terrorist actions using biological 
or chemical agents necessitates further research on decontamination of 
sensitive collection materials and museum buildings with the aim of devising 
effective precautionary measures, monitoring methods, and treatments. 

STRATEGIC GOALS AND FY 2005 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE GOALS 

Increased Public Engagement 

Expand a national outreach effort (5 FTEs and $774,000) 

• Add new (30%) and revised (20%) information to the Web and 
respond to more than 900 inquiries 

• Offer 5 workshops and 3 internships/fellowships to conservators 
Strengthen the high caliber of Smithsonian scholarship in support of 
public programs (1 FTE and $91,000) 

• Maintain the current level (100/year) of analyses of modern and 
traditional artists' and artisans' materials, ethnographic artifacts 
and archival and scientific collections 

Improve the stewardship of the national collections (6 FTEs and 
$628,000) 

• Respond to requests for analytical services (more than 500 
analyses) from Smithsonian units 

• Produce 2 surveys to assess conservation issues in Smithsonian 
collections and conduct research projects to address these 
concerns 

Strengthened Scientific Research 

Conduct focused scientific research programs that are recognized 
nationally and internationally (17 FTEs and $2, 181,000) 

Theme III: Discovering and Understanding Life's Diversity 

• Develop and test 2 new protocols for stabilizing natural history 
specimens and their DNA 

Theme IV: The Study of Human Diversity and Culture Change 

• Maintain 4 materials research projects on ancient and modern 
technologies of inorganic objects, e.g. metals, glasses, and 



179 



ceramics 

Test environmental factors that affect artists' materials and other 

materials, and test models that will allow prediction of these 

effects (more than 200 analyses) 

Develop 1 aqueous varnish coating system that will meet expected 

future solvent emission guidelines, and 1 protocol for assessing the 

stability of existing coatings on such objects as musical 

instruments 

Develop 3 protocols for decontamination of objects and buildings 



180 



SMITHSONIAN ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH CENTER 





APPLICATION OF OPERATING RESOURCES 


FEDERAL 
APPROPRIATIONS 


GENERAL 
TRUST 


DONOR/SPONSOR 
DESIGNATED 


GOV'T GRANTS 
& CONTRACTS 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FY2003 
ACTUAL 


42 


3,487 


8 


424 


16 


635 


55 


3.799 


FY 2004 
ESTIMATE 


34 


2,912 


6 


405 


10 


475 


65 


3,799 


FY 2005 
ESTIMATE 


34 


3,017 


6 


397 


10 


250 


65 


3,799 



STRATEGIC GOALS: INCREASED PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT; STRENGTHENED 
SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH; ENHANCED MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE 

Federal Resource Summary by Performance Objective 



Performance 
Objective 


FY 
FTE 


2004 
$000 


FY 
FTE 


2005 
$000 


Ch 
FTE 


ange 
$000 
















Increased Public Engagement: 














Expand a national outreach effort 





12 





12 








Develop and bring first-class educational resources 
to the nation 


1 


63 


1 


64 





1 


Strengthened Scientific Researcli: 














Conduct focused scientific research programs that 
are recognized nationally and internationally 


25 


2,344 


25 


2,434 





90 


Enhanced Management Excellence: 














Strengthen an Institutional culture that is customer- 
centered and results-oriented 


5 


272 


5 


280 





8 


Modernize the Institution's financial management 
systems and functions 


3 


221 


3 


227 





6 


Total 


34 


2,912 


34 


3,017 





105 



BACKGROUND AND CONTENT 

The Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) is dedicated 
to meeting the global challenge for improved stewardship of the biosphere 
through long-term, large-scale analysis of human impact in the coastal zone. 
SERC research has clear relevance to societal needs and issues of 
environmental management and human impact because of its integrative, 



181 



multi-disciplinary approach, further emphasized because 70 percent of the 
world's population resides in the coastal zone. SERC provides answers to 
environmental questions through data, analysis, publications, and expert 
consultation in support of conservation, environmental policy, and 
management of natural resources. 

To achieve the Institution's goal of Increased Public Engagement, 
SERC's public education and outreach program interprets and presents 
SERC's scientific research to diverse public audiences, which include school 
children and science teachers, students and visiting scientists developing 
professional careers in the environmental sciences, and the general public. 
To achieve the goal of Strengthened Scientific Research, SERC utilizes its 
unique site on the shore of Chesapeake Bay and other sites including the 
Smithsonian Marine Science Network to investigate the ecological 
interconnections of aquatic, terrestrial, and atmospheric components of 
complex landscapes, with comparative studies at regional, continental, and 
global scales. To accomplish Enhanced Management Excellence, SERC will 
improve management of its website, update management systems and 
functions, advance construction of its long-term Facilities Master Plan 
through completion of its Visitors' Housing complex, and ensure safety and 
protection of staff, fellows, volunteers, and visitors. 

For FY 2005, the estimate includes an increase of $105,000 for necessary 
pay for existing staff funded under this line item. 

MEANS AND STRATEGY 

To achieve the goal of Increased Public Engagement, SERC will 
enhance its website to provide greater information to the public. On-site 
education will focus on approximately 10,000 students and increasing 
minority participation. Two teacher-training workshops that are partnerships 
with other Smithsonian units will be undertaken. SERC will expand its highly 
successful distance learning programs (1.2 million participants in FY 2004) 
and develop and implement three regional and national programs. SERC 
outreach also includes lecture series, workshops, and expert consultation for 
the public, teachers, natural resource managers, and public officials. To train 
the next generation of environmental scientists and managers, SERC 
conducts a nationally recognized professional training program for university 
interns, graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and visiting scientists, with 
a particular focus on developing careers of underrepresented minorities. 

To meet the goal of Strengthened Scientific Research, SERC will use 
its invaluable 2,700-acre site on the Chesapeake Bay, where its scientists 
investigate the interconnections of aquatic, terrestrial, and atmospheric 



182 



components of complex landscapes. SERC develops innovative approaches 
and instrumentation to measure environmental change in four ecological 
levels: global change, landscape ecology, ecology of coastal ecosystems, 
and population and community ecology, and has developed unique long-term 
and experimental datasets on environmental change. SERC is also a 
participant in the development of the Smithsonian's unique Marine Science 
Network of sites along the western Atlantic Ocean for comparative coastal 
studies, and in the use of Smithsonian long-term field stations to assess 
ecological patterns and processes. Over its 38-year history, SERC has built a 
reputation for world-class research, producing many articles that are rich in 
data and multi-disciplinary and integrative in analysis. 

Building on existing strengths and unique programs, SERC seeks to 
enhance its highly successful ongoing research on the following topics: land- 
sea linkages of ecosystems, landscape ecology of coastal watersheds, 
estuarine ecology, invasive species (especially in coastal ecosystems), global 
change impacts on biotic and chemical interactions, biocomplexity of 
structure and processes in key ecosystems, and community and population 
ecology. Over the next five years, SERC research on coastal marine ecology 
will focus on four key, interrelated areas: the structure and dynamics of 
marine food webs, the integrity and biodiversity of crucial marine 
ecosystems, linkages of ecosystems at the land-sea interface, and ecological 
regulation of marine biodiversity. SERC seeks to expand its expertise in the 
ecology of invasive species, which impacts coastal ecosystems. To 
implement these goals, SERC will link its research with national and 
international research networks and enhance the Marine Science Network. 
SERC is also developing scientific and technological capabilities in analytical 
chemistry, remote sensing, and instrumentation. 

To address the goal of Enhanced Management Excellence, SERC will 
update its strategic plan and further link it to the emerging Institution-wide 
Science Plan. SERC is improving its management of research by developing 
improved management tools for its overhead activities and structuring tighter 
oversight on its website activities. SERC will ensure safety and protection of 
volunteers, staff, and visitors by sustaining its excellent program of 
supervised inspections and staff involvement. 

STRATEGIC GOALS AND FY 2005 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE GOALS 

Increased Public Engagement 

Expand a national outreach effort (0 FTE's and 12,000) 

• Enhance SERC's website to provide greater information to the public 



183 



• Evaluate the navigational structure and ease of use of the new website 
and refine the site to readily deliver the most useful information for 
intended audiences 

• Increase and enhance the content provided on the site through regular 
(minimum monthly) updates to the homepage for public and media 
audiences in the form of dynamic, engaging current stories that describe 
SERC's scientific projects, results, and impacts. Incorporate these stories 
into laboratory subpages to provide them with dynamic content for a 
public audience 

• Improve and increase SERC staff ability to update site content directly 

• Increase underrepresented minorities including African American, Latino, 
and Asian communities in training programs, on-site visits, and distance 
learning programs to 30% participation, in order to increase diversity of 
audiences served in the Washington DC area 

Develop and bring first-class educational resources to the nation (1 FTE and 
64,000) 

• Evaluate and then enhance the quality of on-site environmental education 
programs offered to schoolchildren, teachers, professional scientists, 
natural resource managers, and the general public in order to better 
represent current research findings and field methods used by 
Smithsonian scientists 

• Develop and implement two teacher-training workshops that are the 
outcome of partnerships with other Smithsonian units in order to increase 
quality of content and collaboration between units 

• Develop and implement three regional and national distance-learning 
programs in order to interpret SERC's environmental research for 
students, teachers, and the general public 

Strengthened Scientific Research 

Conduct focused scientific research programs that are recognized 
nationally and internationally (25 FTEs and $2,344,000) 

Theme III: Discovering and Understanding Life's Diversity 

• increase knowledge of human impacts in coastal ecosystems and 
ecological change in land-sea interactions by developing SERC's 
unique long-term and experimental studies, field sampling, 
laboratory analyses, and data records in seven areas (species 
composition and population dynamics, estuarine water quality, flow 
of nutrients, invasive species, atmospheric increase in CO^, 
ultraviolet radiation, and biocomplexity of mangrove forest 
ecosystems) 

• Enhance highly successful environmental research by sustaining 
awards of competitive external grants and contracts from a diverse 
array of at least 1 2 agencies and other sources at approximate 
level of $2.5-3.0 million per year on land-sea linkages, landscape 



184 



ecology, invasive species, global change, biocomplexity, 
community and population ecology, and coastal marine and 
estuarine ecology 

• Disseminate results of research on human impacts in coastal 
ecosystems and ecological change by publishing 50-70 articles in 
peer-reviewed journals and books based on SERC's original 
environmental research 

• Continue to link and coordinate SERC research through active 
participation in the Smithsonian Marine Science Network, with 
national and international research networks (such as the National 
Association of Marine Laboratories, and Association of Ecosystem 
Research Centers), and with governmental agencies such as U.S. 
Coast Guard, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and NOAA 

• Provide advice and counsel to state and national legislatures on 
SERC's environmental expertise 

• Train the next generation of ecologists and environmental scientists 
and natural resource managers by sustaining SERC's high-quality 
professional training program, and awarding 40 undergraduate 
internships, supporting 10 graduate students, and 5 postdoctoral 
scientists, with emphasis on underrepresented minorities to achieve 
approximately 25% minority participation 

Enhanced Management Excellence 

Strengthen an Institutional culture that is customer-centered and results- 
oriented (5 FTE's and 280,000) 

• Implement SERC's revised Strategic Plan and link to Institution-wide 
science planning process 

• Develop improved tracking systems for external grants and contracts to 
improve efficiency and effectiveness 

• Develop greater safeguards and oversight for SERC website to assure 
appropriate, up-to-date content 

Modernize the Institution's financial management systems and functions 
(3 FTE's and 227,000} 

• Ensure appropriate staff training on future modules of the Institution's 
Enterprise Resource Planning system 

• Improve laboratory safety procedures to ensure a safe work environment 

• Work with OFEO on facilities improvement to meet SERC's programmatic 
goals for research and education 



185 



SMITHSONIAN TROPICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE 





APPLICATION OF OPERATING RESOURCES 


FEDERAL 
APPROPRIATIONS 


GENERAL 
TRUST 


DONOR/SPONSOR 
DESIGNATED 


GOV'T GRANTS 
& CONTRACTS 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FY 2003 
ESTIMATE 


242 


11,454 


12 


967 


25 


4,370 


13 


1,400 


FY 2004 
ESTIMATE 


242 


11,280 


12 


843 


24 


3,091 


12 


1,306 


FY 2005 
ESTIMATE 


242 


11,607 


12 


801 


21 


2,468 


12 


1,300 



STRATEGIC GOALS: INCREASED PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT; STRENGTHENED 
SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH; ENHANCED MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE 

Federal Resource Summary by Performance Objective 



Performance 
Objective 


FY 
FTE 


2004 
$000 


FY 

FTE 


2005 
$000 


CI- 
FTE 


lange 
$000 
















Increased Public Engagement: 














Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and other 
public programs 


4 


142 


4 


147 





5 


Expand a national outreach effort 


3 


94 


3 


96 





2 


Strengthened Scientific Research: 














Strengthen capacity in science research 


23 


1,220 


23 


1,256 





36 


Conduct focused scientific research programs that 
are recognized nationally and internationally 


93 


4,875 


92 


5,017 


-1 


142 


Enhanced Management Excellence: 














Strengthen an Institutional culture that is customer- 
centered and results-oriented 


90 


3,984 


91 


4,098 


1 


114 


Modernize the Institution's information technology 
systems and infrastructure 


4 


185 


4 


190 





5 


Ensure safety and protection of Smithsonian 
facilities, national collections, staff, visitors, and 
volunteers 


25 


780 


25 


803 





23 


Total 


242 


1 1 ,280 


242 


11,607 





327 



BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT 

The mission of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STR!) is to 
increase understanding of the past, present, and future of tropical 



186 



biodiversity, and its relevance to human welfare. With this aim, STRI 
scientists conduct and disseminate long-term, innovative research that 
explains the origins of life in the tropics, how it is currently maintained, and 
how humans have affected it throughout time. STRI serves the international 
scientific community by maintaining world-class facilities for tropical studies, 
most of these in the Republic of Panama where it serves as official custodian 
for the Barro Colorado Nature Monument, which has been continually studied 
for 80 years and is the only mainland tropical reserve under U.S. 
stewardship. The Institute also provides essential training and experience to 
students and professionals to strengthen future capacity in tropical research. 

STRI will address the goal of Strengthened Scientific Research by 
maintaining the productivity of its permanent scientific staff, increasing the 
number of research fellowships and graduate courses, and promoting 
collaborations with visiting scientists and academic and scientific 
institutions. To achieve the goal of Increased Public Engagement, the 
Institute will strengthen its public programs highlighting the research process 
and results, and increase dissemination of its work through the Web and 
other media. The goal of Enhanced Management Excellence will be 
addressed by devoting resources to strengthening the security of research 
facilities and continuing to upgrade infrastructure to ensure the personal 
safety of all users. 

The FY 2005 budget estimate includes a net increase of $327,000 for 
necessary pay for existing staff funded under this line item. 

MEANS AND STRATEGY 

The Institutional goal of Increased Public Engagement will be 
addressed by offering high-quality public programs that increase our 
understanding of life in the tropics and its relevance to global processes. 
STRI scientists are providing the conceptual base and natural history content 
to be used in the exhibitions in Panama's new Biodiversity Museum, a 
Smithsonian-affiliated museum designed by architect Frank O. Gehry, and 
scheduled to open to international audiences in March 2006. 

To meet its principal goal of maintaining its leadership in tropical 
research, STRI provides basic support for its staff scientists to conduct 
projects that will increase our knowledge about tropical environments. In 
FY 2004, STRI put in place a program that will produce new knowledge 
about tropical soils, a poorly studied component of tropical systems. This 
new initiative, which aims to fill a critical gap in our knowledge of tropical 
forests and their influence on the carbon cycle, has resulted in the hiring of a 
soil microbiologist, establishment of a modern soils laboratory, and funding 



187 



of a competitive postdoctoral fellowship program. Through an interagency 
agreement, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has detailed to STRI one of 
their hydrologists involved with long-term studies on tropical soils to 
strengthen this effort. 

Most projects done at STRI have a geographic component, on a 
variety of scales, from projects studying forest dynamics in 50-hectare plots 
to studies of coral reefs, mangroves, and seagrasses in the marine realm. 
Along with other Smithsonian research centers, STRI has lagged behind in 
using information technology to integrate data resulting from its research. An 
initiative in FY 2005 will enable STRI to implement Geographic Information 
Systems (GIS) to integrate data from projects conducted in specific 
geographical locations such as Barro Colorado Island or Bocas del Toro, the 
site of STRI's new Caribbean laboratory, and pantropical studies such as 
those conducted by its Center for Tropical Forest Science. 

STRI scientists consider the training of the next generation of tropical 
researchers to be one of their primary responsibilities. The strengthening of 
central support for fellowships will enable STRI to increase its support of 
aspiring scientists, junior scientists, and graduate students, who have 
demonstrated potential for careers In its research fields. Through institutional 
collaborations with universities and other institutions such as the 
Organization for Tropical Studies, STRI will provide graduate students with 
hands-on experience that can mark their future scientific careers. 

To address the goal of Enhanced Management Excellence, STRI will 
continue to ensure that it provides world-class facilities for its scientific staff 
and visitors. A major effort in FY 2005 will be implementing safety and 
security plans to ensure the protection of employees and visitors. 

STRATEGIC GOALS AND FY 2005 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE GOALS 

Increased Public Engagement 

Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and other public programs 
(4 FTEs and $147,000) 

• Increase public awareness of the natural history of the tropics by 
providing content and guidance for five galleries in Panama's new 
Biodiversity Museum, scheduled to open in 2006 

• Expand public understanding of both the diversity of natural 
tropical environments and the scientific methods used in their 
study and through high-quality public programs at three sites, 
offering visitors a firsthand experience 

• Engage lay audiences with STRI research through a monthly public 
lecture series and at least one book targeted to them 



188 



Expand a national outreach effort (3 FTEs and $96,000) 

• Increase public awareness on tropical biodiversity and ongoing 
research projects using a dynamic and weekly updated webpage 
targeted to meet client information needs for a diverse worldwide 
audience 

• Encourage collaborative research projects between resident staff 
and visiting scientists and students by offering accurate and up-to- 
date information on STRI facilities on the website 

• Share results from major research developments with media and 
the public by holding at least 4 press conferences 

Strengthened Scientific Research 

Strengthen capacity in science research (23 FTEs and $1,256,000) 

• Contribute to the next generation of tropical scientists by training a 
minimum of 1 5 pre- and 5 postdoctoral researchers in STRI 
research disciplines 

• Increase scientific capacity for studying the tropics by offering at 
least six courses at the undergraduate and graduate levels in 
tropical biodiversity in partnership with academic institutions such 
as Princeton and McGill Universities and the Organization of 
Tropical Studies 

• Increase STRI research capacity by preparing and submitting joint 
proposals with visiting scientists and institutions to potential 
donors and agencies (federal and non-federal) 

Conduct focused scientific research programs that are recognized 
nationally and internationally (92 FTEs and $5,017,000) 
Theme III: Discovering and Understanding Life's Diversity 

• Provide relevant, new knowledge on tropical ecosystems and their 
relation to human welfare by investigating the past, present, and 
future of tropical biodiversity through research in behavioral 
ecology, molecular evolution, forest ecology, plant physiology, 
canopy biology, paleoecology, and archeobiology 

• Foster through an interagency agreement with the USGS an 
innovative and pioneering soils research program in order to bring 
to the forefront scientific understanding of the processes that 
support tropical ecosystems 

• Increase understanding of marine environments, their diversity, 
threats, and conservation needs and opportunities in the tropical 
eastern Pacific and Caribbean, within the framework of the Marine 
Science Network 

• Share research results with the scientific community worldwide by 
publishing at least 80 scientific papers in peer-reviewed journals 



189 



• Offer scientists the opportunity to test research hypotheses by 
nnaintaining long-term forests dynamics plots network in 14 
countries throughout Africa, Asia, and Latin America 

• Facilitate tropical research for at least 500 visiting scientists and 
students working in STRI facilities, including projects funded by the 
National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health 

• Increase understanding of spatial and temporal dimensions of 
biological elements and variables by strengthening STRI's capacity 
to produce integrative GIS analyses 

• Promote collaboration with other Smithsonian research units by 
providing incentives for comparative biodiversity projects with a 
tropical component 

Enhanced Management Excellence 

Strengthen an Institutional culture that is customer-centered and 
results-oriented (91 FTEs and $4,098,000) 

• Increase internal customer satisfaction (STRI staff and visitors) and 
administrative efficiency and streamline procedures by using the 
ERP system for financial, budget, procurement, and human 
resources management 

• Increase efficiency of the registration process for visiting scientists 
and students by offering a timesaving online application and 
registration system 

Modernize the Institution's information technology systems and 
infrastructure (4 FTEs and $190,000) 

• Increase information sharing within the Institution by improved 
connectivity within and between STRI facilities through the local 
area network system 

• Increase efficiency of administrative procedures by promoting 
timesaving and error-reducing practices such as online transactions 
via the STRI Intranet 

• Strengthen STRI's capacity to analyze tropical biodiversity from a 
spatial and temporal perspective by setting up at least four fully 
operational GIS workstations 

Ensure safety and protection of Smithsonian facilities, national 
collections, staff, visitors, and volunteers (25 FTEs and $803,000) 

• Increase staff involvement in response to the emergency 
preparedness plan by offering training courses at five STRI facilities 

• Bring all STRI facilities into compliance with security standards in 
order to ensure the safety and protection of staff, visitors, and 
volunteers as well as collections, infrastructure, and equipment 



190 



OUTREACH 





APPLICATION OF OPERATING RESOURCES 


FEDERAL 
APPROPRIATIONS 


GENERAL 
TRUST 


DONOR/SPONSOR 
DESIGNATED 


GOV'T GRANTS 
& CONTRACTS 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FY 2003 
ESTIMATE 


88 


8,329 


57 


4,715 


11 


3,661 


8 


1,341 


Pi' 2004 
ESTIMATE 


89 


9,393 


57 


4,788 


10 


3,166 


8 


1,373 


FY 2005 
ESTIMATE 


90 


10,453 


58 


4,474 


10 


2,660 


8 


1,360 



STRATEGIC GOALS: INCREASED PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT; STRENGTHENED 
SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH; ENHANCED MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE 

Federal Resource Summary by Performance Objective 



Petiormance 
Objective 


FY 
FTE 


2004 
$000 


FY 
FTE 


2005 
$000 


FTE 


lange 
$000 


Increased Public Engagement: 














Expand a national outreach effort 


45 


4,582 


45 


4,704 





122 


Develop and bring first-class educational resources 
to the nation 


33 


3,163 


33 


3,258 





95 


Strengthened Scientific Research: 














Strengthen capacity in science research 





882 





1,637 





755 


Develop the intellectual component of the 
collections by performing collections-based studies 


4 


327 


4 


351 





24 


Enhanced Management Excellence: 














Strengthen an Institutional culture that is customer- 
centered and results-oriented. 


2 


156 


2 


162 





6 


Modernize the Institution's financial management 
systems and functions 


5 


283 


6 


341 


1 


58 


Total 


89 


9,393 


90 


10,453 


1 


1,060 



BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT 

Through a coordinated national outreach program, the Institution 
expands the presence of the Smithsonian Institution across the nation and 
exposes the entire country to the rich heritage of the American people. The 
Smithsonian's outreach activities support community-based cultural and 
educational organizations around the country; ensure a vital, recurring, and 



191 



high-impact Smithsonian presence in all 50 states through the provision of 
traveling exhibitions and a network of affiliations; increase connections 
between the Institution and targeted audiences (African American, Asian 
American, Latino, Native American, and new American); provide kindergarten 
through college-age museum education and outreach opportunities; enhance 
K-12 science education programs; facilitate the Smithsonian's scholarly 
interactions with students and scholars at universities, museums, and other 
research institutions; and publish and disseminate books related to the 
research and collections strengths of the Institution. 

This line item includes the programs under the Office of National 
Programs that provide the critical mass of Smithsonian outreach activity: the 
Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES), the Smithsonian 
Center for Education and Museum Studies (SCEMS), and Smithsonian 
Affiliations. The Smithsonian Associates (TSA), which receives no federal 
funding, is also part of this national outreach effort. This line item also 
includes the National Science Resources Center (NSRC), Office of 
Fellowships (OF), and Smithsonian Institution Press (SIP). 

For FY 2005, the estimate includes an increase of $800,000 and 
1 FTE for the fellowships and scholarly research awards programs, and an 
increase of $260,000 for necessary pay for existing staff funded under this 
line item. 

MEANS AND STRATEGY 

To help achieve the Institution's goals, the units under this line item 
will direct resources to the following activities: 

Smithsonian Traveling Exiiibition Service - To achieve the goal of 
Increased Public Engagement, SITES is directing its resources to develop 
Smithsonian Across America: A Celebration of National Pride. This mobile 
museum will feature Smithsonian artifacts from the most iconic (presidential 
portraits, historic American flags. Civil War records, early automobiles, the 
Edison light bulb, inaugural gowns, and astronaut uniforms) to the simplest 
items of everyday life (family quilts, prairie schoolhouse furnishings, historic 
lunch boxes, multi-lingual storefront and street signs). A mobile museum 
exhibit can visit up to three venues per week in the course of a year, 
increasing by 1 50 the number of outreach locations to which SITES shows 
can travel annually. In addition, a mobile museum is able to frequent 
locations where people live, work, and recreate. By establishing an exhibit 
presence in settings like these, SITES will not only increase its annual visitor 
participation by 1 million, but also advance a key Smithsonian performance 



192 



objective: to develop exhibit approaches that address underserved audiences 
and populations not always affiliated with mainstream cultural institutions. 

The Smithsonian's commitment to public engagement and 
underserved audiences is strengthened by SITES' Museum on Main Street 
(MoMS) program, which circulates exhibitions to rural communities across 
the country. In FY 2005, an exhibit about America's diverse musical 
traditions will join six MoMS shows already on the road, increasing from 33 
to 43 the number of states included in the program and adding 26 small 
towns to the 410 that will have hosted a MoMS exhibition so far. 

Ensuring a vital Smithsonian exhibit presence nationally at a time 
when the fiscal stability of community cultural institutions is extremely 
unpredictable challenges SITES in FY 2005 to deliver to its 10,000-museum 
client base high-quality programs at affordable costs. To that end, SITES will 
reconfigure six large-scale installations into more manageable, less costly 
exhibit presentations. SITES also will partner with national, state, and local 
organizations to leverage their own programmatic assets and visibility. 

In partnership with ten science centers and planetariums across the 
country, SITES will tour Exploring the Universe, a presentation of the 
National Air and Space Museum's Exploring the Universe gallery. To meet 
the demand among smaller history and African American museums for an 
exhibition commemorating the Brown vs. Board of Education ruling, SITES 
will extend throughout FY 2005 its panel version tour of the National 
Museum of American History's exhibition on that subject. An exhibition on 
Roberto Clemente will be recreated from a critically acclaimed, large-scale art 
installation in Puerto Rico. SITES' exhibition will be supplemented by 
artifacts partnerships with national Hispanic organizations. Our Journeys, 
Our Stories is about the contributions of 1 00 Latino leaders who have 
influenced every sphere of American life. The affordability of the show 
guarantees that Latino cultural centers will participate in the tour as actively 
as mainstream art museums. The National Building Museum and National 
Park Service are the partnering entities for two other exhibitions in SITES' 
FY 2005 program: Do It Yourself: The How-To of Home Improvement and 
Spanning Engineering Culture and America's Historic Covered Bridges. 
Several exhibit tours will be extended by popular demand. The most 
important of them is The American Presidency, whose original itinerary could 
not accommodate multiple exhibitor requests. 

Smithsonian Affiliations - The mission of Smithsonian Affiliations is to 
build a strong, national network of museums in the United States in order to 
establish strong, vital relationships with communities throughout the 
country. By working with both emerging and well-established museums of 



193 



diverse subject areas and scholarly disciplines, Smithsonian Affiliations is 
building a partnership of museums through which audiences and visitors 
everywhere will be able to share in the great wealth of the Smithsonian 
while building capacity and expertise in local museum professionals. 

Pilot educational programs will be developed over the next two years 
with the objective of fostering ongoing collaborative opportunities in the 
future. Coupled with this effort is a pilot program which will explore new 
museum volunteer opportunities for professionals in every walk of life. 

Smithsonian Center for Education and IVIuseum Studies - SCEMS 
learning experiences include publications, websites, professional 
development, and internships. In FY 2005, SCEMS will produce websites 
and publications that meet learning and professional standards and 
disseminate them broadly. SCEMS will produce the centra! Smithsonian 
education website ( www.SmithsonianEducation.org ) for educators, families 
and students to reach a projected audience of 3.5 million visitors. The 
central website is designed to increase access to all Smithsonian education 
websites, publications, field trips, professional development, lesson plans, 
interactive activities and products. SCEMS will publish and distribute to all 
elementary and middle schools in the United States a teacher magazine with 
content based on Smithsonian research and collections and lesson plans 
aligned with national standards, reaching 82,000 schools. To support all of 
SCEMS learning experiences, professional development opportunities will be 
offered to educators and museum professionals in Washington DC, at 
Smithsonian Affiliate sites, and through distance learning, with a projected 
total audience of 1 million. SCEMS will manage the Institution's internship 
program, providing authentic learning experiences for 600 college students. 
The purpose of all of these efforts is to improve teaching and learning by 
providing authoritative, relevant, and inspiring resources to the nation. 

To identify audience needs, create content, and extend the 
Smithsonian's reach, SCEMS will forge external partnerships with national 
education and museum organizations. The Center will sustain ongoing 
partnerships with the U.S. Department of Education, the American 
Association of Museums, the College Board, the National Writing Project, the 
International Literacy Network, the National Association of Elementary 
School Principals, and membership organizations for teachers of history, art, 
and science. SCEMS will provide leadership for internal collaborations 
including the Smithsonian Council of Education Directors, Smithsonian 
Heritage Steering Committee, and Smithsonian Internship Council. SCEMS 
will survey these partners to monitor and improve its effectiveness as a 
leader in museum education. 



194 



SCEMS is committed to researching the role, value, and impact of 
museum education through in-depth case study. In 2005, SCEMS will 
analyze and publish the results of a three-year pan-Institutional evaluation of 
the impact of a teacher professional development program to improve the 
teaching of American history. The study will address how the program 
changed teacher content knowledge, attitudes towards teaching history, 
methods of teaching history, and understanding of the historical process. 
The results will be shared with all Smithsonian offices for the purpose of 
improving the quality of Smithsonian teacher training. 

Smithsonian Institution Press - SIP will use its federal resources to 
widen the public impact of its publications by releasing publications that 
support first-class science as well as those that appeal to mass readers. 

Office of Fellowships - To achieve the Institution's goal of 
Strengthened Scientific Research, OF will increase the number of fellowships 
and grants offered through the Smithsonian Fellowship Program and 
Scholarly Studies Program. Those programs, which infuse the Smithsonian 
with new ideas and approaches to research, are crucial to the intellectual 
health and continued advancement of the Institution. This is the number one 
priority in the Science Commission's report. 

To meet the goal of Enhanced Management Excellence, the Office of 
Fellowships will increase its effectiveness in attracting the best applicants to 
the fellowship program. Targeted recruitment and marketing strategies will 
be employed to attract skilled candidates for research and scholarly priorities. 
All application materials, deadlines, notifications, and financial management 
systems will be reviewed to ensure compliance with federal procedures and 
regulations. Working with Smithsonian units, an analysis of existing review 
panels/committees, evaluation procedures, and ranking of applications and 
proposals will be undertaken. 

National Science Resources Center - NSRC will strive to increase the 
number of ethnically diverse students participating in effective science 
programs based on NSRC products and services. The center will develop and 
implement a national outreach strategy that will increase the number of 
school districts that are implementing NSRC K-8 programs. 

STRATEGIC GOALS AND FY 2005 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE GOALS 

Increased Public Engagement 

Expand a national outreach effort (45 FTEs and $4,704,000) 

• Develop one multi-year national tour of a mobile museum exhibit to 
increase by 1 50 the number of outreach locations to which SITES 



195 



shows can travel and by 1 million the number of visitors to the 
exhibitions 

• Complete and launch one multi-year, national tour for rural 
communities of an exhibit about American musical traditions, to 
increase by 26 small towns and 10 states the number of locations 
that participate in the MoMS program 

• Retrofit MoMS music exhibit and book the show in a minimum of 
6 high-traffic, general public settings, such as schools, state fair 
pavilions, public festivals, conventions, civic commemorations, and 
mixed-used shopping mall and transportation terminals, to increase 
the involvement of large and diverse population groups in 
Smithsonian exhibit programs 

• Complete and launch multi-year, national tours of Roberto 
Clemente, Our Journeys, Our Stories, and Brown vs. Board of 
Education to address the subject matter interests and museum 
communities of culturally diverse audiences 

• Partner with a minimum of 5 Smithsonian units and 5 outside 
organizations/associations to produce and circulate 6 alternative 
format versions of expensive, large-scale installations to maintain 
high-quality program offerings at affordable prices 

• Enact a minimum of 3 measures to increase SITES' revenue stream 
through consultant services, extended exhibit tours, and on-line 
exhibit bookings to reduce as fully as possible the rental fee burden 
on exhibitors in the field 

• Expand the Smithsonian Affiliations network into an additional 1 1 
states and some additional targeted regions, thereby creating a 
local Smithsonian presence in every state and in most major 
communities in the country 

Develop and bring first-class educational resources to the nation 
(33 FTEs and $3,258,000) 

• Produce and publish a teacher magazine based on Smithsonian 
research collections and distribute to schools in all 50 states, 
reaching 82,000 schools 

• Produce and manage www.SmithsonianEducation.org , a central 
education website for educators, families, and students, to achieve 
3,500,000 visitors in 2005 

• Train 1 ,000,000 educators and museum professionals through 
workshops offered in Washington DC, and via distance learning 

• Manage the Smithsonian internship program, providing 600 college 
students with placements, training, and enrichment opportunities 

• Publish 50 new titles a year that are well-written by the best 
authors and experts in disciplines that reflect institutional interests 
and strengths aimed at three distinct market groups; academic, 
general readership, and youth 



196 



• Increase the number of ethnically diverse students participating in 
effective science programs based on NSRC products and services 

• Develop and implement a national outreach strategy that will 
increase the number of school districts that are implementing NSRC 
K-8 programs by 1 00% 

Strengthened Scientific Research 

Strengthen capacity in science researc/i (0 FTEs and $1,637,000) 

• Award 20 additional meritorious fellowship and grant awards 
Develop tfie intellectual component of the collections by performing 
collections-based studies (4 FTEs and $351,000) 

• Publish in print a minimum of 10 publications a year in the 
Contributions and Studies Series Program which report on the 
scientific, technical, and historical research conducted by 
Smithsonian staff and their professional colleagues, as well as on 
the collections of the various Smithsonian museums 

• Expand the reach of these studies by making available on the 
Smithsonian Institution Press website all of the abstracts in the 
program, and one of the nine series 

Enhanced Management Excellence 

Strengthen an Institutional culture that is customer-centered and 
results-oriented (2 FTEs and $162,000) 

• Conduct satisfaction surveys of internal and external partnerships, 
analyze results, and address performance deficiencies 

• Complete a three-year outcomes-based evaluation of a major pan- 
Institutional program to improve the teaching of U.S. history, 
analyze results, and address performance deficiencies 

• Ensure that Affiliates needs are met in conformance with 
Institutional policy, by establishing a working methodology that is 
customer-friendly and results in the collection of accurate data 

Modernize the Institution's financial management systems and 
functions (6 FTEs and $341,000) 

• Review current policies and procedures to improve efficient and 
effective programmatic and financial management of fellowships, 
grants and other academic appointments throughout the Institution 

• Analyze data on Fellowship Alumni to provide an effective 
mechanism to increase communications, feedback, distribution of 
news about the Smithsonian, newsletters, and conferences 

FY 2005 REQUEST -EXPLANATION OF CHANGE 

The FY 2005 budget estimate includes a net increase of $1,060,000 
and 1 FTE. Included are an increase of $260,000 for necessary pay for 



197 



existing staff and a program Increase of an office assistant and $800,000 to 
support the Institution's fellowship and grant programs of research. The 
office assistant position will support the additional administrative functions 
such as travel of review panels, scheduling review meetings, responding to 
programmatic questions, and other administrative issues as a result of the 
increase to these programs. Adding multi-year postdoctoral fellowships and 
increasing the support for internal research grants are essential. Much of 
today's cutting-edge scientific research (e.g. molecular studies) often 
demands more than a single year of funding to gather and analyze the data 
and prepare the final product. Restoring support for both programs will 
continue to promote projects that are highly innovative, increase 
collaboration with other research institutions, and result in publications and 
exhibitions. 

If the FY 2005 request is not allowed, the Office of Fellowships will 
not be able to continue to support the quality and quantity of research at the 
Smithsonian. The competitive edge to attract the best scholars and students 
will no longer exist. Without the training of the next generation of scholars 
and the collaboration with scientists and scholars from around the world, the 
Smithsonian's status as one of the leading research institutions in the world 
will be diminished. 



198 



COMMUNICATIONS 





APPLICATION OF OPERATING RESOURCES 


FEDERAL 
APPROPRIATIONS 


GENERAL 
TRUST 


DONOR/SPONSOR 
DESIGNATED 


GOV'T GRANTS 
& CONTRACTS 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FY 2003 
ESTIMATE 


15 


1,347 


22 


2,379 














FY 2004 
ESTIMATE 


15 


1,386 


22 


2,242 














FY 2005 
ESTIMATE 


19 


1,900 


22 


2,242 















STRATEGIC GOALS: INCREASED PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT; STRENGTHENED 
SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH; ENHANCED MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE 

Federal Resource Summary by Performance Objective 



Performance 
Objective 


FY 
FTE 


2004 
$000 


FY 
FTE 


2005 
$000 


FTE 


lange 
$000 
















Increased Public Engagement: 














Expand a national outreach effort 


4 


431 


7 


672 


3 


241 


Deliver the highest quality visitor services 


5 


431 


5 


439 





8 


Strengthened Scientific Research: 














Conduct focused scientific research programs that 
are recognized nationally and internationally 


1 


48 


1 


50 





2 


Enhanced Management Excellence: 














Strengthen an Institutional culture that is customer- 
centered and results-oriented. 








1 


249 


1 


249 


Enhance the reputation of the Smithsonian by 
maintaining good relations with the news media 
and with federal, state, and^ local governments. 


5 


476 


5 


490 





14 


Total 


15 


1,386 


19 


1,900 


4 


514 



BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT 

The Office of Communications includes two offices: the Office of 
Public Affairs (OPA) and the Visitor Information and Associates' Reception 
Center (VIARC). OPA coordinates public relations and communications in 
conjunction with museums, research centers, and offices to help ensure a 
consistent and positive image for the Institution. The office develops 



199 



programs to advance the Institution's objectives and acquaints the public 
with research, exhibitions, public progranns, and other activities of the 
Smithsonian by working with the news media and by issuing materials for 
staff and the public. 

The Visitor Information and Associates' Reception Center seeks both 
to broaden the public's knowledge, appreciation, and enjoyment of the 
Smithsonian and to facilitate and promote participation in its programs and 
activities. VIARC advances the goal of Strengthened Scientific Research 
through the provision of behind-the-scenes volunteers who assist staff in 
performing their research. 

For FY 2005, the estimate includes an increase of 4 FTEs and 
$476,000 for a Web content program and $38,000 for necessary pay for 
existing staff funded under this line item. 

MEANS AND STRATEGY 

To achieve the goal of Increased Public Engagement, the Office of 
Public Affairs is directing its resources to nationwide mass-media publicity 
and to expanding relationships with minority communities through targeted 
radio and print advertising and publication of visitors' brochures and a 
newsletter devoted to scientific research. OPA publishes a monthly 
newspaper and a biweekly newsletter for employees to keep them informed 
about other Smithsonian staff and their projects. OPA's Web Content Unit 
extends the Smithsonian's communication messages to the World Wide Web 
by overseeing content on the central website and working with units across 
the Institution to establish and maintain guidelines and standards. VIARC 
also advances this goal by disseminating information on public programs, 
exhibitions, events, and collections. This is accomplished through content 
responsibility for four segments of the Smithsonian website (Visitor 
Information, Events, Exhibits, and Encyclopedia Smithsonian); seven-day 
year-round operation of the Smithsonian Information Center; recruitment, 
training, scheduling, and supervision of volunteer and staff information 
specialists at museum information desks; operation of public inquiry mail and 
telephone information services; and outreach to the local, national, and 
international tour and travel industry. 

VIARC advances the goal of Strengthened Scientific Research through 
the Behind-the-Scenes volunteer program, which assists staff in performing 
their research. Volunteer assignments range from clerical tasks to highly 
complex research, conservation, and technical work. 



200 



To meet the goal of Enhanced Management Excellence, the Office of 
Communications responds to all media inquiries in a timely manner with 
accurate, concise information and initiates story ideas to the media about 
Smithsonian exhibitions, research, and programs. 

STRATEGIC GOALS AND FY 2005 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE GOALS 

Increased Public Engagement 

Expand a national outreach effort (7 FTEs and $672,000) 

• Increase by 1 0% an outreach campaign to target traditionally 
underserved audiences, including radio stations (in English and 
Spanish), weekly newspapers that serve these communities, 
alternative weeklies, posters, and newsletters 

• Through the Web Content Unit, develop a plan for collecting, 
analyzing, and reporting use and evaluations of the central website, 
and general measures of Institution-wide Web use, to improve Web 
programming 

• Increase links to and between Smithsonian units' sites by 15%, 
and increase the number of website visitor sessions to the central 
site by 20% 

• Redesign the central Smithsonian website to create a lively, 
exciting, and unified Web presence that is responsive to visitor 
needs and interests and extends the reach of the current Web 
presence 

• Design and implement Web content to better serve the Web- 
visiting public, making it easier to plan visits to museums, learn 
about Smithsonian resources, and become involved with the 
Institution 

Deliver the highest quality visitor services (5 FTEs and $439,000) 

• Continue to provide accurate and timely information on events, 
activities, and exhibitions through 14 information desks and the 
Telephone Information desk 

• Update visitor information at least once daily 

• Recruit 1 1 new volunteers to accommodate the new visitor 
information desk at the National Museum of the American Indian 
and normal volunteer attrition 

• Keep the VIARC sections of the Smithsonian website updated and 
accurate 



201 



Strengthened Scientific Research 

Conduct focused scientific research programs that are recognized 
nationally and internationally (7 FTE and $50,000) 

• Recruit approximately 550 Behind-the-Scene Volunteers in 
FY 2005 to assist Smithsonian units in performing research 

Enhanced Management Excellence 

Strengthen an Institutional culture that is customer-centered and 
results oriented (1 FTE and $249,000) 

• Through the Web Content Unit, establish an Institution-wide set of 
guidelines for Web content quality, and compliance with 
Smithsonian privacy and accessibility policies 

• Create pan-Institutional content for the website that emphasizes 
connections among exhibitions, collections, and other offerings at 
the Smithsonian 

Maintain mutually beneficial relations with the news media and with 
federal, state, and local governments (5 FTEs and $490,000) 

• Respond to all media inquiries with accurate, concise information 
within 24 hours 

• Increase by 10% the alerts of positive stories to the press of all 
kinds of events at the Smithsonian, from behind-the-scenes 
research to new acquisitions 

• Organize approximately 25 events specifically for journalists 

• Publish a monthly employee newspaper and a biweekly staff 
newsletter 

FY 2005 REQUEST-EXPLANATION OF CHANGE 

The FY 2005 budget estimate includes an increase of $514,000 and 
4 FTEs. Included are an increase of $38,000 for necessary pay for existing 
staff, justified in the Non-discretionary Costs section of this budget, and a 
program increase of 4 FTEs and $476,000 to support operation of a Web 
Content Unit. The increases are as follows: 

• (-1- $342,000, + 4 FTEs) This increase is necessary to enable OPA to hire 
qualified staff to operate a new Web Content Unit. Positions to be funded 
include director, program manager, program assistant, and a content 
developer. This unit will increase the quality and reach of the Smithsonian 
Web presence by providing content oversight on the central website, 
maintaining guidelines and standards, systematically monitoring and 
assessing audience needs and use patterns, developing new Web content 
and features, and planning and implementing a strategic approach for 
Smithsonian Web communication. 



202 



• ( + $134,000, + FTEs) This one-time funding will be required to 
support the operation of the Web Content Unit. Included are funds for 
office furniture, computers, software, supplies, training, and travel 
($34,000), and funding for contracted design services ($100,000). 

If the FY 2005 requested increase is not allowed, the maintenance and 
growth of the Institution's central website will revert to the current minimal 
conditions, and pan-Institutional issues such as setting policy on updates, 
domain names, promotion of Smithsonian programs on the site, and 
accessibility guidelines will remain unaddressed. The Institution will continue 
to employ a site design that requires considerable technical expertise to 
update; it will still be difficult to train content providers to produce and post 
updates; and it will remain difficult to fit new features such as Smithsonian 
science and research into the current central website structure. Without this 
unit, the website will continue to present multiple, self-contained museums 
rather than an integrated whole Smithsonian. The Institution will lose a 
catalyst for improving the quality and quantity of online offerings, the ability 
to create a single unified marketing plan for its online presence, and the cost 
savings involved with sharing technology, expertise, and software 
purchases. 



203 



INSTITUTION-WIDE PROGRAMS 





APPLICATION OF OPERATING RESOURCES 


FEDERAL 
APPROPRIATIONS 


GENERAL 
TRUST 


DONOR/SPONSOR 
DESIGNATED 


GOV'T GRANTS 
& CONTRACTS 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FY 2003 
ESTIMATE 





5,967 




















FY 2004 
ESTIMATE 





6,195 




















FY 2005 
ESTIMATE 





6,195 





















STRATEGIC GOALS: INCREASED PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT, STRENGTHENED 
SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH, ENHANCED MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE 

Federal Resource Summary by Performance Objective 



Performance 
Objective 


FY 
FTE 


2004 
$000 


FY 
FTE 


2005 
$000 


CI- 
FTE 


lange 
$000 


Increased Public Engagement: 














Expand a national outreach effort 





1,185 





1,185 








Strengthened Scientific Research: 














Conduct focused scientific research programs that 
are recognized nationally and internationally 





1,706 





1,706 








Enhanced Management Excellence: 














Modernize the institution's information technology 
systems and infrastructure 





3,304 





3,304 








Total 





6.195 





6,195 









BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT 

In 1 993, Congress approved and permitted the Smithsonian to 
reallocate funds to create two Institution-wide funding programs: one to 
support the units' needs for state-of-the-art research equipment, and the 
other to address information technology needs across the Institution 
systematically. In FY 1995, the Institution first received funds to support the 
development of a third Institution-wide program, this one for Latino 
initiatives, including research, collections acquisitions, exhibitions, and 
educational programming. 



204 



Institution-wide programs consist of the following pools: Latino 
Initiatives pool. Research Equipment pool, and Information Resources 
Management (IRM) pool. 

MEANS AND STRATEGY 

To achieve the goal of Increased Public Engagement, the Latino 
Initiatives pool continues to support research, collections, public and 
educational programs, and exhibitions. These activities will generate and 
advance knowledge and understanding of the contributions of Latinas and 
Latinos to U.S. history, culture, arts, music, and science at a national level. 
The Institution has $1,185,000 in its current base for these initiatives. These 
funds are dispersed annually to Smithsonian units on a competitive basis, 
with an emphasis on projects with the potential to attract matching and, 
ultimately, sustaining funds from nonappropriated sources. 

The goal of Strengthened Scientific Research will be addressed by 
providing funds from the Research Equipment pool to purchase state-of-the 
art equipment to perform cutting-edge scientific research or for equipment 
required to carry out historical research and conservation projects. The 
Research Equipment pool continues to be essential for the science units and 
research departments of the museums to replace outdated research 
equipment with new technology or to replace standard equipment that is 
broken or has outlived its usefulness. The current base funding for the 
research equipment pool is $1,706,000. The federal base is often leveraged 
with external support, multiplying the funds available. 

In FY 2005, the goal of Enhanced Management Excellence will be 
addressed by primarily focusing Information Resources Management pool 
resources on upgrades and enhancements to the Smithsonian's information 
technology infrastructure, enhancements to the applications and data 
content of Collections Information Systems in the museums, and making the 
data content available to the public via the Web. 

The base amount for the IRM pool is $3,304,000. In FY 2005, the 
Institution proposes to continue to use $1 ,846,000 of this amount to 
support the Managed Information Technology Infrastructure initiative, which 
is justified under the Administration line item. Annual performance goals 
related to this portion of the IRM pool funds are also included there. 



205 



STRATEGIC GOALS AND FY 2005 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE GOALS 

Increased Public Engagement 

Expand a national outreach effort (0 FTEs and $7, 185,000) 

• Co-produce programs that will benefit audiences in Washington DC 
as well as affiliate museums nationwide through partnerships with 
community organizations and the affiliate museums 

• Continue to establish baseline data to determine if underserved 
audiences are being reached in FY 2005 by Latino-pool funded 
initiative 

Strengthened Scientific Research 

Conduct focused scientific research programs that are recognized 
nationally and internationally (0 FTEs and $1,706,000) 

• Replace, upgrade, and acquire cutting edge technology to support 
the Smithsonian's research mission and four scientific themes, and 
to address problems and recommendations identified in the 2003 
Science Commission Report 

• Increase the capacity to digitize and make available a wide range of 
archival documents, including photographs, and increase access to 
these documents to researchers around the world via the Web 

• Increase capability to perform research in the arts such as the 
study of carbon pigments and Chinese jade and analysis of bronze 
samples, as well as conservation of collections 

Enhanced Management Excellence 

Modernize the Institution's information technology systems and 
infrastructure (0 FTEs and $3,304,000) 

• Enhance Smithsonian Collection Information Systems and make the 
data content available to the public through the Web 



206 



OFFICE OF EXHIBITS CENTRAL 





APPLICATION OF OPERATING RESOURCES 


FEDERAL 
APPROPRIATIONS 


GENERAL 
TRUST 


DONOR/SPONSOR 
DESIGNATED 


GOVT GRANTS 
& CONTRACTS 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FY 2003 
ESTIMATE 


35 


2,571 


3 


265 














P(' 2004 
ESTIMATE 


35 


2,659 


2 


232 





10 





1 


FY 2005 
ESTIMATE 


35 


2,764 


1 


175 





40 









STRATEGIC GOALS: INCREASED PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT; ENHANCED 

MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE 

Federal Resource Summary by Performance Objective 



Performance 
Objective 


FY 

FTE 


2004 
$000 


FY 
FTE 


2005 
$000 


Ch 
hit 


lange 
$000 
















Increased Public Engagement: 














Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and other 
public programs 


31 


2,407 


31 


2,500 




93 


Enhanced Management Excellence: 














Strengthen an Institutional culture that is customer- 
centered and results-oriented 


4 


252 


4 


264 




12 


Total 


35 


2,659 


35 


2.764 





105 



BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT 

The mission of the Office of Exhibits Central (DEC) is to provide 
comprehensive exhibition services to the Smithsonian Institution and the 
larger museum community so they can provide compelling, high quality, 
cost-effective exhibitions that connect the American people to their history 
and cultural and scientific heritages. 

To achieve the goal of Increased Public Engagement, GEO will expand 
its project management capability to ensure a more coordinated, full-service, 
and cost-effective approach to exhibit production. Of equal importance will 
be the expansion of OEC's consultation and exhibition planning services in 
order to improve pan-Institutionally the exhibition planning and development 



207 



process. In addition, OEC will outsource more production-oriented work, 
increase the amount of unique work done in house, and broaden its 
collaborations with other Smithsonian units. To achieve the goal of Enhanced 
Management Excellence, OEC will ensure that its cost reimbursement 
process is fair, reasonable, and sound and will measure progress through 
feedback from customers. 

For FY 2005, the estimate includes an increase of $105,000 for 
necessary pay for staff under this line item. 

MEANS AND STRATEGY 

As the Smithsonian's most comprehensive exhibition producer, OEC is 
dedicated to providing its Smithsonian clients with first-class exhibition 
design, editing, production, and installation services. Each year OEC designs 
and produces over 100 projects, large and small, for almost every office and 
museum in the Smithsonian. The Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition 
Service continues to be OEC's largest client. 

The majority of OEC resources will be focused on accomplishing the 
goal of Increased Public Engagement by 

• improving the quality of exhibition design, production, and installation 
services 

• increasing and maintaining staff knowledge and expertise in state-of-the- 
art technology, techniques, and advances in the exhibit field, and 
upgrading equipment to support emerging trends 

• improving the OEC exhibit process 

To accomplish these objectives, OEC will outsource more of the 
routine, repetitive non-exhibit work to private contractors, thus freeing up 
OEC staff with specialized experience to concentrate on exhibit projects that 
require unique skills. OEC will also build on well-established, collaborative 
relationships with other Smithsonian design and production units, and will 
expand existing relationships and develop new ones with the many private 
exhibition design and production companies available today. Additional 
results will be a more informed and expert staff through increased funding 
for training, increased digital output from graphics services by allocating 
resources to modernize the graphics production equipment, and an improved 
object preparation and storage facility. 



208 



OEC has two objectives that support the Institutional goal of Enhanced 
Management Excellence: 

• providing leadership, technical advice, and guidance to staff and the 
museum community 

• improving administrative management functions in human resources, 
budget execution and fiscal data management, and procurement 

STRATEGIC GOALS AND FY 2005 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE GOALS 

increased Public Engagement 

Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and other public programs 
(31 FTEs and $2,500,000) 

• To improve the exhibition planning process at the Smithsonian 
Institution, expand OEC consultation and exhibit planning services 
by 10% over FY 2002 levels 

• Expand and improve project management capability and resources 
by 10% over FY 2003 

Enhanced l\/ianagement Excellence 

Strengthen an Institutional culture that is customer-centered and 
results-oriented (4 FTEs and $264,000) 

• Highlight the strategic plan, annual performance plan, mission, and 
vision of OEC and the Smithsonian at all staff meetings 

• To better serve the needs of the public, actively support the 
diversity goals of the Institution, aiming to increase diversity 
workforce initiatives, including internships, by 10% over FY 2002 
levels 



209 



MAJOR SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTATION 





APPLICATION OF OPERATING RESOURCES 


FEDERAL 
APPROPRIATIONS 


GENERAL 
TRUST 


DONOR/SPONSOR 
DESIGNATED 


GOV'T GRANTS 
& CONTRACTS 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FY 2003 

ESTIMATE 





4,968 




















Pi' 2004 
ESTIMATE 





5,000 




















FY 2005 

ESTIMATE 





5,000 





















STRATEGIC GOALS: STRENGTHENED SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH 



Federal Resource Summary by Performance Objective 



Performance 
Objective 


FY 
FTE 


2004 
$000 


FY 

FTE 


2005 
$000 


Change 
FTE $000 
















Strengthened Scientific Research: 














Conduct focused scientific research programs that 
are recognized nationally and internationally 





5,000 





5,000 








Total 





5,000 





5,000 









BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT 

The mission of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) is to 
conduct research to increase understanding of the origin and nature of the 
universe and to communicate this information through publications, teaching, 
and public presentations. 

To meet the goal of Strengthened Scientific Research, SAO uses its 
multi-year funding from the Major Scientific Instrumentation line item to 
develop large-scale instrumentation projects that enable Smithsonian 
scientists to remain at the forefront of their fields. Currently funded through 
this line item are two SAO projects: the development of an array of 
submillimeter telescopes (SMA) and its instrumentation on Mauna Kea, 
Hawaii, and instrumentation for the converted Multiple Mirror Telescope 
(MMT) at SAO's Fred L. Whipple Observatory on Mt. Hopkins, Arizona. 
Because of the magnitude of the costs and the time required to fabricate 



210 



major new instruments and to reconfigure existing ones, the institution 
requests funding for these projects to be available until expended. 

MEANS AND STRATEGY 

The SMA currently combines the light from five out of its final total of 
eight submillimeter telescopes at three different frequencies, simulating the 
resolving power of a much larger telescope. Notable among the results in 
FY 2003 was the publication of the first paper in a refereed journal, which 
described the temporal variability of the radio source that surrounds the 
black hole in the center of our galaxy. Another focus of research has been 
the study of the distribution of molecular gas in nearby spiral galaxies. While 
optical images trace the stars in the galaxies, the SMA image highlights the 
molecular clouds where the next generation of stars is being born. FY 2005 
base resources will be used to continue work on three sets of receivers for 
the SMA. These receivers are necessary to allow observations at key 
frequencies at which the SMA will operate and to allow polarization 
measurements, both of which provide critical information on properties of 
the low-temperature universe. The polarization signature of the submillimeter 
wavelength emission from the center of our galaxy provides a unique means 
to determine how much material is flowing onto the massive black hole 
located there, which is important in understanding the evolution of our own 
galaxy and of galaxies in general. 

FY 2005 base resources will also be used to continue the development 
of two key instruments for the converted MMT: Binospec and MMIRS. 
Binospec is a wide field optical spectrograph that will allow scientists to 
study how galaxies have evolved over 75 percent of the universe's lifetime. 
MMIRS is a powerful infrared camera and spectrograph that will allow 
scientists to penetrate the obscuring dust that veils star-forming regions in 
our own galaxy and distant galaxies. Understanding how stars form 
throughout time and space is a key goal of modern astrophysics, which is 
the key to understanding our origins. 

STRATEGIC GOALS AND FY 2005 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE GOALS 

Strengthened Scientific Research 

Conduct focused scientific research programs that are recognized 
nationally and internationally (0 FTEs and $5,000,000) 

• For the Submillimeter Array, commission a full set of receivers to 
cover the 300-420 GHz band. This coverage will provide access to 
the little-explored band above 360 GHz, which contains numerous 
spectral lines of great importance to the understanding of the 
astrochemistry of the interstellar medium. These receivers will also 



211 



give the SMA the ability to measure the polarization of cosmic 

signals, which provide key information on the physical processes 

taking place in astrophysical systems. 

For the MMT, complete the design of Binospec to a level sufficient 

to conduct a critical design review in preparation for the 

construction phase 

For the MMT, complete the design of MMIRS to a level sufficient 

to conduct the preliminary design review 



212 



MUSEUM SUPPORT CENTER 





APPLICATION OF OPERATING RESOURCES 


FEDERAL 
APPROPRIATIONS 


GENERAL 
TRUST 


DONOR/SPONSOR 
DESIGNATED 


GOV'T GRANTS 
& CONTRACTS 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FY 2003 
ESTIMATE 


45 


2,453 




















FY 2004 
ESTIMATE 


28 


1,678 




















FY 2005 
ESTIMATE 


28 


1,741 





















STRATEGIC GOAL: INCREASED PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT 



Federal Resource Summary by Performance Objective 



Performance 
Objective 


FY 
FTE 


2004 
$000 


FY 
FTE 


2005 
$000 


Change 
FTE $000 
















Increased Public Engagement: 














Innprove the stewardship of the national 
collections 


28 


1,678 


28 


1,741 





63 


Total 


28 


1,678 


28 


1,741 





63 



BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT 

The Museum Support Center (MSC) is the principal off-site 
conservation and collections storage facility for the National Museum of 
Natural History's irreplaceable national collections and also houses 
collections of the National Museum of American History. Located in Suitland, 
Maryland, this facility houses more than 31 million objects. MSC 
accommodates collections storage for three general types of media: 
collections storage in cabinets, open shelving for biological specimens in 
alcohol, and high bay storage for very large objects such as totem poles, 
boats, meteorites, and large mounted mammals. 

The facility also houses laboratories for molecular systematics, 
conservation, and other specialized research. The MSC staff provides 
administrative, shipping, and receiving services; collections management 
services including preservation and logistics; and safety and pest control. 



213 



The staff also oversees security operations, maintains strict environmental 
standards and collections cleaning services required for the proper storage of 
museum collections, and provides computer support services for 
administrative, research, and collections management data needs. 

For FY 2005, the estimate includes an increase of $63,000 for 
necessary pay for existing staff funded under this line item. 

MEANS AND STRATEGY 

To support the goal of Increased Public Engagement, funding will be 
used to provide more reliable environmental conditions by properly 
maintaining equipment and upgrading facilities to meet laboratory 
requirements for conservation needs. Further, in FY 2005, funds will be used 
to prepare collections stored in alcohol and other fluids for relocation from 
the Natural History Building (NHB) on the Mall to MSC and to relocate to 
MSC dry collections related to these fluid collections. 

Included in the Smithsonian's FY 2005 Facilities Capital request is 
$18 million to construct MSC's Pod 5 to safely store the Museum's valuable 
biological collections currently stored in alcohol in NHB. 

STRATEGIC GOALS AND FY 2005 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE GOALS 

Increased Public Engagement 

Improve the stewardship of the national collections for present and 
future generations (28 FTEs and $1,741,000) 

• Prepare the vertebrate, invertebrate, and botanical collections 
stored in alcohol and other fluids for relocation from the Natural 
History Building to the Museum Support Center. These collections 
total 11,175 specimens 

• Ensure the safety of staff and collections by addressing all 
recommendations from annual Management Evaluation and 
Technical Reviews 

• Continue to provide improved collections care: cleaning, storage 
(such as object supports and archival storage containers) and pest 
control practices 

• Improve accessibility of collections for researchers by enhancing 
electronic access through upgraded infrastructure such as wireless 
computer access, imaging, communications and electronic 
conference capabilities 

• Continue to enhance transportation services to improve 
accessibility of collections, and improve shipping and receiving 
procedures to better integrate services between NHB and MSC 



214 



SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION ARCHIVES 





APPLICATION OF OPERATING RESOURCES 


FEDERAL 
APPROPRIATIONS 


GENERAL 
TRUST 


DONOR/SPONSOR 
DESIGNATED 


GOV'T GRANTS 
& CONTRACTS 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FY 2003 
ESTIMATE 


22 


1,601 


2 


140 


1 


171 








FY 2004 
ESTIMATE 


23 


1,664 


2 


140 


1 


181 








FY 2005 
ESTIMATE 


23 


1,732 


2 


140 


1 


186 









STRATEGIC GOALS: INCREASED PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT; ENHANCED 

MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE 

Federal Resource Summary by Performance Objective 



Performance 
Objective 


FY 

FTE 


2004 
$000 


FY 
FTE 


2005 
$000 


Ch 
FTE 


lange 
$000 
















increased Public Engagement: 














Strengthen the high caliber of Smithsonian 
scholarship in support of public programs 


8 


570 


8 


594 








improve the stewardship of the national collections 


13 


857 


13 


895 








Enhanced Management Excellence: 














Modernize the Institution's information technology 
systems and infrastructure 


2 


237 


2 


243 








Total 


23 


1,664 


23 


1.732 





68 



BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT 



I ne omiinsonian msiiTUTion Arcnives (SIA) is the institutional memory 
of a unique American cultural resource and a steward of ^^'^ r.^+;^r,oi 

■ir\nc 



The Smithsonian Institution Archi 
nique " " — — • 

collections. 



the national 



To achieve the goal of Increased Public Engagement, SIA will ensure 
institutional accountability; enhance public appreciation of a great national 
treasure; and serve the Smithsonian community, scholars, and the general 
public by appraising, acquiring, and preserving the records of the Institution 
and related documentary materials; establishing policies and providing 
guidance for management of the national collections; offering a range of 



215 



reference, research, and records services; and creating products that 
promote understanding of the Smithsonian and its history. 

For FY 2005, the estimate includes an increase of $68,000 for 
necessary pay for existing staff funded under this line item. 

MEANS AND STRATEGY 

In FY 2005, SIA will be focused on moving staff and collections from 
the Arts and Industries Building, which will be closed, to a new location (see 
Facilities Capital account for further discussion of this project). If funds are 
available, SIA collections from other locations will also be consolidated in the 
new space. 

In addition to this major activity, SIA will continue efforts to provide 
online access to research information; collaborate fully with units — such as 
The Smithsonian Associates, the Smithsonian Center for Education and 
Museum Services (SCEMS), and the Affiliations Program— that serve broad 
external audiences; and set standards and provide support for the 
Smithsonian collections management community, in support of Increased 
Public Engagement. 

SIA will also solidify the ongoing operation of a conservation 
laboratory initiated in FY 2003 to meet the conservation needs of the 
Smithsonian archival community. Resources will also be dedicated to 
presentations and publications that focus on the Institution's history as well 
as focused activity to capture and preserve electronic records (such as 
websites and email) that are key sources of Institutional information today 
and Smithsonian history tomorrow. 

STRATEGIC GOALS AND FY 2005 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE GOALS 

Increased Public Engagement 

Strengthen the high caliber of Smithsonian scholarship in support of 
public programs (8 FTEs and $594,000) 

• Make readily available information about the world and life of the 
Smithsonian's first Secretary by publishing volume 10 and 
completing 50% of the text editing for volume 1 1 of The Papers of 
Joseph Henry 

• Conduct a minimum of 6 public presentations on Smithsonian 
history drawn from SlA's collections to reveal to local, non- 
scholarly audiences the wealth of information in the Smithsonian 
Archives 



216 



• Support the Smithsonian Center for Education and Museum 
Studies' efforts to reach teachers and non-Smithsonian museum 
professionals by providing at least 1 instructor for 2 annual SCEMS 
workshops 

• Give at least 6 lectures on Smithsonian history through the 
Affiliations Program and The Smithsonian Associates 

• Increase by 5% the records in the Smithsonian Legal History 
database, the Smithsonian Image database, the History of the 
Smithsonian Bibliography, and the Smithsonian Chronology to 
enhance online access to Institutional information 

Improve the stewardship of the national collections (13 FTEs and 
$895,000) 

• Manage risk, assure Institutional accountability, and ensure 
efficient use of office space by conducting surveys and creating 
records schedules for the Smithsonian American Art Museum, 
Office of Contracting, and Office of Protection Services 

• Provide greater public access to information about SIA's holdings 
by completing the digitization and placement online of all SIA 
finding aids and add 200 new records to Smithsonian Research 
Information System 

• Assist a minimum of five units with revisions of their Collections 
Management Policy 

Enhanced Management Excellence 

Modernize the Institution's information technology systems and 
infrastructure (2 FTEs and $243,000) 

• Ensure the future availability of records in electronic form (including 
email, collections information systems, word-processed documents, 
and digital images) through development of a fully operational 
preservation system 

• Develop a pan-Institutional information system to capture routine 
collections management data and support the central Performance 
Management Information System 



217 



SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION LIBRARIES 





APPLICATION OF OPERATING RESOURCES 


FEDERAL 
APPROPRIATIONS 


GENERAL 
TRUST 


DONOR/SPONSOR 
DESIGNATED 


GOV'T GRANTS 
& CONTRACTS 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FY 2003 
ESTIMATE 


109 


8,453 


11 


962 


1 


488 








FY 2004 
ESTIMATE 


111 


8,813 


10 


937 





2,081 








FY 2005 
ESTIMATE 


111 


9,279 


10 


920 





471 









STRATEGIC GOALS: INCREASED PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT; STRENGTHENED 
SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH; ENHANCED MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE 

Federal Resource Summary by Performance Objective 



Performance 
Objective 


FY 

FTE 


2004 
$000 


FY 

FTE 


2005 
$000 


FTE 


lange 
$000 
















Increased Public Engagement: 














Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and other 
public programs 


1 


64 


1 


65 





1 


Expand a national outreach effort 


2 


138 


2 


143 





5 


Strengthen the high caliber of Smithsonian 
scholarship in support of public programs 


20 


1,658 


20 


1,709 





51 


Improve the stewardship of the national collections 


65 


5,057 


65 


5,408 





351 


Strengthened Scientific Research: 














Develop the intellectual component of the 
collections by performing collections-based studies 


12 


1,032 


12 


1,064 





32 


Enhanced Management Excellence: 














Strengthen an Institutional culture that is customer- 
centered and results-oriented 


7 


578 


7 


597 





19 


Modernize the Institution's' financial management 
systems and functions 


2 


146 


2 


151 





5 


Modernize the Institution's information technology 
systems and infrastructure 


1 


58 


1 


59 





1 


Ensure that Smithsonian workforce is efficient, 
collaborative, committed, and innovative 


1 


65 


1 


66 





1 


Recruit, hire, and retain a diverse workforce and 
promote equal opportunity 





17 





17 








Total 


111 


8,813 


111 


9,279 





466 



218 



BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT 

The Smithsonian Institution Libraries (SIL) was established to support 
the research, curatorial and exhibition activities of the Smithsonian by 
providing and organizing pertinent information sources. To that end SIL 
acquires, organizes, and delivers scholarly, scientific, and educational 
resources and information in all forms, including electronic. SIL anticipates 
the need for information appropriate to the Institution's priorities and fills 
inquiries from the government, universities, researchers, and the public 
worldwide. SIL exhibits and interprets its collections and sponsors 
educational activities for a broad audience through public programs and 
publications. 

For FY 2005, the estimate includes a program Increase of $200,000 
to purchase electronic resources and cover the annual inflation rate and an 
increase of $266,000 for necessary pay for existing staff funded under this 
line item. 

MEANS AND STRATEGY 

In FY 2005, SIL will address the Smithsonian goal of Increased Public 
Engagement by providing high-quality, timely information services directly to 
the Smithsonian community and the public from libraries located in museums 
and research institutes and through the Internet. SIL continues to be the 
primary vehicle for providing journals and other critical information to 
Smithsonian researchers. SIL staff will build and refine collections with a 
focus in FY 2005 on service to the National Air and Space Museum Udvar- 
Hazy Center, the Center for Latino Initiatives and the National Museum of 
the American Indian (NMAI) Mall Museum. SIL will continue to maintain 
exchanges of books and journals with more than 4,000 institutions 
worldwide and borrow and lend books as a substitute for buying crucial 
titles. 

The Libraries' online catalog is accessible through the Smithsonian 
Institution Research and Information System (SIRIS). SIL will enhance its 
collections information system by adding records to SIRIS for newly acquired 
titles, holdings data on backfiles of journals, and serials check-in records for 
currently received issues. SIL will continue a vigilant program of collection 
maintenance through binding, general collections repair, microfilming, and 
photocopying. 

In FY 2005, SIL will share national treasures with the public through 
its ongoing program of well-regarded book exhibitions, lectures, and 
symposia. SIL will open an exhibition on Book Illustration. Planning has 



219 



begun for a traveling exhibition entitled Doodles, Drafts and Designs, 
scheduled to travel to 12 venues during 2005. This exhibition will make a 
small segment of SIL's trade literature collection better known. Both the 
Baird and Dibner Scholarship programs will aid SIL in building collaborations 
with scholarly programs both in the Institution and elsewhere. 

SIL will increase electronic content, such as digitized scientific- 
instruments trade literature and online exhibitions to the public through its 
website. Galaxy of Knowledge. SIL intends to continue reviewing user 
satisfaction with its website and will implement enhancements accordingly. 

To achieve the goal of Strengthened Scientific Research, SIL will 
retain information in science as a priority in FY 2005. SIL has already shifted 
spending within collections management in an attempt to sustain its 
outstanding collections in support of scientific research. SIL will continue to 
support science by providing state of the art reference services, 
administering the Scientific Translations publications program, acquiring new 
electronic resources, organizing Web resources in the sciences and training 
researchers to use electronic resources efficiently and effectively. 

The expansion of online tools — such as the electronic Biologia Centrali- 
Americana and the electronic United States Exploring Expedition begun in 
2002 — will continue to give scientists the documentation they have sought 
for their research and will bring to light underutilized resources for scientific 
research. 

SIL provides centralized administrative support so each library can 
focus on service to its clientele. In FY 2005, staff will actively seek to 
achieve Enhanced Management Excellence by building increased diversity of 
the library workforce, implementing a new integrated library system, 
expanding digital production and reviewing SIL unit costs and productivity 
against benchmarks. 

STRATEGIC GOALS AND FY 2005 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE GOALS 

Increased Public Engagement 

Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and other public programs 
(1 FTE, $65,000) 

• Open one new exhibit to increase knowledge of the contribution 
that Smithsonian publications have made to the publishing of 
scientific illustrations 

• Increase visitor attendance by implementing 20% of visitor 
comments 



220 



Expand a national outreach effort (2 FTE, $143,000) 

• Reach a wider audience and increase knowledge of rare SIL 
materials through website upgrades, as measured by an increase 
from 3.2 million to 4 million hits 

• Enhance S/L on Display and Galaxy of Knowledge websites 

• Partner with SITES and NMAH on traveling exhibit entitled 
Doodles, Drafts and Designs, scheduled to travel to 1 2 venues in 
FY 2004-2005 

Strengthen the high caliber of Smithsonian scholarship in support of 
public programs (21 FTE, $1,709,000) 

• Complete the establishment of the full range of library services for 
the NMAI Mall Museum and the Center for Latino Initiatives 

• Hold annual Dibner and Baird public lectures and publish the Dibner 
lecture to present research based on SIL collections to a broad 
audience 

Improve the stewardship of the national collections (65 FTE, 
$5,408,000) 

• Improve access to SIL's unique special collections through 
increased cataloging of trade literature collections and art libraries' 
vertical files by 10% more than FY 2004 

• Increase access to SIL's collection by adding holding information to 
SIRIS on backfiles of journals by an additional 25% of collection 
holdings, with 50% of libraries completed by the end of 2005 

• Increase public service by completing installation of HVAC and 
compact shelving at 1111 North Capitol, reshelving the entire 
collection in classification order 

• By reorganizing technical services, increase productivity in 
acquisitions, cataloging, and preservation by 10% over the 2004 
level 

Strengthened Scientific Research 

Develop the intellectual component of the collections by performing 
collections-based studies (12 FTE, $1,064,000) 

• Enhance electronic Biologia Centrali-Americana through full text 
conversion to allow full-text searching and linking to external 
databases. 

• Expand electronic US Exploring Expedition to increase knowledge 
of an important 1 9th century scientific expedition and related 
collections through addition of links from the text to museum 
collections objects 

• By organizing and providing links to the Internet by at least 10% 
above the FY 2004 level, increase access to electronic science 
resources 



221 



Enhanced Management Excellence 

Strengthen an Institutional culture that is customer-centered and 
results-oriented (7 FTE, $597,000) 

• Provide remote access to licensed databases for Smithsonian staff 
after resolution of security issues 

• Respond to issues raised in FY 2004 survey given to library patrons 

• Implement additional features of automated inter-library loan 
services including direct online patron requests, automatic 
notification of receipt and overdue materials, and seamless 
interface to bibliographic databases for borrowing and lending 

Modernize the Institution's financial management systems and 
functions (2 FTE, $151,000) 

• Expand the use of the purchase card by making its use mandatory 
for routine supplies, equipment, shipping, interlibrary loan and 
some categories of library materials 

• Implement new Enterprise Resource Planning system modules 
including Personnel and Travel 

Modernize the Institution 's information technology systems and 
infrastructure (1 FTE, $59,000) 

• Implement acquisitions and cataloging modules of new integrated 
library system to continue acquiring and cataloging library materials 
without delays 

• Enter more than 6,000 manual records into SIRIS to complete 
conversion of serial check-in records to online records 

Ensure that the Smithsonian's workforce is efficient, collaborative, 
committed and innovative (1 FTE, $66,000) 

• Improve supervisory training and expand staff skills by cross 
training at least two staff and ensuring that supervisors follow 
established training schedules 

• Complete studies of comparability of SIL's organizational structure 
and pay levels to other institutions to ensure that technicians will 
be at appropriate grade levels 

Recruit, hire, and retain a diverse workforce and promote equal 
opportunity (0 FTE, $17,000) 

• Improve diversity of staff, by increasing qualified African-American 
and Hispanic application pool for vacancies in SIL by 5% 

FY 2005 REQUEST -EXPLANATION OF CHANGE 

The FY 2005 budget estimate includes an increase of $466,000. 
Included are an increase of $266,000 for necessary pay for existing staff 
and an increase of $200,000 to build and maintain collections that support 
program and research priorities of the Smithsonian, as follows: 



222 



• ( + $200,000) This increase is to purchase electronic resources and to 
both strengthen and maintain SIL's collections of electronic resources, 
books, and journals and to cover the annual inflation rate for these 
materials. Of this total increase, $100,000 is to purchase much-needed 
electronic journals and databases and $100,000 is both to absorb an 
annual inflationary increase of 5-9% ($45,000-$90,000) on its entire 
journal budget, and to add important new titles with remaining funds. 

If the FY 2005 request is not allowed, SIL will cancel more existing 
print subscriptions, forgo many requested subscription electronic resources 
such as \Neb of Science, and reduce book expenditures further. These 
actions will adversely affect the research support for all Smithsonian units. 



223 



ADMINISTRATION 





APPLICATION OF OPERATING RESOURCES 


FEDERAL 
APPROPRIATIONS 


GENERAL 
TRUST 


DONOR/SPONSOR 
DESIGNATED 


GOV'T GRANTS 
& CONTRACTS 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FY 2003 
ESTIMATE 


334 


60,601 


176 


25,268 


2 


850 








FY 2004 
ESTIMATE 


340 


64,687 


202 


25,841 


1 


1,495 








FY 2005 
ESTIMATE 


344 


72,355 


201 


25,753 


1 


422 









STRATEGIC GOALS: INCREASED PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT; STRENGTHENED SCIENTIFIC 
RESEARCH; ENHANCED MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE; GREATER FINANCIAL STRENGTH 

Federal Resource Summary by Performance Objective 



Performance 
Objective 


FY 
FTE 


2004 
$000 


FY 
FTE 


2005 
$000 


C 
FTE 


lange 
$000 


Increased Public Engagement: 














Offer compelling first-class exhibitions and other public 
programs 


6 


510 


6 


527 





17 


Expand a national outreach effort 


9 


720 


9 


744 





24 


Develop and bring first-class educational resources to the 
nation 


1 


132 


1 


137 





5 


Improve the stewardship of the national collections 


11 


877 


11 


908 





31 


Strengthened Scientific Research: 














Provide focus for the Institution's science resources 


8 


1169 


8 


1405 





236 


Conduct focused, scientific research programs that are 
recognized nationally and internationally 











200 





200 


Develop the intellectual component of the collections by 
performing collections-based studies 











50 





50 


Enhanced Management Excellence: 














Strengthen an Institutional culture that is customer- 
centered and results-oriented 


69 


7,995 


70 


8,488 


1 


493 


Modernize the Institution's financial management systems 
and functions 


25 


2,338 


25 


2,417 





79 


Modernize the Institution's information technology 
systems and infrastructure 


105 


37,937 


105 


43,410 





5,473 


Ensure that the Smithsonian's workforce is efficient, 
collaborative, commined, and innovative 


66 


9,594 


66 


10,248 





654 


Recruit, hire, and retain a diverse workforce and promote 
equal opportunity 


11 


1,080 


11 


1,098 





18 


Enhance the reputation of the Smithsonian by maintaining 
good relations with the news media and with federal, 
state, and local governments 


5 


455 


5 


470 





15 


Complete major construction projects now underway 


21 


1,475 


24 


1,838 


3 


363 


Greater Financial Strength: 














Secure the financial resources needed to carry out the 
Institution's mission 


3 


405 


3 


415 





10 


Total 


340 


64,687 


344 


72,355 


4 


7,668 



224 



BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT 

The Smithsonian Institution Adnninistration program provides vision, 
leadership, policy, and oversight associated with managing and operating the 
museums and research centers. Administration includes executive leadership 
provided by the Office of the Secretary, the Under Secretaries for American 
Museums and National Programs and Science and the Director of the 
International Art Museums Division, as well as the central administration 
activities of human resources, diversity, government relations, financial 
management, information management, contract management, and legal 
services. 

For FY 2005, the estimate includes a net increase of 4 FTEs and 
$7,668,000, including an increase of $1,572,000 for necessary pay for 
existing staff funded under this line item (which includes an increase of 
$454,000 for workers' compensation); a decrease of $3,676,000 associated 
with the redirection of development costs to operations and maintenance for 
the Enterprise Resource Planning System, and a decrease of $247,000 for 
the consolidation of the Institution's application servers as discussed under 
the Non-recurring Costs section of this justification; a decrease of $151,000 
associated with communications which is justified in the Non-discretionary 
Costs section of this budget, and an increase of 4 FTEs and $10,170,000 
for programmatic increases. 

MEANS AND STRATEGY 

The Institution will employ appropriate management strategies to 
enhance the "increase and diffusion of knowledge" and achieve the 
Institution's goals. The following strategies are cross-cutting and are key to 
performing the Smithsonian's mission of connecting Americans to their 
history and heritage, and promoting innovation, research, and discovery in 
science: 

• Provide high-quality leadership and oversight for all policies, programs, 
and activities of the Institution's museums and research centers by 
attracting, recruiting, and retaining leaders possessing superior talent. 

• Manage human resources, foster diversity, and align human capital with 
the Institution's goals and performance objectives. Ensure that the right 
people are in the right jobs by implementing the recommendations of the 
Smithsonian's comprehensive workforce analysis study. Modernize 
human resource management processes and systems to support 
responsiveness to employee and employer needs. 

• Employ state-of-the-art, secure information systems to modernize 
financial, human resources, collections, and facilities management 



225 



processes by continuing to implement modules of a commercial Enterprise 
Resource Planning (ERP) system; continue to mal<e improvements in the 
network security infrastructure; continue a 4-year replacement cycle for 
desktop workstations; and consolidate application servers. 

• Enhance the Institution's collections management capability in FY 2005, 
by replacing the Smithsonian Research Information System (SIRIS) 
commercial product Horizon with a new commercial product that provides 
additional critical functionality. 

• To support research on animal conservation, environmental monitoring, 
and landscape modification, create three Geographic Information System 
(GIS) nodes to enable scientists to conduct pan-Institutional research; 
have access to the latest analytical tools; collect data in a broader, 
natural context; gather continuous data on a greater number of variables; 
and provide greater data sharing. With leadership in electronic data 
collection, researchers at the Smithsonian will be able to concentrate 
more on interpretation, making the Institution even more attractive as a 
place for top scientists and for private grants. 

• Develop, implement, and monitor an efficient, effective internal 
management control program for the Institution's procurement programs 
(contracts, purchase orders, and purchase cards) and to develop and 
sustain procurement policies, training, and oversight. This will enable the 
Smithsonian to comply with the President's Management Agenda 
initiatives on Competitive Sourcing, Performance-based Service 
Contracting and E-Commerce. 

• Maintain and upgrade the Institution's communications infrastructure to 
provide reliable, cost-effective voice and data communications systems in 
support of the Smithsonian missions. 

• Meet federal requirements for timely and accurate financial information 
and improve the Institution's ability to integrate financial and performance 
management systems as part of the ERP effort. 

• Facilitate accomplishment of the Institution's mission in the most 
economic, efficient, and effective way by supporting audit, evaluation, 
investigative, contracting, and other advisory services. 

STRATEGIC GOALS AND FY 2005 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE GOALS 

Increased Public Engagement 

Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and other public programs 
(6 FTEs and $527,000) 

• Increase collaboration and cooperation within the Institution and 
with external organizations to improve exhibition planning activities 



226 



Expand a national outreach effort (9 FTEs and $744,000) 

• Establish dialogue with all Smithsonian unit and museunn directors 
to develop and expand public programs highlighting Latino 
Collections, and increase by 50% online information concerning 
Latino research, programs, and educational opportunities 

• Improve the outreach database and associated reporting structures 
so that it provides the capability for input and output from all 
outreach units in the Institution 

• Increase outreach through multiple means, from enriching 
databases and current public programs to Web-based initiatives, 
depending on audience trends and needs 

Develop and bring first-class educational resources to the nation 
(1 FTE and $137,000) 

• Design and administer visitor surveys to refine the Affiliates 
Program and develop marketing goals, strategies, and specific 
activities aimed at increasing visitorship 

Improve the stewardship of the national collections (1 1 FTEs and 
$908,000) 

• Develop an automated Smithsonian Photo Collections System in 
order to preserve and make available to the public the Institution's 
photo collections 

Strengthened Scientific Research 

Provide focus for the Institution's science resources (8 FTEs and 
$7,405,000) 

• Continue with the implementation of the Science Commission 
recommendations as endorsed by the Board of Regents 

• Develop and produce a five-year strategic plan for the four 
scientific themes as recommended by the Science Commission 

• Establish pan-Institutional research efforts that provide a broader 
scope to problems involving biodiversity, global change, and animal 
conservation 

Conduct focused scientific research programs that are recognized 
nationally and internationally (0 FTEs and $200,000) 

• Utilize remote sensing data for inclusion in GIS to understand global 
change and landscape modification in the United States, Amazon, 
central Africa, and the Far East 

• Continue using peer-reviewed proposal process to support research 
personnel and collections 

Develop the intellectual component of the collections by performing 
collections-based studies (0 FTEs and $50,000) 

• Incorporate into GIS in an environmental context the collections of 
NZP in order for researchers to consider the factors affecting the 
dynamics of an ecosystem or species 



227 



Enhanced Management Excellence 

Strengthen an Institutional culture that is customer-centered and 
results-oriented (70 FTEs and $8,488,000) 

• Guide the Smithsonian with modern business management 
techniques, provide quality legal counsel, and create a world-class 
management structure and team 

• Provide financial leadership and guidance that reflect best business 
practices and exploit modern technology, and are responsive to 
unit needs 

• Incorporate results-based assessments into the Institution's 
strategic and financial decision-making processes 

• Improve responsiveness to Institutional units, including responding 
to training needs 

• Strengthen management services in support of the Institution's 
mission including initiatives included in the President's 
Management Agenda 

• Improve the quality of the Smithsonian experience for audiences by 
identifying, for possible adoption, ten best museum and/or research 
practices 

• Establish, meet, and exceed standard tasks and time frames for 
major construction and major exhibition design and fabrication of 
projects consistent with best business practices 

• Provide state-of-the-art GIS capabilities for accessing data relevant 
to animal conservation, environmental monitoring, and landscape 
evolution that can be accessed by Smithsonian scientists and the 
public over the Internet 

Modernize the Institution's financial management systems and 
functions (25 FTEs and $2,417,000} 

• Support the implementation of the Enterprise Resource Planning 
financial modules by identifying requirements and documenting 
reengineered business practices 

• Audit and review financial management systems and functions to 
ensure the adequacy of controls and identify weaknesses 

• Conduct accounting functions for units and continue compliance 
reviews and audits 

Modernize the Institution's information technology systems and 
infrastructure (105 FTEs and $43,410,000) 

• Upgrade the Smithsonian network infrastructure to ensure that it 
will operate without interruption should there be a hardware or 
software failure or if a system component is compromised, and 
reliably identify authorized users and screen out intruders 

• Replace 25 percent of the Institution's desktop, graphics, and 
scientific workstations and printers 



228 



• Implement the budget, contracts, grants and billing, HR personnel 
processing, basic benefits, awards, unit personnel processing, 
training administration. Equal Employment Opportunity complaint 
tracking, employee relations, and labor relations modules to 
continue deployment of the Enterprise Resource Planning System 

• Replace the Smithsonian Institution Research Information System 
commercial software product with one that provides additional 
critical functionality to enhance the Institution's collections 
management capability 

• Design and implement a new Smithsonian website to make use of 
Web content management and portal functions and establish a 
Web infrastructure integrated with the security and backup 
recovery infrastructure to eliminate multiple, incompatible, and 
unsupportable Web infrastructure initiatives 

• Support the relocation of the Arts and Industries Building data 
center 

• Replace telephone systems at the Museum Support Center, 
National Zoo, Garber Center, Anacostia Museum, Smithsonian 
Marine Station, North Capital Street building, Smithsonian 
greenhouses, and for the staff now in the Arts and Industries 
Building at a new location 

• Provide-state-of-the-art databases on information related to animal 
conservation, environmental monitoring, and landscape evolution 
for inclusion in GIS 

Ensure that the Smithsonian's wor/cforce is efficient, collaborative, 
committed, and innovative (66 FTEs and $10,248,000} 

• Build a cooperative environment among all Smithsonian staff 
through increased communication and emphasizing each person's 
contribution to the Institution's special mission 

• Provide quality human resources services to a dynamic, widely 
diverse population using modern techniques and best practices 

• Implement the Workforce Restructuring Plan Institution-wide in 
order to effect organizational changes designed to streamline and 
leverage the Institution's workforce 

Recruit, hire, and retain a diverse workforce and promote equal 
opportunity (11 FTEs and $1,098,000) 

• Continue reshaping the Smithsonian workforce so that its diversity 
mirrors the applicable civilian labor force 

• Meet procurement goals negotiated with the Small Business 
Administration regarding the use of small, minority, and woman- 
owned businesses 



229 



Enhance the reputation of the Smithsonian by maintaining good 
relations with the news media and with federal, state, and local 
governments (5 FTEs and $470,000) 

• Increase contacts initiated by the Institution by 10 percent 
Complete major construction projects now underway (24 FTEs and 
$1,838,000) 

• Perform ail contract management activities tliat support major 
capital facilities projects and exhibitions, including pre-contract, 
contact negotiation, and post-contract award activities, and 
warranty and contract close-outs 

Greater Financial Strength 

Secure the financial resources needed to carry out the Institution's 
mission (3 FTEs and $475,000) 

• Annually present and justify federal budget submissions to 0MB 
and Congress 

FY 2005 REQUEST -EXPLANATION OF CHANGE 

The FY 2005 budget estimate includes a net increase of $7,668,000 
and 4 FTEs. Increases associated with necessary pay and worker's 
compensation, $1,572,000, and a decrease for communications of 
$1 51 ,000 are justified in the Non-discretionary Costs section of this budget. 
The Smithsonian is requesting program increases of $10,170,000 to provide 
additional support for the Enterprise Resource Planning System and 
improvements in network security infrastructure; establish a Web 
infrastructure and mechanism to maintain pan-Institutional Web content; 
continue four-year desktop replacement cycle; implement a pan-Institutional 
Photo Collections System; replace the Smithsonian Institution Research 
Information System (SIRIS) software and fund software license maintenance 
for the Art Collections Information System (ArtCIS); implement a Geographic 
Information System (GIS); implement and monitor additional compliance with 
President's Management Agenda initiatives, purchase card management, a 
Smithsonian-wide procurement training program, and a comprehensive 
contract career-enhancement training program. These increases are offset by 
reductions of $3,676,000 associated with the redirection of development 
costs to operations and maintenance for the ERP and $247,000 for the 
consolidation of the institution's applications servers as discussed under the 
Non-recurring Costs section of this justification. The increases are as 
follows: 

• ( -t- $3,687,000) This request shifts previous funding from system 
development to operation and maintenance for the Enterprise Resource 
Planning System for implementation of the procurement management 
system, and operations of all the ERP modules deployed through 2005. 



230 



( + $165,000) The increase is needed to upgrade the Smithsonian 
network security infrastructure to ensure that it will continue to operate 
without interruption should there be a hardware or software failure or if a 
system component is compromised, and that it can reliably identify 
authorized users and screen out intruders. 

( + $1,736,000) To eliminate multiple, incompatible, and unsupportable 
Web infrastructure initiatives, funding is requested to design and establish 
a Web and digital asset management infrastructure for the institution, 
integrate it with the security and backup recovery infrastructure, and 
make use of Web content management and portal functions. 
( + $500,000) This Increase is to establish a mechanism for producing and 
maintaining pan-Institutional Web content, developing an over-arching 
online strategy, and ensuring accountability from the numerous content 
providers dispersed throughout the Smithsonian. This increase is related 
to the Web content unit request discussed in the Communications section 
of this budget. 

( + $850,000) This increase will allow the Institution to continue a 4-year 
replacement cycle of desktop, graphics, and scientific workstations and 
printers. 

( + $756,000) An increase is requested to support the implementation of 
a pan-Institutional Photo Collections System for the Institution's 2 million 
analog and digital photographs currently managed in 1 9 different desktop 
logs. These systems are incompatible and in many cases have failed due 
to hardware and software that are no longer supported by the vendor. 
( + $1,150,000) This increase is requested to replace the Smithsonian 
Institution Research Information System commercial software product 
Horizon with a new commercial product that provides additional critical 
functionality to enhance the Institution's collections management 
capability. SIRIS currently lacks critical functionality to index and retrieve 
archive and library records with non-Roman characters, support archival 
collections management, conduct concurrent searches of multiple 
databases, and generate XML format from SIRIS records. Furthermore, 
the hardware vendor has announced that it will not support this hardware 
beyond March 2004. 

( + $81,000) An increase is requested to fund the annual software license 
maintenance costs for the Art Collections Information System (ArtCIS). 
The maintenance fees provide upgrades to the system as they are 
released. These funds will also cover patches to correct bugs in the 
system, and telephone and email support to the institution's users. 
( + $800,000) An increase of $400,000 is requested for database servers 
for a GIS to purchase a terabyte server and operating system to support 
the three GIS nodes of animal conservation, environmental monitoring, 
and landscape modification databases. Eventually each node will house 



231 



two servers that will be replaced on a two year cycle. An increase of 
$200,000 is requested to purchase academic site software licenses used 
by scientists to support a variety of GIS programs and to pay for annual 
training for scientists to stay current on developments in GIS technology. 
Additional funds of $200,000 are requested to support the cost of field 
equipment, such as global positioning satellite receivers and animal 
tracking collars, and supplies, such as storage devices and backup tapes. 

• (+$198,000, +2 FTEs) These positions will support the Institution in 
responding to three government-wide initiatives contained in the 
President's Management Agenda: competitive sourcing, performance- 
based service contracting, and e-commerce in contracting. In order to 
effectively develop, implement, and monitor compliance with these 
complex and critical programs throughout the Institution, one FTE will 
assist with the Fair Act Inventory and Competitive Sourcing program 
implementation and management, and a second FTE will assist with 
performance-based service contracting and E-commerce. 

• (-1- $1 13,000, -t- 1 FTE) To provide a contract specialist for the Office of 
Contracting, to support the expanded workload related to the Institution's 
facilities revitalization and construction project activity. 

• ( + $49,000, + 1 FTE) The purchase card program at the Smithsonian 
Institution was implemented during the last quarter of FY 2000 and 
management and oversight of the program has always been a collateral 
duty. This FTE will support the expansion in the number of purchase 
cardholders, increased number and dollar value of transactions, and 
reduce the risk of fraud and abuse that is inherent to the program. It will 
provide more effective and efficient card program maintenance, annually 
recertify cards, initiate and terminate cards, validate setup in PeopleSoft 
and confirm user access, provide help-desk assistance to cardholders and 
approving officials, and assist with training new purchase cardholders. 

• (+ $55,000) These resources are required to fund the annual 
Smithsonian-Wide Procurement Training Program. Changes in 
procurement laws and regulations and attrition of staff working in 
procurement require that a sustained, annual procurement training 
program be administered. 

• ( + $30,000) The change in the workforce, due mainly to the retirement 
of senior staff members, requires a comprehensive career-enhancement 
training program to ensure that entry-level contract specialists are 
prepared to execute ever-changing federal acquisition laws, regulations, 
and processes. 

If the FY 2005 request is not allowed, the Institution will not be able 
to meet an expanding contract award and administration workload, ensure 
that a skilled staff is available to assist in acquisition planning and to select. 



232 



negotiate, and award contracts to qualified contractors through a 
competitive process. Delays in correcting the backlog of revitalization 
requirements would result in more system failures and increase future costs; 
risks for fraud and abuse in the purchase card program will increase; and 
responses to initiatives including outsourcing programs, performance-based 
contracting, and e-commerce will be delayed. 

Additionally, the Smithsonian will be unable to replace a significant 
number of obsolete desktop workstations, resulting in more interoperability 
problems; the Institution's data networks will be vulnerable to attack, its 
applications systems and databases will be jeopardized; and information 
systems will continue to be non-compliant with federal information resources 
and Federal Information Security Management Act policies. The Institution 
will not be able to implement an automated, up-to-date photo collections 
system, without which these treasures are subject to permanent loss due to 
the fixed life span of the original photographic media. Implementation of the 
contracts module of the ERP System and replacing the commercial software 
product and hardware of the Smithsonian Institution Research Information 
System will be delayed, and lack of funding for the Art Collections 
Information System will degrade or render the system obsolete. Without 
increased funding to develop a Web infrastructure and an enterprise solution 
for content management, the Institution will continue to operate its Web 
environment with multiple, incompatible solutions, which are more costly to 
maintain. There will be no centralized mechanism for developing and 
maintaining Web content or for ensuring accountability from numerous 
content providers. 

Finally, without these requested resources, the Smithsonian's ability to 
conduct first-class scientific research will be undermined. Scientists will not 
have the tools necessary to properly analyze data they collect, nor will they 
be able to compete with scientists at other organizations for funding. This in 
turn will affect the Institution's ability to achieve the objective of providing 
the public with a broader understanding of the significance of science and 
first-class research. Management Excellence will be compromised if the 
required funds for establishing the GIS nodes and their supporting databases 
are not provided. These databases will allow Smithsonian scientists to focus 
their time on data interpretation and not data gathering, which will increase 
scientific productivity and make the Smithsonian Institution more attractive 
to top scientists and private donors. 



233 



FACILITIES MAINTENANCE 





APPLICATION OF OPERATING RESOURCES 


FEDERAL 
APPROPRIATIONS 


GENERAL 
TRUST 


DONOR/SPONSOR 
DESIGNATED 


GOV'T GRANTS 
& CONTRACTS 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FY 2003 
ESTIMATE 


220 


16,911 





418 














FY 2004 
ESTIMATE 


359 


40,615 





400 





52 








FY 2005 
ESTIMATE 


385 


49,281 





400 





16 









STRATEGIC GOALS: ENHANCED MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE 



Federal Resource Summary by Performance Objective 



Performance 
Objective 


FY 

FTE 


2004 
$000 


FY 
FTE 


2005 
$000 


Change 
FTE $000 
















Enhanced Management Excellence 














Execute an aggressive, long-range Smithsonian 
facilities program 


348 


37,060 


374 


45,706 


26 


8,646 


Ensure safety and protection of Smithsonian 
facilities, national collections, staff, visitors, and 
volunteers 


11 


3,555 


11 


3,575 





20 


Total 


359 


40,615 


385 


49,281 


26 


8,666 



BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT 

Facilities iVIaintenance focuses on facility preservation activities and 
encompasses the upkeep of property and equipment, or the work necessary 
to realize the originally anticipated useful life of a fixed asset. The Office of 
Facilities Engineering and Operations (OFEO) is responsible for maintenance 
and repair of an infrastructure consisting of more than 450 buildings and 
structures sited on 1 9,000 acres (90 acres landscaped and/or hardscape) 
utilizing 38 miles of perimeter fencing and over 1 00 lane miles of roads. 

The National Research Council (NRG) asserts that 2-4 percent of the 
aggregate replacement value of facilities in prime condition is an appropriate 
budget for routine maintenance and repair. An FY 2003 assessment by 
OFEO estimates the Smithsonian's current replacement value to be 



234 



approximately $4.4 billion. Applying the NRC criterion of 2-4 percent, the 
Smithsonian's annual requirement for routine maintenance and repair would 
be $88-$176 million. 

For FY 2005, the estimate includes a program increase of 26 FTEs and 
$8,01 2,000 to further facilities maintenance efforts and an increase of 
$654,000 for necessary pay for existing staff funded under this line item. 

MEANS AND STRATEGY 

To support the Institution's goal of Enhanced Management Excellence, 
the Office of Facilities Engineering and Operations has initiated an aggressive 
long-range Smithsonian facilities maintenance and revitalization program, 
using a Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) approach. ROM is a 
maintenance philosophy that incorporates the logical and cost-effective mix 
of predictive, proactive, preventive, and reactive maintenance practices. The 
elements of the program include the following: 

• Predictive maintenance - Vibration analysis, airborne ultrasonic analysis, 
thermographic scanning, motor-circuit analysis and radiography are a few 
of the latest technologies that will be implemented to detect impending 
failure and address causes before failure occurs. 

• Proactive approac/i - This aspect of RCM gets in front of the operating 
problems by engineering out the problem beforehand. Root Cause Failure 
analysis is essential to identify and solve long-standing reliability issues. 
Engineering adjustments driven into the design of equipment for 
installation in Smithsonian facilities is a critical area that must have focus 
for lowest life-cycle costs over time. 

• Preventive maintenance - Maintenance work in this category is cyclic or 
time-driven. Examples of this work include lubricating machinery, 
adjusting equipment tolerance, cleaning and adjusting electrical 
switchgear contacts, inspecting valves, painting, and sealing roofs. 

• Reactive maintenance - Maintenance work is responsive and includes 
routine repair and replacement of broken parts; spot repairs to roofs, 
roads, and building exteriors/interiors; repairs to broken water mains; and 
replacement of broken parts on building systems. 

• Maintenance work force - Improving the skills of the Smithsonian 
maintenance work force is essential to modernizing our maintenance 
approach. Extensive training and technology familiarization are required. 
However, because in-house maintenance forces are not adequate to fully 
care for all maintenance requirements, maintenance work that is 
infrequently needed, that requires expensive tools, or requires specialized 
equipment will most often be done by a contractor who does this work 
on a regular basis. 



235 



STRATEGIC GOALS AND FY 2005 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE GOALS 

Enhanced Management Excellence 

Execute an aggressive, long-range Smithsonian facilities program 
(374 FTES and $45,706,000) 

• Develop a maintenance organization and budget to achieve world- 
class cultural and scientific facilities 

• Benchmark with recognized world-class operation and 
maintenance organizations 

• Measure to show benefits if additional resources are available 

• Establish baseline number of customer requests for assistance 
and survey customers upon completion of each job to measure 
satisfaction with service 

• Provide clean, attractive, well-maintained facilities 

• Develop work processes and document results for 
interdepartmental offices 

• Publish comprehensive operation and maintenance handbook 

• Increase percent of proactive versus reactive maintenance work 

• Maintain or increase percent of time building temperature and 
humidity levels are within the normal band 

• Reduce the number of HVAC sensor points out of service 

• Acquire a more effective tool for creating contract packages to 
improve timely delivery of goods and services 

• Evaluate possible use of interagency contracts 
Ensure safety and protection of Smithsonian facilities, national 
collections, staff, visitors, and volunteers (11 FTEs and $3,575,000) 

• Continuously review and update safety and security policies, 
emergency preparedness plans, and Smithsonian Safety Handbook 

• Develop and execute heightened security measures using a variety 
of methods to keep staff and public informed of current safety 
issues 

• Track safety deficiencies and measure the number of days until 
corrective action is complete 

• Measure the number of crimes against the number of visitors and 
staff; and decrease the amount of property damage from crime 

• Benchmark reportable incident and lost-work-day incident rates 
against those reported by the Construction Industry Institute 

• Measure the number of vertical transportation incidents and mean 
time between elevator call backs 

• Measure the number of false alarms and service calls for fire 
protection and suppression systems 



236 



FY 2005 REQUEST-EXPLANATION OF CHANGE 

The FY 2005 budget estimate includes an increase of $8,666,000 and 
26 FTEs. Included is an increase of $654,000 for necessary pay for existing 
staff, which is justified in the Non-discretionary Costs section of this budget. 
The request includes a program increase of 26 FTEs and $8,012,000 to 
partially attain the critically needed maintenance funding level, ensure 
optimal (lowest) life-cycle costs for the current plant, and provide the 
necessary staff and funding required for full-scale maintenance of the new 
National Museum of American Indian on the Mall. The increases are as 
follows: 

• (-1- $7,600,000, +21 FTEs) This increase will provide funding for 
maintenance and administrative support staff (21 FTEs and $1,783,000) 
and contractual support ($5,817,000) to enable the Smithsonian to be in 
compliance with the National Fire Protection Agency and other life-safety 
codes; increase the percentage of time environmental conditions are 
within acceptable tolerance to 90 percent; slow down equipment failures, 
thereby reducing the risk of collateral damage to artifacts; reduce the risk 
of electrical fires and equipment outages due to motor control center 
failure; and improve the reliability and safety of elevators and escalators. 
The 21 FTEs will provide four maintenance mechanics, three HVAC 
mechanics, four engineers, two engineering technicians, two electricians, 
two plumbers, two elevator mechanics, and two program analysts. 

• ( -I- $41 2,000, -I- 5 FTEs) This increase is for salaries and benefits for three 
HVAC mechanics, one electrician and one plumber ($345,000 and 

5 FTEs), and contractual support ($67,000) required to support the new 
National Museum of the American Indian on the Mall, which is opening in 
FY 2004. 

If the FY 2005 request is not allowed, the Smithsonian will not be able 
to realize the gains from increasing reliability of equipment, reduced 
maintenance costs, and safer facilities. Artifacts will continue to be at risk to 
damage by steam trap failures that cause fast increases in humidity levels. 
The Smithsonian's effort to create more reliable mechanical equipment, 
reduced energy usage, and a better environment for the artifacts will be 
deferred. Lack of automated preventive testing and inspection processes will 
exacerbate inefficient maintenance practices and force much higher lifetime 
costs. Annual maintenance required for special equipment will not be 
performed. Maintenance of mechanical spaces will not be performed or will 
be performed inadequately. This will result in the potential for mold and 
microbe proliferation, indoor air quality problems, "Sick Building" syndrome, 
potential hazards to staff and visitors, and loss of energy. 



237 



Without additional maintenance funding, the Institution will be required 
to commit more and more revitalization funds to repair existing equipment 
and to take emergency measures for sudden failures, reducing the funds 
available for long-term repair and renovation of facilities. The fewer long-term 
systems replacements that are accomplished, the more costly short-term 
repairs will be required to existing, failing equipment. The entire revitalization 
investment will be degraded prematurely, demanding early replacement of 
new components and systems. Since many Smithsonian facilities were built 
over 25 years ago, a lack of funds could result in buildings unfit for 
occupancy, thereby forcing the Smithsonian to close buildings in part or 
entirely. Finally, without maintenance resources to support the National 
Museum of the American Indian, newly installed systems will be 
inadequately maintained. The long-term ramifications are increased risk of 
damage to collections and accelerated deterioration of the building systems 
and building structure. 



238 



FACILITIES OPERATIONS, SECURITY, AND SUPPORT 





APPLICATION OF OPERATING RESOURCES 


FEDERAL 
APPROPRIATIONS 


GENERAL 
TRUST 


DONOR/SPONSOR 
DESIGNATED 


GOV'T GRANTS 
& CONTRACTS 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FTE 


$000 


FY 2003 
ESTIMATE 


1,237 


125,170 


9 


3,190 


5 


309 








FY 2004 
ESTIMATE 


1,757 


144,220 


9 


2,963 


5 


280 








FY 2005 
ESTIMATE 


1,863 


155,392 


9 


2,953 


5 


285 









STRATEGIC GOALS: INCREASED PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT; ENHANCED 

MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE 

Federal Resource Summary by Performance Objective 



Performance 
Objective 


FY 

FTE 


2004 
$000 


FY 

FTE 


2005 
$000 


FTE 


lange 
$000 
















Increased Public Engagement: 














Offer compelling, first-class exhibitions and other 
public programs 


8 


675 


8 


689 





14 


Enhanced Management Excellence: 














Execute an aggressive, long-range Smithsonian 
facilities program 


592 


87,320 


611 


91,707 


19 


4,387 


Ensure safety and protection of Smithsonian 
facilities. National Collections, staff, visitors, and 
volunteers 


1,157 


56,225 


1,244 


62,996 


87 


6,771 


Total 


1,757 


144,220 


1,863 


155,392 


106 


11,172 



BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT 

The Facilities Operations, Security, and Support program operates, 
maintains, and secures the Smithsonian's physical infrastructure. The 
program is under the direction of the Office of Facilities Operations and 
Engineering (OFEO), whose mission is to provide and safeguard a quality- 
built environment that enables staff to increase and diffuse knowledge and 
add to the enjoyment of visitors. To achieve the Institution's goal of 
Increased Public Engagement, OFEO will improve facilities, which are 



239 



considered by the public to be world-class cultural and scientific facilities, 
through pre-defined standards. 

Facilities Operations, Security, and Support is the integration of all 
operational activities not directly related to maintaining the physical 
infrastructure of the Smithsonian. Resources within this line item support 
facilities operations, including activities such as custodial work, snow 
removal, pest control, refuse collection and disposal, grounds care and 
landscaping, environmental operations and record keeping, fire protection, 
security services, and central utility plant operations. Also included are 
facilities planning, architectural/engineering design plans and specification 
services, as well as related support services such as mail, transportation, and 
the payment of utilities and central rent. The uniform management and 
provision of these services ensures cost savings and consistency throughout 
the Smithsonian, and contributes to achieving the Institution's goal of 
Enhanced Management Excellence. 

For FY 2005, the estimate includes a net increase of 106 FTEs and 
$1 1,172,000. This amount includes increases of $3,430,000 for necessary 
pay for staff funded under this line item and $1,352,000 for utilities and 
rent, as discussed under the Non-discretionary Costs section of this budget, 
and 106 FTEs and $6,390,000 for programmatic increases. 

This request also includes, beginning in FY 2004, an increase of 49 
FTEs and $2,399,000 (increased to $2,471 ,000 in FY 2005 for the pay 
raise) to reflect the transfer of police officers at the National Zoological Park 
to this line item. This restructuring will require congressional approval of a 
reprogramming in FY 2004. The upward trend in the demand for security 
services after September 1 1, 2001, has posed significant challenges for all 
agencies, especially those with significant public exposure like the 
Smithsonian. This realignment will allow for centralized management of the 
Smithsonian's entire security workforce and allow for a common 
management structure, security policies, and consistent training. 

MEANS AND STRATEGY 

FY 2005 resources will enhance the ability of OFEO to meet its 
stewardship responsibilities by focusing efforts and resources on facilities 
operations and security. To achieve the Institution's goal of Increased Public 
Engagement, resources are used to develop exhibits and other public 
programs related to horticulture, architectural history, and historic 
preservation. 



240 



To achieve the goal of Enhanced Management Excellence, resources 
are focused on meeting the ongoing operational requirements of Smithsonian 
facilities to ensure that they continue meeting programmatic requirements. 
Additional staff support will enhance the Institution's ability to execute the 
capital program, which will allow the Smithsonian to revitalize its facilities 
over the next decade. OFEO will continue to devote resources to implement 
and upgrade security measures at Smithsonian facilities. The requested 
resources will continue to address the heightened security measures 
precipitated by the September 1 1, 2001, terrorist attacks and identified in 
the May 2002 Composite Risk Assessment report by the Office of Protection 
Services. OFEO has completed a major effort to improve service to the 
Institution by establishing management zones for Smithsonian facilities. The 
management zones will ensure rapid response to facility needs, streamline 
administrative activities, and optimize the efficiency and effectiveness of 
operations. In addition, the zone concept will offer staff a sense of 
ownership for specific facilities and significantly reduce response times by 
having staff on site. 

STRATEGIC GOALS AND FY 2005 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE GOALS 

Increased Public Engagement 

Ofler compelling, first-class exhibitions and other public programs 
(8 FTEs and $689,000) 

• Present the biennial Orchid Show in concert with the U.S. Botanic 
Garden, the National Museum of Natural History, and the National 
Zoological Park 

• Present the exhibition Adolf Kluss: From Germany to America, 
Shaping a Capital City Worthy of a Republic in conjunction with the 
City Museum of Washington, Goethe Institute, Heilbronn Archives, 
Sumner School Museum and Archives, and the National Building 
Museum 

• Present four academic lectures and tours relating to the history of 
the oldest Smithsonian facilities to increase public knowledge 

Enhanced Management Excellence 

Execute an aggressive, long-range Smithsonian facilities program 
(611 FTEs and $91,707,000) 

• Integrate facilities management and related activities across the 
Smithsonian to improve operational efficiency and effectiveness, 
cost control, quality control, and accountability 

• Develop performance metrics to document baseline standards for 
response times and quality service that are based on private sector 
standards and definitions 

• Decrease number of restroom complaints 



241 



Ensure safety and protection of Smithsonian facilities, national 
collections, staff, visitors, and volunteers (1,244 FTEs and 
$62,996,000) 

• Ensure physical security measures are in place and effective to 
include electronic screening, bag searches, internal/external patrols, 
and maintenance and replacement of electronic security controls. 
All measures are to be efficiently managed to provide an 
appropriate level of access to the national collections while 
providing optimal protection for the collections, staff, and visiting 
public 

• Provide 1 00 percent of the increased security patrols recommended 
in the security threat and vulnerability assessment for the National 
Zoological Park 

• Ensure in FY 2005 that electronic screening operations at the 
National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) are enhanced to 
eliminate or reduce the likelihood of hand-carried weapons and 
explosives being brought into the Museum 

• Update and maintain the Institution's disaster management plan 
and individual museum/facility disaster plans through programmed 
table-top disaster management exercises and emergency drills 

FY 2005 REQUEST-EXPLANATION OF CHANGE 

The FY 2005 budget estimate includes an increase of $1 1,172,000 
and 106 FTEs. This includes an increase of $3,430,000 for necessary pay 
for existing staff funded under this line item, $851 ,000 for increases in rent 
and $501,000 for inflation adjustments in utilities, which are all justified 
under the Non-discretionary Costs section of this budget. Also included is a 
program increase of 106 FTEs and $6,390,000 as follows: 

• ( + $2,067,000, -1-40 FTEs) This increase is requested in order to support 
security and operational activities at the new National Museum of the 
American Indian Mall museum, including 

• $547,000 and 8 FTEs to support custodial, horticultural, and safety 
requirements at the Mall museum 

• $1 ,520,000 and 32 FTEs to support the additional security force 
requirements for the Mail museum 

• ( + $802,000, +7 FTEs) This increase provides necessary staff support to 
the expanded facilities program. The request includes staff support costs 
of $40,000 and salaries and benefits for the following positions: 

• $21 6,000 and 2 FTEs to provide engineers for the National Zoological 
Park. These positions are required to support the expanded facilities 
workload at the Zoo. 



242 



• $546,000 and 5 FTEs to provide staff to ensure that all applicable 
regulations, codes, and policies are fully met; nnanage the planning and 
design of projects; and to provide overall project and financial 
management for the facilities modernization program. 

• ( + $500,000, +4 FTEs) This increase provides for salaries and benefits 
to complete staffing of the zone management organizational structure, in 
order to strengthen oversight and coordination within and between zones. 
The requested staff will ensure effective utilization of resources and 
consistent levels of service throughout the Smithsonian. 

• ( + $3,021,000, +55 FTEs) This increase is requested to provide 
necessary security staff and related requirements to support the increased 
security needs of the Smithsonian, including 

• $1,772,000 and 34 FTEs to support the phased hiring of 34 security 
officers to perform electronic visitor screening at NMNH ($921,000). 
The Institution will request full funding for these 34 FTEs in FY 2006. 
Also included in this request is $851 ,000 to fully fund FTEs requested 
in FY 2004 for phased hiring of security officers at the National Air 
and Space Museum (NASM) and the National Museum of American 
History (NMAH). 

• $200,000 to fund contractor costs for the management of disaster 
management drills and table-top exercises, assisting individual 
museums and the Institution as a whole to prepare to respond in the 
event of a disaster 

• $1,049,000 and 21 FTEs to allow the conversion of the National 
Postal Museum's (NPM) security services personnel, who are currently 
paid in accordance with the federal grant and contract agreement 
signed with United States Postal Service, to federal status. Approval 
of this request will eliminate perceived command inequities and 
confusion and allow NPM's security function to be managed in the 
same manner as other Institution museums/facilities, resulting in a 
more unified workforce favorably affecting NPM's security. This is 
critical in view of NPM's location near the U.S. Capitol. In addition, 
the conversion will enhance overall staff flexibility and ensure equity 
among compensation and staff, and will stabilize the NPM guard force, 
which has experienced high turnover due to guards leaving to take 
federal positions. The request includes support for salaries and 
benefits, supplies and equipment for 1 2 security guards, three control 
room operators, three sergeants, two lieutenants, one security 
manager ($1,014,000), and contract support for alarm maintenance 
($35,000). 

If the FY 2005 request is not allowed, the Institution places itself at 
considerable risk by delaying recommended and much-needed security 



243 



improvements as well as operational requirements. The Smithsonian will not 
be able to follow through with recommended measures to reduce the impact 
of security threats or terrorist activities. There will be insufficient staff to 
maintain efficient electronic screening operations at NMNH. Without the 
resources to fully fund existing security staff at NMAH and NASM and funds 
to support increased staffing at NMNH, security officers will be reassigned 
from the smaller museums, compromising security at those museums. If 
funding is not provided for disaster preparedness, the Institution's staff will 
not be prepared to respond effectively to potential disasters. Without 
additional staff for the capital program execution, delays in correcting the 
backlog of revitalization requirements would result in more system failures 
and increased future costs. If approval to convert NPM staff funding to 
federal appropriations is denied, the quality of security at NPM will be below 
the Smithsonian's minimum standards, and the NPM security force will likely 
remain understaffed due to high turnover, creating additional risk in this high- 
profile location. 



244 



FACILITIES CAPITAL 





TOTAL 


FY 2003 APPROPRIATION 


$98,779,000 


FY 2004 ESTIMATE 


$89,970,000 


FY 2005 ESTIMATE 


$215,262,000 



STRATEGIC GOAL: ENHANCED MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE 



Federal Resource Summaty by Performance Objective 



Performance 
Objective 


FY 2004 


FY 2005 


Change 


FTE 


$(000) 


FTE 


$(000) 


FTE 


$(000) 
















Enhanced Management Excellence: 














Complete major construction projects now 
underway 


10 


10,000 


6 


18,990 


-4 


8,990 


Execute an aggressive, long-range 
Smithsonian facilities program 


32 


79,970 


32 


191,372 





1 1 1 ,402 


Ensure safety and protection of Smithsonian 
facilities, national collections, staff, visitors, 
and volunteers 











4,900 





4,900 


Total 


42 


89,970 


38 


215,262 


-4 


125,292 



BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT 

The Facilities Capital program supports the Institution's exhibition, 
research, conservation, collections storage, and education programs by 
providing safe and appropriate space. In order to accomplish its mission, the 
Office of Facilities Engineering and Operations must ensure that deterioration 
in aging Smithsonian facilities is arrested, that necessary revitalization goes 
forward, and that required expansion and/or construction of new facilities 
conforms with modern building, life-safety, and environmental codes, with 
minimal disruption to Smithsonian programs, staff, and visitors. 

The professional engineering study Smithsonian Institution IVIuseums 
and Facilities: Critical Assessment and Improvement Objectives, published in 
September 2001, outlines the urgent requirement to invest $1 .5 billion in 
revitalization of Smithsonian facilities over the next decade. The National 
Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) study of July 2001 confirmed the 
magnitude of the problem. Without an aggressive and sustained program of 
revitalization, the Institution cannot continue to provide for the safety of its 



245 



visitors and staff and honor its commitment to stewardship of the artifacts 
and facilities with which it has been entrusted. Through this approach, the 
Smithsonian can move beyond today's never-ending crises of breakdown 
maintenance and declining facilities performance to embrace a more 
comprehensive and long-term stewardship of its facilities. 

MEANS AND STRATEGY 

The FY 2005 request for the capital program represents a significantly 
Increased investment in the goal of Enhanced Management Excellence. With 
funding in the capital program, the Institution will focus on improving the 
safety and security of visitors, staff, volunteers, and collections and make 
Incremental progress toward returning Smithsonian facilities to full 
functionality within the decade. 

Since the Commission on the Future of the Smithsonian Institution 
made its recommendations in 1995, $405 million in repair and restoration 
funds has been appropriated for revitalization of facilities. Although the 
investment was significant and unquestionably needed, the impact of this 
funding was lessened because of the size and scale of the Institution's nearly 
eight million square feet of facilities located in six states, the District of 
Columbia, and Panama. Today, the Smithsonian's facilities need extensive 
reinvestment if the Institution Is to continue to fulfill its missions as preserver 
of the nation's cultural heritage and a pioneer in the sciences. This 
investment will arrest the decline in facilities performance and avoid 
necessarily higher costs of ownership from: 

• Block obsolescence. More than half of the Smithsonian's buildings and 
systems are between 25 and 40 years old, effectively obsolete, and no 
longer economically maintained or repaired. 

• Age of buildings. The buildings range in age from new to over 1 60 years 
old, and many are subject to the higher costs and constraints associated 
with historic preservation. 

• High traffic. The Smithsonian receives 25-30 million visits per year. 

• Architectural variety. Addressing the repairs of these buildings requires 
expertise in everything from stone masonry to stained glass and from 
slate roofs to subterranean vaults. 

• Functional diversity. Virtually every kind of artistic, cultural, and scientific 
activity conceivable takes place in the laboratories, classrooms, galleries, 
studios, and gathering places. 

• Track record of understated need. Until recently, the scope of the repair 
and restoration needs of the Institution has not been fully quantified or 
completely communicated; the result is an extensive backlog of repairs. 



246 



• Doing more with less. Since the buyouts of 1 994 and 1 996, the 

maintenance and facilities areas of the Institution have lost 51 staff at a 
time when systems are increasingly in need of repair. 

As the "principal repository of our nation's collective memory and the 
nation's largest public cultural space," (from the Commission on the Future 
of the Smithsonian report in 1995) the Smithsonian must ensure that the 
country's most valued artifacts are maintained in perpetuity through 
preservation, research, and educational programs. However, the combined 
problems listed above and the compelling urgency for a solution results in an 
enormous budgetary problem for the relatively small Smithsonian Institution. 
Nonetheless, the challenge remains for the Institution to transform the 
physical environment of the Smithsonian over the next ten years. That duty 
demands that the Institution define its facility stewardship requirements and 
secure the means for honoring this commitment to its museums, research 
units, and the National Zoo. 

The Critical Assessment study , dated September 28, 2001, records 
the full breadth of the commitment that must be made to preserve the 
Smithsonian and position it for the 21^* century. It is a compilation of scores 
of architect-engineer consultant investigations and hundreds of internal 
condition assessments. The total repair and restoration requirements known 
at this time fall Into three major areas: 

Revitalization. To address the causes of advanced deterioration and 
resulting decline in the Institution and avoid crippling failures in building 
systems that can result in lost data and damage to collections or hazardous 
conditions for visitors and staff, the Smithsonian must spend more than 
$1 .5 billion for restoration, renovation, and modernization of its facilities. 

Routine Maintenance and Repair. To realize the intended design life 
and full economic value of its facilities and the investment in revitalization, 
the Smithsonian must increase its day-to-day facility preservation activities 
to $45 million annually. Concurrently, the method of maintenance will evolve 
into a modern, cost-effective program centered on reliability and risk 
management reinforced through qualitative standards and cost-effective 
application of technology. 

Construction. Fulfilling the Smithsonian's mission will require new 
facilities off the Mall, mainly to meet collections needs at the institution's 
Suitland, Maryland, site. 

The Facilities Capital request includes funding for Revitalization and 
Construction, and the Planning and Design needed to support these efforts. 



247 



Resources are requested in the Salaries and Expenses section of this budget 
to Improve facilities maintenance. Together, these resources, over the next 
decade, will arrest the downward spiral of deterioration and result In much 
improved quality of facilities to support Smithsonian programs. 

STRATEGIC GOALS AND FY 2005 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE GOALS 

Enhanced Management Excellence 

Complete major construction projects now underway (6 FTEs and 
$18,990,000) 

• Initiate construction and complete 80% of Pod 5 at the Museum 
Support Center 

• Oversee the breaking-in period of the National Museum of the 
American Indian Mall Museum, ensuring that all necessary 
corrective actions are taken 

Execute an aggressive, long-range Smithsonian facilities program 
(32 FTEs and $191,372,000) 

• Complete 80% of the revitalization of the Patent Office Building 

• Complete construction of Asia I project at the National Zoological 
Park 

• Initiate construction of Asia II project at the National Zoological 
Park 

• Complete 25% of the core space revitalization at the National 
Museum of American History, Behring Center 

• Complete 40% of the total revitalization of the National Museum of 
Natural History 

Ensure safety and protection of Smithsonian facilities, collections, 
staff, visitors, and volunteers ($4,900,000) 

• Complete construction of permanent security barriers for 70% of 
the Mall facilities 

• Initiate design for chemlcal/biologlcal/radiological attack mitigation 
for all facilities 

FY 2005 REQUEST 

The Institution requests $215,262,000 and 38 FTEs for the capital 
program In FY 2005, an increase of $125,292,000 over the FY 2004 
estimate and a decrease of 4 FTEs. Additional details of specific projects are 
presented below. The major components Include the following: 
• Revitalization (32 FTEs and $173,222,000) These resources will 
complete the major revitalization projects at the Patent Office Building 
(5 FTEs and $44,400,000), and the Asia Trail Phase I project at the 
National Zoological Park ($15,000,000); continue major projects at the 
National Museum of American History, Behring Center ($15,000,000) 



248 



and National Museunn of Natural History ($10,000,000); relocate staff 
and collections from the Arts and Industries Building to effect an 
emergency closure of the building due to roof failure ($26,400,000); 
initiate installation of permanent barriers and other security measures to 
make the Institution less vulnerable to terror attacks ($4,900,000); and 
make other capital repairs throughout its facilities (27 FTEs and 
$16,150,000). In addition, the Smithsonian requests consideration of two 
extraordinary issues that cannot be accommodated within the normal 
budget ceiling: accelerate construction of the Asia Trail II project to 
provide adequate and appropriate indoor and outdoor housing for the 
baby male elephant and the other elephants in the Zoo's collection 
($34,000,000); and consolidate program and administrative operations as 
part of the closure of the Arts and Industries Building ($7,372,000). The 
request represents an increase of $101 .6 million over the FY 2004 
funding level, and no change to the 32 FTEs previously provided for 
construction management staff to supervise construction contracts to 
execute the revitalization program. 

Construction (6 FTEs and $18,990,000) This amount will allow the 
Institution to complete construction of Pod 5 at the Museum Support 
Center to provide safe and secure housing for important systematic 
biology specimens preserved in alcohol (5 FTEs and $18,000,000), and 
support installation of the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope 
Array System (VERITAS) in Arizona ($990,000). The request includes an 
increase of $8,990,000 over, and a decrease of 4 FTEs from, the 
FY 2004 estimate. The reduction of FTEs is due to anticipated completion 
of the National Museum of the American Indian Mall Museum in the fall of 
2004. The Institution will retain one of the 5 FTEs originally provided for 
this project to provide construction management through the end of the 
first quarter of FY 2005. 

Facilities Planning and Design ($23,050,000) This level of funding will 
provide the capacity to conduct master-planning studies and to complete 
design of projects in the FY 2006 and FY 2007 capital program to at 
least the 35% stage, providing firm baselines and allowing timely award 
of construction contracts upon receipt of future year funding. The 
Institution plans to complete design of the Arts and Industries Building 
restoration project ($5,000,000), design the renovation of Pod 3 at the 
Museum Support Center ($1,000,000), continue design of future 
revitalization work at the National Museum of Natural History 
($3,000,000), design major revitalization projects at the National 
Zoological Park ($6,000,000) and update the Zoo's Rock Creek Master 
Plan ($2,000,000), and complete design of a number of smaller projects 
($6,050,000). The request is a $14.8 million increase over FY 2004, and 
will allow the Institution to maintain momentum in modernizing its 
facilities over the next decade. 



249 



Without these resources, the Institution will fall far behind in nneeting 
several key components of its goal to achieve enhanced managennent 
excellence. Further delay in revitalizing the Smithsonian's physical 
infrastructure and providing appropriate storage for alcohol-preserved 
specimens will exacerbate an already dire situation that places the Institution 
at risk of defaulting on its stewardship responsibilities for the artifacts and 
facilities with which it has been entrusted. 

FACILITIES CAPITAL DETAIL AND OUTYEAR REQUIREMENTS 

The chart that follows summarizes the Institution's request for the 
highest priority projects for FY 2005, and the related future program 
requirements through FY 2009. The highest priority projects typically 
include: 

• Work needed to correct hazardous conditions that pose a serious threat 
to public or employee safety or health, or are required to meet mandated 
life-safety or health codes 

• Repair or replacement of building shell or utility components or systems 
experiencing active failures, such as roof or facade leaks or HVAC or 
electrical equipment breakdowns that pose an immediate risk of damage 
to the collections or major disruption of program activities 

• Fire and life-safety, accessibility, and security modifications that are 
required to meet life-safety or health codes within an established 
timeframe 

• Repair or replacement of building shell or utility components or systems 
that are in imminent danger of failure, such as minor roof leaks or 
electrical equipment that require more frequent than normal maintenance, 
or HVAC systems whose components are failing at an increasing rate 

• Predicted renewal requirements, based on normal life span and observable 
condition of building shells and systems 

In determining the priorities and scheduling, the staff considers other 
factors that influence how and when projects might be accomplished, 
including the potential for disrupting the visiting public and the extent to 
which work of differing priorities should be undertaken at the same time in a 
particular building in order to take advantage of better pricing. The 
availability of space in which to relocate staff and collections that would be 
at risk while the work is performed also affects the timing of projects. 

The project summaries that follow describe the planned components 
of FY 2005 request and are organized in three groupings with separate 
formats. Major revitalization projects— those exceeding $5 million— are 



250 



presented in greater detailand include narratives on project description, 
justification, and impact of delay. Smaller revitalization projects — in the range 
of $500,000 to $5 million — are presented with a succinct project description 
only. Projects under $500,000 are consolidated under a Miscellaneous 
Projects heading within the Other Revitalization Projects category. 

The Institution contracts for most capital program projects unless it is 
more cost effective to use existing employees or to hire temporary staff to 
accomplish the work. In FY 2003, 30 FTEs were shifted from the Salaries & 
Expenses account to the Facilities Capital account for the construction 
management staff, including 6 for the National Zoo, 1 9 for revitalization 
projects, and 5 for construction projects. Two additional FTEs were provided 
in FY 2003 and 5 in FY 2004 for construction management of revitalization 
projects, and 5 FTEs have been requested in FY 2004 for construction of 
Pod 5. The Facilities Capital account provides funds for additional expenses 
required to accomplish the proposed projects, such as security requirements 
or relocation of staff and collections that might be placed at risk during 
construction. 



251 



SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION 

Facilities Capital Program 

FY 2005 - FY 2009 





Kecafmd 


Received 


Received 


Received 


Esimm 


0MB 


Ftiture Pmgrem Based on FY 2005 Budget ^ [ 


CATEGORY 












Reipj9a 








1 


Prior 


FY 2001 


FY 2002 


FY 2003 


FY20ai 


FY 2005 


FY 2006 


FY 2007 


FY200S 


FY200S 


Oaryetn 


FtEVfTAUZATION 
























Major Projects 
























Arts & Industries Building 


3.2 


4.0 


6.0 






26.4 




30.0 


39.0 


39.0 


74.0 


Freer Gallery 






















10.0 


Hirshhom Museum 






















20.0 


Museum Support Center 
















10.0 






20.0 


National Air and Space Museum 






















55.0 


National Museum of American History 


1 .4 ' 








3.5 


15.0 


23.0 


3.5 






45.0 


National Museum of Natural History 


65.7 


10.7 


12.0 


10.0 


3.0 


10.0 


41.0 


30.0 


25.0 


34.0 


41.0 


National Zoological Park 


4.1 


4.2 


4.9 


7.0 


9.0 


15.0 


46.0 


40.0 


35.0 


30.0 


39.0 


Patent Office Building 


16.6 


17.0 


15.0 


25.0 


48.0 


44.4 












Quadrangle 






















56.0 


Renwick Gallery 






















23.0 


Silver Hill Facility 






















21.0 


Smithsonian Castle 


0.5 


0.5 


















75.0 


Anti-Terrorism Protection 












4.9 


11.0 


6.1 


2.2 


7.8 


6.6 


Other RevjtaSzation Projects 




21.1 


30.0 


32.1 


8.2 


16.2 


28.7 


23.6 


33.0 


30.7 


ONGOING 


SUBTOTAL 


91.5 


57.5 


67.9 


74.1 


71.7 


131.9 


149.7 


143.2 


134.2 


141.5 


4S5.6 


CONSTRUCTION 
























NMAI Mall Museum 


73.3 




30.0 


15.9 
















NMNH, Museum Support Center Pod 5 










10.0 


18.0 












SAO, VERITAS, Control Building 












1.0 












SAO, Hilo Base Building 




4.5 




















NZP, American Agriculture Exfiibit 




5.0 




















SUBTOTAL 


73.3 


9.5 


30.0 


15.9 


10.0 


19.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


ONGOING 


FACIUTIES PLANNING & DESIGN 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


8.8 


8.3 


23.0 


11.3 


12.9 


18.0 


16.3 


ONGOING 


SUBTOTAL 


164.8 


67.0 


97.9 


98.8 


90.0 


173.9 


161.0 


156.1 


152.2 


157.8 


ONGOING 



■ABOVE-THE-UNE- REQUESTS 

National Zoological Park, Asia Trail II 
Consolidate A&l Staff & Collections 

SUBTOTAL 












34.0 

7.4 

41.4 













TOTAL REQUEST 



164.8 



67.0 



97.9 



98.8 



90.0 



215.3 



161.0 



156.1 



152.2 



157.8 



' Fmal increment of the HVAC replacement proiect completed in ttie late 1 990s- 

The outyear program is based on the FY 2005 budget request a.nd does not reflect ttie fuH requffement as described in Smithsonian Institution Museums and Facilities: 
Critical Assessment . based on NAPA's 2001 repoa, which recommended funding in the range of S200 - 250 million annually throughout trie planning period in order to 
complete trie required work within a decade. 



252 



SUMMARY TABLES AND PROJECT SHEETS 
REVITAUZATION 

Major Projects 

This category provides funds for the cyclical replacement of major 
building systems and equipment and major renovation projects required for 
the preservation of the buildings, costing over $5 million. It primarily 
addresses the major replacement requirements for HVAC, electrical, and 
other utility systems at the older buildings where systems are nearing the 
end of their service lives. Work also encompasses modifications to ensure 
compliance with life-safety and ADA codes, restore historic features, and 
modernize the buildings to support current program requirements. 

Facility Project $(000) 

Patent Office Building Restore Patent Office Building 44,400 

National Zoological Park Asia Trail I 15,000 

National Museum of American Revitalize NMAH, BC Public 15,000 

History, Behring Center Space 

National Museum of Natural Continue Revitalization 1 0,000 

History 

Arts and Industries Building Close Building and Relocate Staff 26,400 

and Collections 

Mall Facilities Construct/Install Anti-Terrorism 4,900 

Protection 

SUBTOTAL 115,700 

"Above-the-Line" Requests: 

National Zoological Park Asia Trail II: Elephants 34,000 

Arts and Industries Building Consolidate Staff and Collections 7,372 

SUBTOTAL 41,372 

TOTAL 157,072' 

^This total includes funding for Major Revitalization projects, including "Above-the-Line" 
requests. It does not include funding for Other Revitalization projects ($16.2 million). 



253 



PROJECT TITLE: Restore Patent Office Building 
INSTALLATION: Patent Office Building 
LOCATION: Washington DC 

FY 2005 COST ESTIMATE (Thousands of Dollars): 44,400 

PRIOR YEAR FUNDING : 

Construction 97,468 

Facility Planning and Design 14,741 

Relocation Expenses 9,440 

121,649 121,649 

Total 1 66,049 

BUILDING BACKGROUND : 

Originally designed to highlight America's great spirit of invention, this 
stone neoclassical structure is a National Historic Landmark designed by 
architects Robert Mills and Thomas U. Walter. Begun in 1836 to house the 
U.S. Patent Office and completed in 1867, the building was converted to 
museum use in 1964. 

Located within this 332,000-square-foot building are the National 
Portrait Gallery, which celebrates major figures in American history and 
culture, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, dedicated to the arts 
and artists of the United States from colonial times to the present. Average 
annual visitation for both museums prior to closure was 430,000. Projected 
annual visitation to the renewed landmark is two million. 

PROJECT JUSTIFICATION : 

The building's mechanical and electrical systems are more than 30 
years old and break down frequently. The inefficient two-pipe heating, 
ventilation, and air conditioning system cannot meet the current heating and 
cooling loads in the building. Air circulation is insufficient, humidity control is 
limited, and condensation is a major problem. The cooling tower leaks and 
the chiller plant contains chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), which must be phased 
out to meet environmental laws. 

The electrical distribution system is overloaded, inadequate, and 
unsafe. Clearances around transformers do not meet current code 
requirements. Switchgear, panel boards, and distribution networks are 
deteriorated and obsolete. Replacement parts are no longer available. 

Other utility systems that are seriously deteriorated include fire 
protection, plumbing, steam distribution, and communications systems. 
Some of the fire alarm system wiring is original to the building and 



254 



contributes to system malfunctions. The building's elevators break down 
frequently, thereby reducing public access. The building's facade has been 
damaged by acid rain and air pollution, the window frames are deteriorated 
and failing, and several interior surfaces have been severely damaged by 
leaks and condensation. The building's main entrances and most restrooms 
are not accessible to persons with disabilities and do not meet current codes 
and standards. Asbestos, present throughout the building, must be abated 
before repairs can be accomplished. 

PROJECT DESCRIPTION : 

Create an accessible main entrance and improve accessibility 
throughout the building. Replace mechanical and electrical equipment, 
including boilers, pipes, air handling units, chillers, pumps, electrical 
transformers and substations, and fire pumps with new energy-efficient 
equipment. Install a new air distribution and control system, supply and 
return air grilles, and temperature and humidity controls by zone. Replace the 
cooling tower and change the location and mounting configuration to 
eliminate leaks. Repair exterior masonry, replace windows, restore elevators, 
and improve functionality of the building by providing accessible restrooms 
adjacent to each lobby and in event spaces. Remove or abate hazardous 
materials such as asbestos and CFCs. Convert administrative space to public 
space. Relocate some mechanical and electrical equipment to new space 
beneath the courtyard so that the adjacent space can be used for public 
programming, including a 346-seat auditorium. Restore interior finishes after 
installation of new systems and other construction. 

The Institution also plans to construct a glass enclosure over the 
building's courtyard, a catering kitchen for foodservice, a visible art 
conservation laboratory and a museum store. This work will occur 
concurrently, but will be funded from private sources. 

In FY 2003, the Institution awarded a contract to begin the restoration 
of the building. The base bid, in the amount of $22 million, is for courtyard 
excavation, basement and 4^^-floor mechanical equipment, system rough-in 
of all floors, and elevator installation. The full cost of the contract and 
associated supervision and contingencies is $1 17.4 million. However, this 
work does not allow for segmentation or phasing, as all systems must be 
installed to return the building to full operability. Since the funds available in 
FY 2003 and requested in FY 2004 will not be sufficient to complete 
identifiable segments of the work, the Institution is using a multi-year 
contract authority in order to complete the project on schedule. Authorization 
allowing the Smithsonian to enter into these multi-year contracts was 
recently signed into law. In a multi-year contract, the total contract is 
awarded at one time, with a commitment to the current year's funding. The 



255 



contract contains language limiting tlie extent of government liability 
contingent on future funding. Without this authority, full funding would be 
required for the entire $1 17.4 million remaining cost. This amount would 
consume a disproportionate share of Smithsonian resources, and would 
cripple other programs. With a multi-year contract, the Institution can 
complete construction 3 years from the time of contract award, to meet the 
current schedule. 

The $44.4 million requested in FY 2005 will complete the funding 
required for the revitalization contract and necessary construction 
supervision and contingencies. 

PROGRESS TO DATE : 

Facility assessment and planning phases have been completed and the 
roof and gutters have been replaced. The $9.3 million gross demolition 
package in support of the physical plant renewal of the Patent Office 
Building was completed in November 2002. An $8.6 million contract for the 
exterior stone and window renovation portion of the project is currently 84 
percent complete. Additionally, the $4 million contract for the packing, 
crating, relocation, and storage of SAAM and NPG collections material is 
complete. 

The main construction package, to revitalize the interior of the 
building, was awarded on April 10, 2003, and the original Notice to Proceed 
was issued on April 17, 2003. Following a May 7, 2003, stop-work notice, 
the Notice to Proceed was issued May 30, 2003. Final completion of 
construction is anticipated in March 2006, following a 34-month 
construction process. The planned opening date is July 4, 2006. Historic 
Preservation processes are ongoing, with the Smithsonian as lead agency 
and the National Capital Planning Commission as a cooperating agency. The 
Smithsonian followed the intent of the National Environmental Policy Act 
process and, following the August 2002 public and governmental agency 
review, the completed Environmental Assessment and Finding of No 
Significant Impact was approved on February 1 8, 2003, 

Current funding and 5 FTEs transferred from Salaries and Expenses in 
FY 2003 are being used to hire construction management staff to supervise 
the construction contracts. 

IMPACT OF DELAY: 

The POB renovation project has been underway since May 2003. A 
delay of this final increment of funding would extend the construction time 
as well as increase the overall construction costs of the project. The building 
has been closed to the public, including school groups, educators, and 



256 



scholars, since January 2000 for the renovation and will remain so until 
sufficient funding is received to complete the entire project. This diminishes 
access to the museums' collections and reduces the Smithsonian's visibility 
and consequently its ability to attract donors. Also, the separation of staff 
from their collections causes inefficiency and inconvenience in collections 
management and research. 



257 



PROJECT TITLE: Asia Trail I (formerly Renovate Deer & Tapir Area) 
INSTALLATION: National Zoological Park 
LOCATION: Washington DC 

FY 2005 COST ESTIMATE (Thousands of Dollars): 15,000 

PRIOR YEAR FUNDING : 

Facility Planning and Design 4,700 

Demolition and site work 3,500 

Construction 9,000 

17,200 17,200 

Total 32,200 

BUILDING/SITE BACKGROUND: 

The National Zoological Park in Washington DC, a National Historic 
District, was designed in the 1890s by the firm of renowned landscape 
architect Frederick Law Olmsted and architect Williams Ralph Emerson. The 
Byzantine-style Reptile House and Renaissance-style Elephant House 
exemplify the tradition of architect-designed buildings at the Zoo. Visitors to 
the Zoo in Washington can find more than 2,800 animals of nearly 440 
species on exhibit in naturalistic settings. The Zoo's purpose is to promote 
the conservation of life on Earth through inspiration, recreation, informal and 
formal education, research, and animal health programs that support the care 
of its unique collection of living animals. 

PROJECT JUSTIFICATION : 

Buildings at the Zoo vary in condition from good to failing, and over 
half have seriously compromised structural, mechanical, electrical, and fire 
and life-safety systems. Among the facility areas with serious deficiencies 
are the Bear Exhibit, Deer/Tapir Area, Elephant House, Seal/Sea Lion Exhibit, 
and Property Yard. Six other buildings are in poor condition and barely meet 
a minimum acceptable performance level. Additional deficiencies throughout 
the Zoo include antiquated and inadequate utility service and distribution 
systems, obsolete fire alarm and smoke detection systems, practically 
nonexistent central monitoring of animal life support systems (such as water 
treatment), deteriorated roadways and bridges, and inadequate space for 
several of the Zoo's largest mammals. 

In March 2003, the American Zoo and Aquarium Association (AZA) 
delayed the Zoo's 5-year accreditation application pending continued 
progress on a number of major concerns over the next year, including making 
progress on a "tremendous amount of deferred maintenance." The AZA 
recognized the increased support in recent years for capital improvements at 



258 



the Zoo, but expressed concern that additional steps be taken to ensure that 
the improvements continue. The AZA, as well as the Commission of Fine 
Arts, noted that the Zoo lacks a current master plan. 

In 2000, a concept master plan for Zoo Renewal was developed to 
address the Zoo's oldest failing facilities (affirmed by the NAPA study) which 
put the animals at risk. The Renewal Plan reorganizes and rebuilds the Zoo, 
grouping animals by their natural geographic locations. Both the AZA and the 
United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) have encouraged the Zoo to 
expand its animal enrichment program, which includes providing features in 
exhibits that encourage natural animal behavior (plants, pools, shade), and 
which is possible only with additional funds for exhibit improvements. In 
FY 2004, the Zoo will begin a comprehensive update of the Rock Creek 
Master Plan as part of its overall strategic planning for integrated exhibition, 
collections, and facilities. The Master Plan will provide more accurate 
information on the areas to be renovated, the appropriate sequence of 
construction, and the likely magnitude of costs for each component. 

The Asia Trail I project will replace a number of outdated animal 
habitats such as the sloth bear exhibit built in the late 1890s, and will 
address significant failing areas of the Zoo by providing complete ADA 
access, enhanced visitor experiences, and the replacement of obsolete and 
inadequate infrastructure systems with code compliant mechanical, 
electrical, plumbing, and drainage systems. 

PROJECT DESCRIPTION : 

The Asia Trail I project includes the renovation and reorganization of a 
22-acre site at the Zoo to create a compelling Asian-themed path from the 
new Sloth Bear exhibit at the main entrance to the renovated and expanded 
Panda House. The project will feature many of the Zoo's most charismatic 
"stars" in a cohesive immersion experience: sloth bears, clouded leopards, 
fishing cats, red pandas, Japanese giant salamanders, and giant pandas. Asia 
Trail will include state-of-the-art interpretive displays to connect the visitor's 
on-site experience with current research and conservation efforts at the 
National Zoo, including its Front Royal facility and in the field, to reinforce 
the importance of ecology and habitat conservation. The project will replace 
currently deteriorated animal facilities as well as replace severely inadequate 
site utilities. The work includes new water service to permit installation of 
fire suppression systems and meet the needs of the animals, improved sewer 
and storm water management, new gas service, new security systems, a 
new fiber-optic communications backbone, and installation of new public 
walkways that meet ADA guidelines. 



259 



Existing holding buildings will be replaced with new structures to meet 
current USDA and AZA animal containment regulations. Holding buildings are 
designed for energy efficiency and fire suppression systems will reduce the 
hazard to the animal collection. With funding requested through FY 2005 
totaling $32.2 million and private (FONZ) funds of $6.7 million, the full 
estimate of $38.9 million will allow occupancy of the Asia Trail I area in April 
2005. 

One-half of the $7 million appropriated in FY 2003 for renovation of 
the Deer and Tapir area (now called Asia Trail I) will provide for site work 
(including earthmoving and utilities placement). The balance of the FY 2003 
funding will begin Asia Trail II design, in order to be ready to start 
construction with funding requested for FY 2005. The FY 2004 request of 
$9 million will be used for constructing Asia Trail I, along with $6.5 million 
to be provided by FONZ fundraising. The $15 million requested for FY 2005 
will complete Asia Trail I. 

PROGRESS TO DATE : 

Program requirements have been developed in house, and design is 
95% complete. The Institution plans to begin site work in fall 2003 using 
funds provided in FY 2003. 

IMPACT OF DELAY : 

The Asia Trail project replaces some of the most seriously deteriorated 
spaces at the National Zoo with revitalized infrastructure and new animal 
exhibits. Failure to fund this increment of the project will leave living animals 
in their currently inadequate housing for additional time, putting the Zoo at 
risk of failing a USDA inspection. Nearly 25% of the Zoo, including areas 
adjacent to the main entrance and Olmsted Walk, the main thoroughfare, 
would be left in an unsightly partial-construction state. This would also 
create a negative impression for the more than 2 million Zoo visitors, as well 
as environmental, safety, and security hazards typical of unattended or 
inactive construction sites. Additionally, delayed implementation of this 
portion of the work will lead to higher costs for this project due to escalation 
and the significant cost of stopping and restarting a project in progress, as 
well as adding costs to future projects that cannot start until Asia Trail is 
complete. 

A delay would undermine the Zoo's ability to improve the quality of 
life for a number of Asian animals, placing its collections at risk. Deferral of 
this phase will ultimately ripple into detrimental delays in subsequent phases 
of this project and future related projects intended to bring the housing of 
large mammals into compliance with USDA and AZA standards. 



260 



PROJECT TITLE: Revitalize NMAH, Behring Center Public Space 
INSTALLATION: National Museum of American History, Behring Center 
LOCATION: Washington DC 

FY 2005 COST ESTIMATE (Thousands of Dollars): 

Construction in Central Core 15,000 



PRIOR YEAR FUNDING: 



Design 






4,000 


Replace fire detection system 


2,500 


Relocate and improve 


core 


area 




rest rooms 






1,000 
7,500 


FUTURE YEAR FUNDING 








(FY 2006-2011): 









7,500 



Completion construction in central core 

and west wing of building 23,000 

Building perimeter renewal 3,500 

26,500 26,500 

Total 49,000 

BUILDING BACKGROUND: 

The National Museum of American History, Behring Center is a modern 
classical building designed by Walker O. Cain of McKim, Mead, and White, 
and built in 1964 as the Museum of History and Technology. The 752,000- 
square-foot building houses exhibitions that explore America's technological, 
scientific, cultural, and political history. The collections include the Star- 
Spangled Banner that inspired Francis Scott Key and exhibitions on the 
American presidency and the First Ladies' gowns. The annual visitation has 
ranged from 4-6 million. 

The $80 million gift from the Behring Foundation will allow the 
Museum to develop a series of thematic halls highlighting important aspects 
of American history and accomplishment. In 2002, the Blue Ribbon 
Commission recommended in Its report to the Smithsonian Board of Regents 
that the Museum improve the architectural and aesthetic setting for exhibits, 
improve visitors' substantive orientation, ensure appropriate balance of 
exhibit themes and content, increase the Museum's reach, and enhance the 
prospect of effective implementation. In FY 2003, NMAH will develop a set 
of exhibition goals, outreach objectives, and collecting plans, along with the 



261 



design of a dramatic new public space revitalization, which will affect all 
three main exhibit floors totaling approximately 330,000 gross square feet. 

PROJECT JUSTIFICATION: 

The fire-detection and alarm system is outdated and requires 
excessive maintenance. The public rest rooms are outdated, do not meet 
code in fixture quantity, and are not fully accessible. In some areas, notably 
the second floor, the rest rooms are difficult for visitors to locate. Public 
circulation areas, amenities, lobbies, seating, telephones and secure coat- 
check facilities are worn and in disrepair. The elevators are not fully 
accessible and are not all on emergency power. The escalators are reaching 
the end of their useful life. Paths of emergency egress are not clearly 
defined, creating life-safety hazards for the public and staff. Fire-separation 
doors are a life-safety hazard and require excessive maintenance. Areas of 
rescue assistance are needed for persons with disabilities. Deficiencies in the 
mechanical system have caused extreme variations in building humidity. 
Steam-condensate piping and pressure reducing valve stations are in poor 
condition, and transformer vaults are not air conditioned, threatening power 
failures due to heat. Leaks from the mechanical system require constant 
maintenance and threaten irreparable moisture damage to the Museum 
collections. Site landscaping, hardscape, and special features, such as the 
west reflecting pool, are in disrepair, are safety hazards, and need renewal. 
In addition, the Museum lacks perimeter security barriers against terrorist 
attacks as well as a good screening system for visitors and vehicles. 

PROJECT DESCRIPTION: 

Replace the building's fire-alarm system with a new addressable fire 
detection and alarm system with expansion capacity. Relocate and expand 
the public restrooms to meet code requirements for accessibility and fixture 
count and the actual needs of visitors and special events. Restore public 
circulation and orientation areas. Upgrade elevators and escalators so they 
are safe, accessible, and in coordination with planned security improvements 
and the public space renewal. Provide capability for each elevator to operate 
on emergency power, and vertical transport between the first and second 
floors. Restore public paths of egress to emergency stairs and provide areas 
of rescue assistance. Re-engineer the life-safety strategy to eliminate 
deficient fire-separation doors. Improve Museum lighting and sound on the 
main public floors. Provide a new power-distribution system and correct the 
mechanical system, including air conditioning in the transformer vaults. 
Repair and refurbish site landscaping, paving, and original fountains. 
Construct a new pavilion at the south entrance on the Mall, to be funded 
through private sources. 



262 



All of the major revitalization work must be performed in conjunction 
with the Museum's plan to modernize its public programs. Implementation 
will therefore be phased to coincide with the exhibit renewal program. 
Completion of revitalization work in the east and central areas of the building 
is critical in FY 2004 and FY 2005, as they are predecessors of donor- 
funded activities. The Behring-funded Price of Freedom exhibition is 
scheduled to open in November 2004, and the Star-Spangled Banner 
reinstallation and For Which It Stands exhibition are scheduled to open in 
June 2006. The Behring-funded Introductory Exhibit is scheduled to open in 
November 2006. These initiatives will be impacted without the timely 
construction of core visitor area amenities and support systems. 

The Institution requests $15 million in FY 2005 to begin construction 
in the central core of the building, including expanding the new addressable 
fire-detection and alarm system throughout the building; relocating and 
expanding the public restrooms to meet code requirements for accessibility 
with the proper fixture count for visitors and special events; restoring public 
circulation and orientation areas; upgrading elevators and escalators so they 
are safe, accessible, and in coordination with the public space renewal 
security improvements; restoring public paths of egress to emergency stairs 
and provision of areas of rescue assistance; re-engineering the life-safety 
strategy to eliminate deficient fire-separation doors; and correcting the 
mechanical system deficiencies that have caused extreme variations in the 
building humidity. The Smithsonian plans to request funding in future years 
to complete revitalization of the west wing of the building and the building 
perimeter work. 

PROGRESS TO DATE: 



The Concept Plan of this effort was completed in December 2002. 
The $3.5 million request for FY 2004 will fund core systems on the east 
wing of the building, including upgrading escalators; upgrading fire detection 
and the alarm system at the Network Command Center; renewal of the 2"'* 
and 3'" floor public restrooms; rescue assistance areas; and correcting life- 
safety/fire-protection deficiencies. Design for this package started in June 
2003 and 35% completion is expected by December 2003. Construction will 
start in March 2004 (design-build work will start after review and approval of 
the 35% document), with funding expected in FY 2004, to allow the Price of 
Freedom exhibit to open as scheduled in November 2004. The Smithsonian 
plans to award remaining design work upon receipt of the FY 2004 
appropriation to be ready to begin construction in the central core area in 
FY 2005. 



263 



IMPACT OF DELAY: 

A deferral of the work planned for FY 2005 would delay the opening 
of the Behring-funded Introductory Exhibit as well as the For Whicti It Stands 
exhibit and the Star-Spangled Banner reinstallation. Failure to open these 
exhibits in 2006 as planned would constitute a breach of the contract with 
the donor, leaving future installments of the donation at risk and damaging 
the credibility of the Institution with other potential donors. Potential system 
failures such as elevators, escalators, and incomplete coverage of fire- 
protection and life-safety standards will pose threats to the safety of 
Museum visitors, staff, and collections. Equipment and systems at the end of 
their useful life will continue to fail at increasing rates, be more expensive to 
fix later, and demand excessive amounts of maintenance staff time. 



264 



PROJECT TITLE: Continue Revitalization 
INSTALLATION: National Museunn of Natural History 
LOCATION: Washington DC 

FY 2005 COST ESTIMATE (Thousands of Dollars): 

Construction, Phase i of Permanent Exhibit Hails 
and Temporary Exhibits Space 10,000 * 

* Does not include $3 million in FY 2005 request for Facilities Planning and Design to continue design of future 
work 

PRIOR YEAR FUNDING: 



Construction 


89,089 


Facility Planning and Design 


10,968 


Move 


350 


Interim Repair 


1,000 



101,407 101,407 

FUTURE YEAR FUNDING 
(FY 2006-FY 2011) 

Ongoing HVAC replacement and code 
Improvements 171,000 ** 

** Does not include future requests for Facilities Planning and Design to complete design of revitalization project 

Total 282,407 

BUILDING BACKGROUND: 

The Natural History Building opened to the public in 1910. The East 
and West Wings were added in the early 1 960s. Two infill buildings were 
constructed in the original building's East and West courtyards in the late 
1 990s. The gross interior square footage of the building is 1 .3 million square 
feet. The building includes 300,000 square feet of public museum space, 
and collections, laboratory, office, and building services space constitute the 
remaining 1 million square feet. The Museum typically hosts 9 million visitors 
annually, making it one of the most visited museums in the world. In 1 997, 
Kenneth E. Behring donated $20 million to the Museum for several projects, 
including the rotunda renovation, two education programs, and a new 
Mammal Hall. 

PROJECT JUSTIFICATION : 

The building's mechanical and electrical systems installed in the early 
1 960s are almost 40 years old and are in need of major renovation. 
Breakdowns of the mechanical system are frequent, repair parts are often 
difficult to procure, and the system does not provide the environmental 
quality necessary for the display and curation of Museum collections. 



265 



The $10 million requested for FY 2005 will allow completion of the 
first phase of the two-phased renovation project to improve visitor circulation 
and restore Halls 7, 8, 9, and 10, and HVAC-related renovations to Halls 23, 
24, and 25 (Temporary Exhibits Space). The project's scope will include 
demolition of halls, installation of HVAC and other utilities, relocation and 
replacement of escalators, and restoration of the halls. 

The full renovation of Halls 13-1 6 is 90% complete and set for 
reopening in November 2003. The three federally funded projects, totaling 
over $12 million (HVAC Renovation, Skylight/Attic Renovation, and Laylight 
Renovation) were coupled with the more than $18 million of the Behring gift 
for design, fabrication, and installation of the new Mammals Exhibit. 

PROJECT DESCRIPTION : 

Based on the master implementation plan completed in 1 987, the 
Institution is in the midst of a comprehensive renovation program in the 
National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) building that will replace the 
HVAC equipment, ductwork, electrical equipment and wiring, piping 
systems, and the roof and windows of the main building. Asbestos and lead 
will be abated or encapsulated; the fire-protection, communications, alarm, 
and emergency power systems will be upgraded; and storm-water systems 
and a hazardous-chemical control facility will be installed. The estimated 
total cost of the renovation of NMNH is $282 million (not including future 
planning and design costs). To date, $98.4 million has been provided, and 
$3 million is expected in P/ 2004. 

PROGRESS TO DATE : 

Renovation of the building and replacement of the mechanical, 
electrical and other systems continues. Replacement of the roof and repair of 
the facade and skylights is approximately 98% complete and on schedule for 
a late summer 2003 completion. Installation of mechanical and electrical 
systems for the East and West wings and renovation of the East Wing 4^ 
and 5* floors is substantially complete. Phase VI of the renovation and 
emergency power modification work is about 60% complete. The Phase IIC 
HVAC project for the 6* Floor West Wing and 3"^ Floor Main Building is to be 
awarded in late 2003. A major design is underway for the FY 2004-2007 
renovation of Halls 7, 8, 9, 10 and 23, 24, 25 for a future exhibit, including 
several options such as an Oceans Exhibit. Demolition of Halls 9, 23, 24, 
and 25 will begin when the halls are closed in June 2004 for object removal. 
Halls 7, 8, and 10 will be closed In September 2004 for object removal and 
demolition. 



266 



IMPACT OF DELAY : 

If funding were delayed, building systems would continue to 
deteriorate and fail, and visitors would increasingly find circulation more 
difficult. The environmental conditions required for the Museum's collections 
and the visiting public could not be maintained. In addition, the Museum's 
exhibit re-installation program would not be able to proceed according to the 
planned schedule, causing the continued prolonged closure of several 
important exhibition areas to the public. 



267 



PROJECT TITLE: Close and Relocate/Consolidate Staff and Collections 
INSTALLATION: Arts and Industries Building (AIB) 
LOCATION: Washington DC 

FY 2005 COST ESTIMATE (Thousands of Dollars): 
Relocate Staff and Collections 26,400 

Consolidate the Office of the Chief 
Information Officer and the Smithsonian 
Institution Archives 7,372 * 

33,772 33,772 

* These funds are requested as an extraordinary one-time increase over normal funding levels in the capital program 

PRIOR YEAR FUNDING : 

FUTURE YEAR FUNDING 

(FY 2006-FY 2011) 



Total 33,772** 

** Does not include a pre-35% design estimate of $182 million required to restore the building, funds already 
provided for design of the restoration ($13.2 million), or funds included in the FY 2005 request for Facilities 
Planning and Design to complete design of the restoration project ($5 million). 

BUILDING BACKGROUND: 

Designed to house the rapidly growing National Museum, the 
1 98,000-gross-square-foot Arts and Industries Building (AIB) was started in 
April 1879 and completed in March 1881. Built to house the U.S. National 
Museum, including objects given to the Smithsonian after the 1876 
Centennial Exposition, the building presently houses temporary and traveling 
exhibitions, public facilities, administrative offices, the Discovery Theater for 
children, and the Smithsonian's daycare center for infants and toddlers. The 
Smithsonian Institution Archives (SIA), including the papers of the first 
Secretary, Joseph Henry, the central Office of the Chief Information Officer 
(OCIO), and the headquarters of the Smithsonian Office of Protection 
Services (OPS) are the largest tenants of the building. About 430 
Smithsonian employees occupy the building. One recent temporary exhibit 
was the popular Orchid and Butterfly Garden. Average annual visitation is 
approximately 900,000. 

PROJECT JUSTIFICATION : 

The building's current condition is very poor. Despite ongoing 
maintenance, roof leakage continues to cause further damage to the roof 
structure, other building components, paint, and plaster. Paint is peeling at 
an increasing rate, which in turn increases the risk of staff and visitor 



268 



exposure to lead. The persistent roof leaks and falling debris fronn the metal 
ceiling panels prompted the Smithsonian to commission an extensive 
independent survey and analysis of the condition of the AIB roof in 1 998. 
Corrosion of the cast-iron trusses at that time had not progressed to the 
point that failure under heavy snow loads was likely to occur, but 
replacement of the roofing panels and covering was recommended "within 
two or three years" to lessen the risk of significant further corrosion. 
Following the snowfall over the Presidents' Day weekend in February 2003, 
a significant new leak appeared in the building, causing plaster to fall to the 
floor of the gallery in the North Hall. The roofs of two buildings in the 
metropolitan area. The B&O Railroad Museum in Baltimore and the Street 
Market in Washington, collapsed under the weight of the heavy snowfall. 
Both these buildings were built within five years of the construction of the 
AIB and employed very similar construction technologies. An emergency 
inspection of the AIB roof was performed by a structural engineer, temporary 
protection was erected, and a further evaluation of the roof was 
commissioned. The results of that study confirmed the need for action. The 
corrosion of the trusses is progressing, although slowly, but has not yet 
progressed to the point that the trusses are likely to fail. The condition of the 
metal ceiling panels and plywood structural panels, however, has 
deteriorated to the point that portions "are in danger of falling to the floor 
below" in public and staff spaces. Although it is impossible to predict when, 
a partial failure of the roofing may occur at any time, with consequences 
including serious injuries to occupants and visitors and catastrophic damage 
to sensitive information infrastructure or archival records. The 2003 
structural survey report recommended that "... a permanent roof 
repair/replacement program be implemented within two years in order to 
ensure the safety of the museum patrons." The Smithsonian has concluded 
that the building must be vacated by mid-2005 to ensure the health, safety 
and welfare of staff, visitors, and collections. This will require the relocation 
of all staff, collections, and other activities now housed in the building. 

The last major renovation of the building systems took place in the 
1970s. The HVAC, electrical and plumbing systems and equipment are now 
nearly 30 years old and break down with increasing frequency. Plans to 
connect the Arts and Industries Building and the Castle to GSA chilled water 
will be implemented once the building is vacated. Temporary repairs to 
building systems are increasingly ineffective, expensive, and hazardous, due 
to the presence of lead-based paint and asbestos throughout the building. 

Ultimately, the total move and relocation costs vary depending on the 
final scenario approved for rehabilitation of existing Smithsonian space, 
leased space, and/or otherwise acquired space. Design and construction 
costs for "mothballing" the historic structure are currently being developed. 



269 



The Institution plans to seek funding in the future for the revitalization 
project. 

PROJECT DESCRIPTION : 

Relocation plans for AIB occupants have been developed under various 
scenarios including existing Smithsonian space and leased space, balancing 
programnnatic efficiency and cost. In addition to offices, several specialized 
spaces must be relocated, including collections (archives, requiring heavy 
floor-loading), public programs (the AIB exhibition program and Discovery 
Theater), the infant/toddler day care center, and the Institution's entire 
central computer center and support spaces. The FY 2005 budget request 
includes $26.4 million to relocate AIB occupants to both permanent and 
temporary (should the renovation project go forward) owned and leased 
space. An additional cost ("above-the-line") of $7.4 million is included in 
FY 2005 to consolidate the Smithsonian Institution Archives (SIA) and the 
Office of the Chief Information Officer (OCIO) from various remote and local 
locations into the new, permanent location(s). This consolidation will take 
advantage of this unique opportunity to eliminate a number of operating 
inefficiencies for both units. Currently, OCIO staff and equipment are located 
in several different buildings, requiring daily travel time between sites even 
for routine tasks. SIA collections are located in a number of geographical 
locations, from Virginia to Pennsylvania, which hampers comprehensive 
treatment and use of the materials by staff and scholars. 

PROGRESS TO DATE : 

Planning has already begun for the relocation of collections, programs, 
and occupants. Design will begin once final locations are determined, 
preferably no later than October 2003. The FY 2005 request is needed to 
implement the construction, space fit-out, and move of collections and 
occupants by July 2005. Although members of the House and Senate 
introduced legislation to authorize use of the Arts and Industries Building to 
establish a National Museum of African American History and Culture in 
2001, other sites are also now under consideration, and a final decision on 
the location of the Museum will not be made for some time. 

The Smithsonian has completed the design of the AIB restoration 
project to approximately the 50% stage, and $5 million is included in the 
FY 2005 request for Facilities Planning and Design in order to complete 
design. The estimated cost of the total renovation of the Arts and Industries 
Building is estimated preliminarily to be about $182 million, and is currently 
programmed as a new start in FY 2007. 



270 



IMPACT OF DELAY : 

The Arts and Industries Building must be closed for compelling safety 
reasons. If funding is not approved, cuts to other critical programs across the 
Institution would be required to obtain necessary resources to close the 
building and relocate its occupants and contents, with significant adverse 
impact to programs and facilities. Failure to take advantage of the move to 
consolidate OCIO and SIA functions will perpetuate operating inefficiencies 
for both units. 



271 



PROJECT TITLE: Construct/Install Anti-terrorism Protection 
INSTALLATION: Mall and off-Mall Facilities 
LOCATION: Washington DC and New York City 

FY 2005 COST ESTIMATE (Thousands of Dollars): 
Construction of pernnanent barriers, 
pop-up barriers and guard booths at 
NMNH and NASM 4,600 

Chemical, biological and radiological 

mitigation at multiple facilities 300 

4,900 4,900 

PRIOR YEAR FUNDING (S&E and Supplemental funding) : 
Design 2,100 

Construction of permanent physical 

security barriers at Mall facilities 9,425 
Anti-shatter film (window hardening) 1,400 

12,925 12,925 

FUTURE YEAR FUNDING 
(FY 2006-FY 2011) 

Design 1 ,000 

Construction of permanent physical 
security barriers at Mall and 

off-Mall facilities 1 6,500 

Anti-shatter film (window hardening) 13,300 
Chemical, biological and radiological 

mitigation at multiple facilities 1 ,500 

Perimeter CCTV at off-Mall facilities 600 

Electronic access control 700 

33,600 33,600 

Total 51,425 

PROJECT BACKGROUND: 

The Institution is responsible for the security and safety of an 
extensive and complex physical plant that includes 1 6 buildings that house 
museums and galleries in Washington DC and New York City; a National 
Zoological Park in Washington and animal conservation center in Front Royal, 
Virginia; and restoration and storage buildings and centers for research and 
education in a number of locations throughout the country and in the 
Republic of Panama. Smithsonian facilities receive 25-30 million visits per 
year, support important research activities, and provide space for the care 
and long-term preservation of living collections and artifacts representing our 



272 



national historical and cultural heritage and the record of the natural world 
around us. Since the terrorist attacks on New York and Washington on 
September 1 1, 2001, the Institution has developed a comprehensive plan for 
reducing the risk of a terrorist attack occurring at a Smithsonian museum, 
and minimizing the damage to people, collections, and buildings should such 
an event take place. With the help of outside experts, staff performed risk 
assessments, reviewed security and disaster preparedness plans, and 
commissioned blast assessments for Smithsonian public buildings. This 
resulted in the following recommendations to mitigate against vulnerabilities: 
installation of physical barriers separating the buildings from the street; 
installation of anti-shatter window film (or interior retro-fits) to mitigate the 
effects of glass window walls and doors shattering during a blast event; 
increased building perimeter camera surveillance; improved building 
emergency voice systems; secured non-public building areas with electronic 
access control; electronic screening of mail and visitors for the most heavily 
visited museums; protection against chemical, biological, and radiological 
attack; and mitigation against the effects of blast and progressive collapse. 

The Institution installed temporary physical barriers around most major 
museum buildings with funding received in the FY 2002 Anti-Terrorism 
Supplemental, and increased security officer presence outside its buildings. 
Funding received in the FY 2003 Salaries and Expenses account provided 
Phase I funding for permanent capital improvements that involve more 
complex design, construction, and installation issues and require appropriate 
approvals from the Commission of Fine Arts and the National Capital 
Planning Commission. 

PROJECT JUSTIFICATION : 

Risk assessments conducted at the Smithsonian since September 1 1 , 
2001, have recommended new security measures for all Smithsonian 
museums and facilities. The popular recognition of the Smithsonian name, 
the American icons contained in its facilities, and the high level of public 
access and visitation distinguish the Smithsonian facilities from other 
government office buildings. 

PROJECT DESCRIPTION : 

The anti-terrorism program consists of multiple projects to reduce the 
Institution's vulnerability, including Mall-wide site adaptations, modifications 
to building perimeters, and additions and modifications to building systems. 
The program will be implemented over multiple fiscal years with emphasis on 
the highest-priority projects to reduce Smithsonian vulnerability to attack. 
The full program includes the following elements: 

• Construct Permanent Physical Security Barriers: Install hardened perimeter 
barriers, pop-up barriers, and guard booths to provide a reasonable 



273 



standoff distance from Smithsonian facilities, thus ensuring that vehicles 
carrying explosives cannot drive immediately adjacent to building 
exteriors. 

• Mitigate Window Glass Hazards: Modify windows, including film 
application with frame restraints or interior retro-fits to prevent glass from 
shattering into deadly shards. 

• Install Perimeter Camera Systems: Provide exterior surveillance camera 
and monitoring in the security control rooms. Full-time recording by these 
cameras will provide invaluable investigative information in the event of a 
potential security or terrorist related event. 

• Provide Electronic Access Control: Install electronic access control (card 
readers) at all public/staff separation points throughout Smithsonian 
facilities to restrict the public's ability to gain access to sensitive and 
critical areas. 

• Modify Air Intakes for Chemical, Biological, and Radiological Mitigation: 
Modify and protect facility air intakes and HVAC systems at ail 
Smithsonian facilities to prevent or reduce the impact of a potential 
chemical/biological/radiological attack against major metropolitan areas or 
the Smithsonian. 

• Provide Permanent Public Visitor Screening at NMNH and NMAH: Install 
adequate numbers of magnetometers and x-ray equipment at each 
entrance of these two museums. This will improve security and speed 
visitors' entry process into these popular museums. Funding for NMNH is 
planned with FY 2006 NMNH major renewal and for NMAH as part of the 
NMAH public space renewal in FY 2005. 

The $4.9 million requested for FY 2005 includes Phase II of 
construction of permanent physical barriers around Smithsonian facilities on 
the National Mall ($4.6 million) and Phase I of necessary modifications to 
mitigate the effects of potential chemical, biological, and radiological attacks 
at the Institution's most vulnerable locations ($0.3 million). The Institution 
plans to seek incremental funding to complete the program over the next five 
years. 

PROGRESS TO DATE : 

The Institution has completed risk assessments of all major 
Smithsonian facilities; completed blast assessments of NMNH, NMAH, 
NASM, AIB, POB, and HMSG; installed temporary barriers around NASM, 
NMNH, and NMAH and partial barriers at HMSG; implemented full electronic 
screening of all visitors at NASM and temporary screening at NMNH and 
NMAH; awarded installation of select CCTV, emergency voice (or PA) 
systems and glass mitigation projects; and initiated design of Mall-wide 
permanent perimeter barriers. Additionally, other perimeter CCTV and 
emergency voice systems are in design. 



274 



Preliminary design of tlie permanent barriers is underway and will 
adhere to the National Capital Planning Commission's guidelines and be 
consistent with those planned for the Capitol, National Archives, and other 
monuments or iconic buildings. 

IMPACT OF DELAY : 

If the requested funding is not provided for the outlined initiatives, 
there is an increased likelihood of damage to people, collections, and 
buildings in the event of a terrorist attack. The Smithsonian name, symbols 
of American culture and achievements, and the large numbers of public 
visitors make it an attractive target to terrorists. The lack of necessary anti- 
terrorism protection increases the Institution's vulnerability. 



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PROJECT TITLE: Asia Trail II: Elephants (formerly Phases II & III) 
INSTALLATION: National Zoological Park 
LOCATION: Washington DC 

FY 2005 COST ESTIMATE (Thousands of Dollars): 

Initiate construction 34,000 * 

* These funds are requested as an extraordinary one-time increase over normal funding levels in the capital program 

PRIOR YEAR FUNDING : 

Facility Planning and Design 4,000 

FUTURE YEAR FUNDING (FY 2006): 

Complete construction 29,000 

Total 67,000 

BUILDING/SITE BACKGROUND: 

The National Zoological Park in Washington DC, a National Historic 
District, was designed in the 1 890s by the firm of renowned landscape 
architect Frederick Law Olmsted and architect Williams Ralph Emerson. The 
Byzantine-style Reptile House and Renaissance-style Elephant House 
exemplify the tradition of architect-designed buildings at the Zoo. The Zoo's 
elephants are a very popular attraction, especially since the birth of the male 
Asian elephant Kandula in November 2001 . The Elephant House is a stone 
structure in the heart of the Zoo's 1 67-acre site, and was designed to house 
and exhibit African mammals. As part of the Asia Trail, the Zoo plans to 
construct new elephant yards and interior holding space adjacent to the 
existing Elephant House building, then renovate the Elephant House into a 
modern exhibition space for the visitor to experience these endangered 
animals. 

PROJECT JUSTIFICATION : 

The National Zoological Park is more than 1 1 years old and its age 
and popularity have taken a visible toll. The Zoo's physical environment is 
deteriorating. Many of the largest creatures — lions, tigers, bears, elephants, 
giraffes, hippopotamus, and rhinoceros— are housed in the oldest areas. Yet 
families come to the Zoo primarily to see these species, sometimes called 
"charismatic mega-vertebrates." The sloth bear exhibit was built in the late 
1890s, for example, and the Elephant House in the 1930s. 

With the birth of the male elephant in November 2001 , NZP is moving 
towards its goal of housing and exhibiting elephants as recommended by 
current zoological standards. With the introduction of a male elephant Into 
the collection, housing requirements have changed dramatically. More space, 
stronger housing, and the ability to separate the keeper and the elephant at 



276 



all times are now required. The current building and yards do not meet any of 
these requirements. Additionally, the building's mechanical and electrical 
systems are more than 50 years old and break down frequently. It is not 
possible to maintain acceptable water quality due the limitations of the pools 
and plumbing systems. The roof and skylights leak; this causes deterioration 
of internal surfaces and fixtures and unsafe conditions for the public, staff, 
and the animals. 

The National Zoo has an opportunity to become a leader in elephant 
management and reproductive studies, both in situ and ex situ, but such 
studies require a large space to have the animal numbers needed to create a 
multi-generational herd. Space is a major health and welfare issue for 
elephants. As ethical concerns are raised about how elephants are 
maintained in captivity, NZP must lead by example, providing a top-notch 
facility that shows how much it cares about elephants— enough to build a 
facility to ensure their well being. Lack of exercise is believed to be a health 
issue and a cause for the high stillbirth and dystocia (difficult birthing) rates 
seen in ex situ elephant populations worldwide. Elephants in zoos also are 
prone to developing arthritis and have foot problems that are due, in large 
part, to a lack of space for proper exercise. The planned new elephant 
facility will provide space to ensure that the elephants get adequate exercise. 

PROJECT DESCRIPTION : 

The National Zoo's renewal plan reorganizes and rebuilds the Zoo, 
grouping animals by their natural geographic locations. As its first major 
component, the mission of Asia Trail is to create a compelling, Asian-themed 
path from the new Sloth Bear exhibit at the main entrance, to the renovated 
and expanded Panda House, and to a new world-class Elephant House 
housing a series of Asian animals by the end of 2007. In FY 2004, the Zoo 
will begin a comprehensive update of the Rock Creek Master Plan as part of 
its overall strategic planning for integrated exhibitions, collections, and 
facilities. The Master Plan will guide implementation of future components of 
the renewal plan. 

In accomplishing this mission, the Asia Trail II project will provide a 
new facility for the long-range commitment to house, breed, and continue 
important research on a multi-generational herd of up to eight adult Asian 
elephants. The proposed new facilities will provide adequate year round 
housing, new exhibit yards, safe primary containment, and heavily 
landscaped perimeters. An innovative elephant trek feature is designed to 
exercise the animals as well as offer sensory stimulus outside their daily 
routine. Large pools and multiple enrichment devices in the animals' 
enclosures will allow the elephants to exhibit behavior traits currently 
restricted by space limitations. For example, an adult elephant will be able to 



277 



completely submerge in the largest pool. Accessible areas surrounding the 
elephant enclosures will let the public observe the elephants and keeper 
demonstrations with new and exciting interpretive programs. 

The Zoo's goal is to create a multi-generational herd that will allow 
studying a population closer in structure to what is found in nature. The Zoo 
predicts that this will produce more accurate data while promoting the health 
and welfare of individuals held in captivity. The National Zoo will be one of 
only a few institutions committed to (or capable of) achieving this goal 
within the next 20 years. A multi-generational herd will encourage more 
normal behaviors and interactions among the elephants, and this will be 
documented with careful scientifically based research on behavior and 
hormonal analyses. 

Funds for this project will provide two new exhibit yards for elephants 
and renovate the existing Elephant House with increased interior holding 
space for cows, calves, and bulls. The project will be constructed in phases 
to accommodate the existing elephant herd at the National Zoological Park. 

The total estimated cost for Asia Trail II is $69.5 million, of which 
$4.0 million has been funded to date to begin design, and $2.5 million will 
be provided by the Friends of the National Zoo (FONZ) to complete design. 
The Institution is requesting special consideration of the $34 million needed 
for FY 2005 to initiate construction. Although this amount Is well above 
normal funding levels In this account, the resources are urgently needed in 
order to complete the facilities required to handle the male elephant before 
his sixth birthday in 2007. 

PROGRESS TO DATE : 

Program requirements have been developed In house, and conceptual 
design is approximately 10% complete. The Institution is currently 
negotiating with an architectural and engineering firm to complete design of 
Asia Trail II. A separate Environmental Assessment will be conducted 
concurrently with design. 

IMPACT OF DELAY : 

A delay would undermine the Zoo's ability to improve the quality of 
life for the Asian elephants, and place the elephant program at risk. The new 
elephant spaces must be available by FY 2007, when the male elephant 
reaches age 6 and becomes dangerous to care for in the current facilities. 
Building system failures will accelerate, causing Increased rates of failure in 
the mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems at the existing Elephant 
House, which is a historically significant structure. Additionally, some of the 
most difficult and long overdue accessibility issues at the National Zoo will 



278 



be further delayed until this project is completed. Deferral of this project will 
require the Zoo to begin a search for a new honne for the male elephant and 
will ultimately ripple into delays in subsequent projects intended to bring the 
housing of other Zoo animals into compliance with U.S. Department of 
Agriculture and American Zoo and Aquarium Association standards, and to 
correct extensive infrastructure deficiencies throughout the National 
Zoological Park. 



279 



Other Revitalization Projects 

Projects in this category correct extensive and serious facilities 
deficiencies to materially extend the service life of systems costing between 
$500,000 and $5 million. Unlike the major revitalization projects, however, 
these projects are smaller in scale, and usually involve capital repair or 
replacement of individual systems or components. The capital repair projects 
formerly included in Code Compliance and Security and Infrastructure Repair 
are now included here. Descriptions of each project follow the summary 
below. 



Facility Project $(000) 

National Zoological Park Replace Roof and Skylights at Elephant, 4,000 

Reptile, Small Mammal and Ape Houses 

National Zoological Park Improve/Upgrade Site Utilities 1 ,000 

National Zoological Park Improve Fire Protection Systems 600 

Environmental Research Ctr. Consolidate and Improve Alcohol 600 

Storage 

Hirshhorn Museum Replace Loading Dock Retaining Walls 500 

National Zoological Park Renovate/Improve Restrooms and 500 

Amenities 

Quadrangle Repair Roof Leaks 500 

Multiple Locations Personnel 3,000 

Multiple Locations Miscellaneous projects under $500,000 5,450 

TOTAL _ 16,150 



280 



PROJECT TITLE: Replace Roof and Skylights at Elephant, Reptile, Small 

Mamnnal, and Ape Houses 
INSTALLATION: National Zoological Park 
LOCATION: Rock Creek Park, Washington, DC 

FY 2005 COST ESTIMATE (Thousands of Dollars): 4,000 

PRIOR YEAR FUNDING : 1,397 

FUTURE YEAR FUNDING (FY 2006-FY 2009): 6,000 

PROJECT DESCRIPTION: 



Among the most significant facilities problems at the National 
Zoological Park are the leaking roofs, skylights, and facades of several major 
buildings: Elephant House, Small Mammal House, Reptile House, and Ape 
House. Although the Zoo's long-term revitalization program will totally 
modernize these buildings in future years, current leaks continue to worsen 
and emergency repairs are no longer adequate to ensure the safety of 
animals and visitors. Funds provided in FY 2003, including a Congressional 
add-on of $497,000, will allow the Institution to design the roof 
replacements for these four buildings. The Zoo has identified a roofing 
system that will enable replacement of the roofs now but can still be utilized 
when the buildings are fully restored later. The Institution requests $4 million 
in FY 2005 to replace the roofs of two of the four buildings. Funding 
projected for future years will replace the other roofs in order of most urgent 
need. 



PROJECT TITLE: Improve/Upgrade Site Utilities 
INSTALLATION: National Zoological Park 
LOCATION: Rock Creek Park, Washington, DC 

FY 2005 COST ESTIMATE (Thousands of Dollars): 1 ,000 

PRIOR YEAR FUNDING : 993 

FUTURE YEAR FUNDING (FY 2006-FY 2009): 3,500 

PROJECT DESCRIPTION: 

A 2001 site utility study identified $7 million of water supply, storm- 
water management and drainage, sewer, contaminated water, electric, and 
other utility and landscaping work needed at the National Zoological Park in 



281 



Rock Creek. The current utility infrastructure is totally inadequate to meet 
the needs of the Zoo and to support its live animal collections. Funds 
provided in FY 2003 of $993,000 will be used to upgrade the Zoo's 
electrical service, by adding a new feeder and increasing capacity of the 
existing two feeders. The Institution requests $1 million in FY 2005 to 
complete additional utility work needed in conjunction with the Asia Trail 
projects discussed previously. 



PROJECT TITLE: Improve Fire Protection Systems 
INSTALLATION: National Zoological Park 
LOCATION: Rock Creek Park, Washington, DC 

FY 2005 COST ESTIMATE (Thousands of Dollars): 600 

PRIOR YEAR FUNDING : 

FUTURE YEAR FUNDING (FY 2006-FY 2009): 1,500 



PROJECT DESCRIPTION: 



Fire-alarm, smoke detection, and fire-suppression systems at the 
National Zoological Park are significantly deficient and have limited coverage. 
The Smithsonian requests $600,000 in FY 2005 to begin a systematic 
upgrade of the systems throughout the Zoo in order to protect the visitors, 
staff, and animals and meet current life-safety codes. 



PROJECT TITLE: Consolidate and Improve Alcohol Storage 
INSTALLATION: Smithsonian Environmental Research Center 
LOCATION: Edgewater, MD 

FY 2005 COST ESTIMATE (Thousands of Dollars): 600 

PRIOR YEAR FUNDING : 

FUTURE YEAR FUNDING (FY 2006-FY 2009): 

PROJECT DESCRIPTION: 



As an integral and necessary component of the research at the 
Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC), biological specimens are 
preserved in alcohol for later study. SERC currently stores these specimens 
in various locations, mostly in individual laboratories, under conditions that 



282 



do not meet the National Fire Protection Association Fire Prevention (NFPA) 
Code for storage of flammable and combustible materials. There is a 
significant but limited safety risk associated with very small quantities of 
specimens stored in alcohol. In FY 2005, the Institution plans to construct a 
small building to consolidate all alcohol storage in a single code-compliant 
location in order to comply with the NFPA code to eliminate the flammable 
and combustible hazard currently existing at numerous laboratory and 
storage locations at SERC. When complete, all specimens stored in alcohol 
will be housed in one building, designed and constructed to comply with the 
national fire and life-safety codes. 



PROJECT TITLE: Replace Loading Dock Retaining Walls 
INSTALLATION: Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden 
LOCATION: Washington, DC 

FY 2005 COST ESTIMATE (Thousands of Dollars): 500 

PRIOR YEAR FUNDING: 



FUTURE YEAR FUNDING (FY 2006-FY 2009): 



PROJECT DESCRIPTION: 



The Institution requests $500,000 to replace the damaged loading 
dock retaining walls at the Hirshhorn Museum. The work is urgently needed 
in order to maintain the structural integrity of the retaining wall. A delay 
would allow further deterioration that could impact the safety of staff using 
the loading dock. 



PROJECT TITLE: Renovate/Improve Restrooms and Amenities 
INSTALLATION: National Zoological Park 
LOCATION: Rock Creek Park, Washington, DC 

FY 2005 COST ESTIMATE (Thousands of Dollars): 500 

PRIOR YEAR FUNDING : 

FUTURE YEAR FUNDING (FY 2006-FY 2009): 2,300 



283 



PROJECT DESCRIPTION: 

With 2 to 3 million visitors frequenting the Zoo each year, the limited 
restroom facilities have been hard-pressed to serve far beyond their useful 
design life. The result is shabby conditions in the restrooms, frequent 
outages for repairs, and long lines of visitors waiting for the available 
functioning devices. In addition to the physical condition of the spaces, 
virtually all restrooms at the National Zoo fail to fully comply with 
accessibility guidelines. Because not all facilities can be taken out of service 
at one time, the Zoo is planning to renew the restrooms on a four-year 
phased program beginning in FY 2005. The first increment of funding will be 
for design and implementation of the most urgent improvements in failed 
public areas of the Zoo. Subsequent phases will continue the renovations 
until all facilities are renewed and comply with current building, health, 
safety, and accessibility code requirements. The Smithsonian requests 
$500,000 in FY 2005 to begin this work. 



PROJECT TITLE: Repair Roof Leaks 
INSTALLATION: Quadrangle Building 
LOCATION: Washington, DC 

FY 2005 COST ESTIMATE (Thousands of Dollars): 500 

PRIOR YEAR FUNDING : 

FUTURE YEAR FUNDING (FY 2006-FY 2009): 

PROJECT DESCRIPTION: 



The Quadrangle building is experiencing a number of roof leaks above 
the loading dock that have been worsening in the last several years. The 
Institution plans to use $500,000 in FY 2005 to repair the roof to extend its 
life until the whole roofing system can be replaced. The work will involve 
moving the garden materials above the loading dock and adjacent spaces in 
order to repair that portion of the roof, and replacing the soil and plants. 



PROJECT TITLE: Personnel 
INSTALLATION: Multiple Locations 
LOCATION: Smithsonian-wide 

FY 2005 COST ESTIMATE (Thousands of Dollars): 3,000 

PRIOR YEAR FUNDING (FY 2004): 3,000 



284 



FUTURE YEAR FUNDING (FY 2006): 3,000 

Total, 9,000 

PROJECT DESCRIPTION: 

This request includes staff costs for permanent construction 
management staff required to supervise and administer construction 
contracts as well as term and temporary staff required to perform specialized 
work associated with revitaiization projects. A total of 27 FTEs will be 
funded from this request. The permanent staff of 22 construction 
management engineers will cost approximately $2.5 million in FY 2005. 
Additional construction management staff is budgeted for the Patent Office 
Building renovation project, the National Museum of American Indian Mall 
Museum project, and the Pod 5 project, and are included in the descriptions 
of those projects. The engineers directly supervise construction contractors 
on site performing revitaiization work, exhibits construction, and other 
modifications in Smithsonian buildings to be sure that quality work is 
performed safely. In addition, they resolve issues that arise during 
construction, negotiate change orders, approve payments, and perform other 
administrative functions as Contracting Officer's Technical Representatives. 
The total cost of this permanent corps of construction managers amounts to 
approximately 3-4 percent of the revitaiization work expected to be in 
progress each year, and this arrangement will allow the Institution to charge 
these costs directly to the project/program in a way comparable to the 
practices of other agencies such as NASA and the Army Corps of Engineers. 

This request also funds five contract specialists providing support to 
all aspects of the procurement process for acquiring the necessary contract 
services to execute the capital program. These five positions will cost 
approximately $500,000 in FY 2005. 

The Institution must have an appropriate level of construction 
management staff to perform essential owner functions to supervise 
construction activities in order to ensure that quality work is completed 
safely, on time, and within budget. A professional trained staff will diminish 
the risk of owner-caused delays and related costs increases, and ensure that 
the work is appropriately coordinated with building occupants. Contracting 
support is essential to ensure the timely award of planning, design, and 
construction contracts to execute the capital program. 



285 



CONSTRUCTION 

Projects in this category represent an investment in the continuing 
vitality of all Smithsonian programs. The creation of the Air and Space 
Museum's new Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center at Dulles Airport and the 
National Museum of the American Indian on the Mall testify to the vigorous 
spirit of public outreach that will bring more visitors in touch with their 
national collections. Furthermore, advances in science demand new locations 
for research and plant expansion to sustain increasingly complex research 
requirements. The Institution is also committed to providing appropriate, 
safe, and secure storage and care facilities for its extensive and valuable 
collections. 

Location 

Museum Support Center 

Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory 

TOTAL 18,990 



Project 


$(000) 


Construct Pod 5 


18,000 


VERITAS Construction 


990 



286 



PROJECT TITLE: Construct Pod 5 
INSTALLATION: Museum Support Center 
LOCATION: Suitland, MD 

FY 2005 COST ESTIMATE (Thousands of Dollars): 

Site work and construction 18,000 

PRIOR YEAR FUNDING : 

Facility Planning and Design 2,400 

Initiate construction 10,000 12,400 

FUTURE YEAR FUNDING (FY 2006): 

Total 30,400 

BUILDING BACKGROUND: 

Built in 1 983 as designed by architectural firms Keyes, Condon, 
Florance and Metcalf and Toby, the modern, precast concrete center is a 
research, conservation, and collection storage facility providing optimum 
environments for the storage, preservation, and study of Smithsonian 
collections. The 524,000-square-foot facility houses no public exhibits. 
Rather, it has four large collections storage bays, referred to as pods, and an 
office-laboratory complex. The building is not open to the public, except for 
scholars and researchers. 

The bays were initially designed and constructed as open, 
undesignated-use space, to be later fit out to meet the needs of the 
collections to be stored in them. In the mid-1 990's, Pod 3 was considered 
for the storage of natural history specimens preserved in alcohol. The Natural 
History Museum engaged in a lengthy design process to complete the 
installation of a steel collections storage structure in Pod 3; this was 
necessary as the pods were not constructed with intermediate floors, in 
order to permit maximum flexibility. In the face of prudent fire-safety 
practices and the needs of the collections, it became impractical to upgrade 
Pod 3 to meet the standards required for alcohol storage. The design 
estimated that it would cost over $13 million to upgrade Pod 3, and it still 
would not fully meet building codes. The need remains for a code-compliant 
alcohol collections storage facility off the National Mall that will permanently 
house the Museum's alcohol collections, including those still in the NMNH 
building on the Mall. The proposed Pod 5 will provide a safe code-compliant 
environment for these collections, while freeing up valuable space at the 
NMNH Mall building and making Pod 3 available for other Institutional uses. 



287 



PROJECT JUSTIFICATION: 

The design and construction of Pod 5 is the Smithsonian's highest- 
priority safety and security project. The Smithsonian has the world's largest 
collection of animal and botanical specimens preserved in alcohol, including a 
unique "type" collection of fishes that is the world-wide standard against 
which all fish species are compared. The Museum's irreplaceable collection is 
at risk of total loss because the containers of highly flammable alcohol (flash 
point of approximately 70° F) are stored in spaces at the NMNH building on 
the Mall that do not meet fire-code standards. In addition, the events of 
September 1 1 , 2001 , have put a higher level of emphasis and increased 
necessity on proceeding with this project. 

Currently, approximately 365,000 gallons of alcohol preserves these 
collections in six locations of the building's space. This includes 3,000 
gallons of alcohol and other flammable liquids that are stored in rooms 
beneath the Museum's entrance and steps leading from the National Mall. 
These collections fill three entire levels of the West Wing, as well as portions 
of two others. The spaces that house these alcohol-stored collections do not 
comply with National Fire Codes. All the storage areas are interior rooms 
with no means to naturally ventilate them in the event of a fire, increasing 
the risk of explosion and making it dangerous for fire fighters. The fire codes 
limit the size of such rooms to 500 square feet. All of the Museum's 
collection storage rooms far exceed this size, with several exceeding 15,000 
square feet. The codes require flammable liquid storage rooms to have liquid- 
tight floors and spill-proof containment or drainage, but the Museum's rooms 
do not. A major spill, or a fire involving the application of lots of water, will 
spread liquids to adjacent areas and lower floors. The codes require such 
rooms to be separated from adjacent spaces by fire-rated construction, and 
to be provided with adequately designed ventilation and fire suppression 
systems. The walls, floors, and ceilings throughout this building are riddled 
with holes that would allow a fire to spread, the ventilation systems are 
inadequate, and the fire systems could easily be overtaxed. The current 
alcohol storage within the building puts the entire landmark structure, the 
collections, Smithsonian staff, and the visiting public at risk. Approximately 
275,000 gallons of alcohol in hundreds of thousands of glass and metal 
storage containers will be moved to Pod 5. Ninety thousand gallons will 
remain at the NHB in new collection rooms that will be constructed in 
compliance with National Fire Codes. 

Renovating all of the existing space in the Mall Museum to become 
code-compliant can only be achieved through extraordinarily disruptive and 
costly means. The resultant space would only house a fraction of the 
collections now located on the Mall due to the 500-square-foot maximum for 
each storage room. The safest solution is the construction of a fifth pod at 



288 



the Museum Support Center in Suitland, where security inside the perimeter 
fencing provides the lowest risk. The fifth pod would effectively isolate the 
alcohol collections stored at MSC from vulnerable, less volatile collections in 
nearby existing pods. 

PROJECT DESCRIPTION: 



The preliminary scope of the project is to construct a 1 20,000-gross- 
square-foot addition to the Museum Support Center to house 250,000 
gallons of alcohol collections in jars and tanks now in Pod 3 and 275,000 
gallons of alcohol collections from the Natural History Museum on the Mall. 
The new pod will contain three levels of storage. The height of the pod will 
be determined based upon the requirement to provide appropriate space 
above and around the containers to provide adequate ventilation. The design 
of Pod 5 will accommodate existing shelving systems utilized by the 
Museum, as well as new shelving and compactor systems that are suitable 
for use with this kind of collection. Purchasing new equipment and relocating 
existing shelving are included in the project. A utility and access "street" will 
connect the pod to the rest of the existing building. Laboratory/research 
space of approximately 42,000 gross square feet and a new loading dock 
will provide support to activities related to the alcohol collections. The new 
pod is in accordance with the approved master plan for the Suitland campus. 
The estimated cost of $28 million to construct and equip the building will be 
further refined and a baseline (scope, schedule, and budget) established once 
the building has been designed to the 35% stage. 

The Institution received approval to reprogram $2.4 million from 
Repair, Restoration and Alteration of Facilities in FY 2003 in order to design 
Pod 5, and has requested $10 million in FY 2004 to begin construction using 
a multi-year contracting mechanism. The $18 million requested for FY 2005 
will allow the Smithsonian to complete construction and equipping of the 
new facility. These resources include 5 FTEs beginning in FY 2004 for 
construction management staff to supervise the construction contract. 

PROGRESS TO DATE: 



The Institution has awarded a design contract, and design has been 
initiated. The contract calls for delivery of final design documents in nine 
months. The preliminary milestone schedule is to complete the design in late 
spring 2004, award the construction contract in late summer 2004, and 
complete construction by spring 2006. 

IMPACT OF DELAY: 



In order to improve safety for staff, visitors, and the collections 
themselves, it is essential to provide code-compliant, secure storage for the 
collections preserved in alcohol as soon as possible. The National Museum of 



289 



Natural History and its staff, visiting public, and collections remain at risk 
with the alcohol collections inadequately protected within the building on the 
Mall. 



290 



PROJECT TITLE: VERITAS Construction 

INSTALLATION: Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) 

LOCATION: Kitt Peak National Observatory, Arizona 

FY 2005 COST ESTIMATE (Thousands of Dollars): 

Construction 990 

PRIOR YEAR FUNDING : 

FUTURE YEAR FUNDING (FY 2006): 

Total 990 

BUILDING BACKGROUND: 

The Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System 
(VERITAS) observatory represents a dramatic step forward in the study of 
extreme astrophysical processes in the universe. The field of ground-based 
gamma-ray astronomy has been revolutionized by the power of the 
atmospheric Cherenkov imaging technique. This technique was developed by 
the Smithsonian Whipple Observatory Gamma-Ray Collaboration. The 
VERITAS observatory will advance our understanding of the origin of cosmic 
rays, the nature of galactic jets, the density of the background infrared 
radiation, and the magnetic fields within supernova remnants. External 
reviews of VERITAS have been uniformly glowing. The latest, carried out for 
the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy in December 
2002, concluded that VERITAS has high intellectual merit and should have a 
broad impact on the scientific community and society in general, that 
VERITAS will address a rich and compelling list of science goals, and that it 
will occupy a central place in the high energy astrophysics of the next 
decade, leveraging the results expected from NASA's Gamma-Ray Large 
Area Space Telescope (GLAST) and other high energy missions, and forging 
strong connections with the wider astrophysics community. 

The VERITAS site is expected to be in Horseshoe Canyon, Arizona, at 
the Kitt Peak National Observatory. Prior to the Kitt Peak selection, Montosa 
Canyon was the candidate site, but it was changed because of funding 
availability from the supporting agencies and the time requirement with 
regard to VERITAS being operational prior to the launch of the GLAST 
spacecraft. There remains one step left in the process to ensure use of Kitt 
Peak as the site. The project cost will be approximately $20 million. This 
cost is being shared with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National 
Science Foundation (NSF), and ten United States and international research 
and academic institutions. 



291 



PROJECT JUSTIFICATION: 

SAO astronomers have been pioneers in ground-based gamma-ray 
observation technology. Discoveries made at the SAO F. L. Whipple 
Observatory in Arizona form the basis for the development of VERITAS. It 
was originally planned that the Smithsonian's share of the cost of the 
facilities necessary to support and operate the telescope array would be used 
for site improvements at Montosa Canyon. However, the need to move the 
project to a different site, and the fact that the site improvements must be 
done before FY 2005, result in this request to use the $990,000 included 
here to construct the control building for the project. Funding for site 
improvements and to construct the base support buildings will be included in 
DOE or NSF budget requests. 

PROJECT DESCRIPTION: 



The completed array will consist of seven, 34-foot-aperture telescopes 
placed at the corners and center of a hexagon with 279-foot long sides. 
Each large reflector will have a sophisticated camera at its focus. The initial 
project will install four telescopes, with the remaining three to be added at a 
later time to complete the array. The project includes construction of site 
infrastructure improvements, foundation piers, support structures and a 
central control building. The cost of the project is being shared by the project 
partners. The Smithsonian's share is to construct a control building for which 
the Institution requests $990,000 in FY 2005. The funds to complete site 
development, construction of telescope foundations, and support structures 
will be requested by the National Science Foundation and the Department of 
Energy. 

PROGRESS TO DATE: 

The design will be completed in FY 2004 and construction will begin 
in FY 2005, with building occupancy anticipated for May 2005. 

IMPACT OF DELAY: 

DOE, NSF, and other partners are making significant contributions in 
support of the project. A delay in funding the construction would cause 
project delays, stalling valuable ground-based gamma-ray research. The 
latest review carried out for the National Science Foundation and the 
Department of Energy in December 2002 concluded that VERITAS has high 
intellectual merit and should have a broad impact on the scientific 
community and society in general, that VERITAS will address a rich and 
compelling list of science goals, and that it will occupy a central place in the 
high energy astrophysics of the next decade, leveraging the results expected 
from GLAST and other high energy missions and forging strong connections 
with the wider astrophysics community. 



292 



FACILITIES PLANNING AND DESIGN 

Feasibility studies, needs assessment, and design for capital projects 
are required before work can take place. Resources in this category include 
all costs for contract facility master planning, preliminary and final design for 
all revitalization and construction projects, special studies, and a small 
amount for facility engineering, capital leveraging and research activities, 
similar to Department of Defense and NASA. The funding will allow 
development of project baselines, including costs, scope, and schedule, prior 
to receiving funding to perform the work. 

In order to plan and design ahead of capital program execution, 
funding of about 10% of the following year's program is required each year. 
The funding requested for FY 2005 will provide necessary planning and 
design to at least the 35% stage for projects included in the planned 
FY 2007 program, and will complete design for projects planned for 
FY 2006. This will allow establishment of firm baselines before funding 
requests and enable timely award of construction contracts upon receipt of 
future-year funding. Funding at this level will allow the Institution to maintain 
momentum in modernizing its facilities over the next decade. 

The specific components of the request for FY 2004 include the 
following: 

Facility Project $(000) 

Arts and Industries Building Complete Design of Restoration 5,000 

Museum Support Center Design Renovation of Pod 3 1 ,000 

National Museum of Natural Continue Design of Revitalization 3,000 

History 

National Zoological Park Design Major Revitalization 6,000 

National Zoological Park Update Rock Creek Master Plan 2,000 

Multiple Locations Miscellaneous Facilities Planning 6,050 

and Design 

TOTAL 23,050 

If resources are not provided, the Institution will be unable to proceed 
with vital planning and design activities to ensure the successful execution 
of the long-range capital program. The result will be a significant delay in 
meeting the Institution's goals to return Smithsonian facilities to full 
functionality over the next decade. 



293 



SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION UBRARIES N 

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